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Collaborating for Innovation Success through Research-as-a-Service

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Keynote presentation given at the Hargraves Conference2014 (http://hargraves.com.au/events/conf2014home/conf2014speakers)

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Collaborating for Innovation Success through Research-as-a-Service

  1. 1. Collaborating for Innovation Success throughSuccess through Research-as-a-ServiceResearch as a Service Professor Dr Jan ReckerProfessor Dr Jan Recker Woolworths Chair of Retail Innovation Information Systems School, Queensland University of Technology
  2. 2. Thi T lkThis Talk • Innovation requires evidence-based decisions – Do you use it?Do you use it? • Research-as-a-Service assists Innovations – Do you have access to it? Fi di th i ht ll b ti tt• Finding the right collaboration matters – Do you have the right model?y g
  3. 3. “If the decision is going to be made by  facts, then everyone’s facts […] are  equalequal. If the decision is going to be made on  the basis of people’s opinions thenthe basis of people’s opinions, then  mine count for a lot more “mine count for a lot more. James Barksdale former CEO Netscape
  4. 4. Evidence means ability to innovateEvidence means ability to innovate “The collected wisdom ofThe collected wisdom of baseball insiders is bj ti d fl d “subjective and flawed. In 2004, two years after adopting the sabermetric model, the Boston Red Sox win their first World Series since 1918.
  5. 5. Evidence means ability to innovateEvidence means ability to innovate “The collected wisdom ofThe collected wisdom of baseball insiders is bj ti d fl d “subjective and flawed. In 2004, two years after adopting the sabermetric model, the Boston Red Sox win their first World Series since 1918.
  6. 6. What percentage of yourp g y innovation decisions are id b d?evidence-based?
  7. 7. How do you make InnovationHow do you make Innovation decisions? Conventional decision-making Evidence-based decision-makingdecision making decision making • Typically relies on status (confidence) • Is based on an understanding of truestatus (confidence) • Often uses observations cases or understanding of true cause-effect relationshipsobservations, cases or anecdotes • Values existing or p • Realizes the availability of potential evidenceValues existing or common practices • Runs the danger of • Opposes or neglects tradition, intuition,Runs the danger of using flawed decision models folklore and rules of thumb
  8. 8. Levels of Evidence Which level is the basis for your decisions?
  9. 9. Examplep The danger of case studies “A M i i iP d th t d ’t k”“A Magazine is an iPad that doesn’t work”
  10. 10. Examplep The danger of case studies “P h t f t ”“Paper has a great future”
  11. 11. Requirements for evidence-basedRequirements for evidence based decisions Data awareness what data is appropriate? What data is available?What data is available? What is the quality of available data? The ability to understand scientific concepts Validity and reliability Statistical significance and sample size Replication and biasReplication and bias The ability to analyze, interpret and evaluate statistical information Determine appropriate analyses Identify appropriate visualizations Consider limitations and assumptions C i t ff ti l d t lCommunicate effectively and accurately
  12. 12. Th R h S iThe Research as a Service  M d lModel Collaborations with Universities andCollaborations with Universities and other Research institutions can i t R h i i tinsert Research-as-a-service into as an organizational innovationg support service.
  13. 13. Th R h S iThe Research as a Service  C tComponents • Novel conceptual perspectivesNovel conceptual perspectives • Rigorous scientific principles • Quality empirical evidence U bi d b ti• Unbiased observation
  14. 14. Example #1 Positive Deviance in BakeriesPositive Deviance in Bakeries
  15. 15. Example #1 Positive Deviance in BakeriesPositive Deviance in Bakeries “Wh i i“Where in our company is innovation and success alreadyy happening?
  16. 16. Novel Perspective: Positive DevianceNovel Perspective: Positive Deviance a practice that stands out from a pool of comparable practices as it shows better performance under the same environmental conditions. A shift in management thinking, from “fixing errors” to “rewarding and learning from the best”
  17. 17. Rigorous scientific principlesRigorous scientific principles Who is truly successful? Positive Deviant Positive Deviant Positive Deviant Positive Deviant Why are they truly successful? mance Positive Deviant Positive Deviant successful? Which true root causes processperfor Average Positive Deviant can we insert elsewhere to improve all Salesp p processes? Number of customers
  18. 18. Unbiased observationUnbiased observation
  19. 19. Quality Empirical EvidenceQ y p “It’s not necessarily the process”It s not necessarily the process everyone follows the same process model “It’s not the competition” process performance independent from local context Individual motivation and the willingness to ‘do something extra’do something extra Clever use of mark-downs, baking scheduling Culture: collaboration and communication between depa tmentsdepartments Exchange of ideas inter-departmental Creativity: finding new solutions for products,Creativity: finding new solutions for products, display and service; willingly deviate from standardized process. Exchange of knowledge between storesExchange of knowledge between stores
  20. 20. The Difference? %] Bottom 10% Top 10% 25% Percentile 50% Percentile 75% Percentile ce[in%rofrmancocessperPro Cumulative number of store processes Improving 10% Improving 90%
  21. 21. KKeyy TakeawaysTakeaways Collaborationfor research as a serviceCollaborationfor research-as-a-service
  22. 22. #01 Research-as-a-Service l d t i t #01 leads to conscious competence. AdoptionAdoption Unconscious Conscious Competence Competence Unconscious Incompetence Conscious Incompetence
  23. 23. #02 Beware of ll b ti t d ff #02 collaboration tradeoffs. Management Long live the difference Management (used to express appreciation of diversity). Woolworths QUTWoolworths QUT Gain Competitive Advantage Create knowledge Internal to Woolworths Tell the world Short, outcome based communication All the exciting details of new information must be shared. Outcome focus communication Capture all knowledge Get to the outcome quickly Explore all possibilities. Time is secondary W ill k ti E id b dWe will make some assumptions Evidence-based Involve people that can implement Involve people with knowledge
  24. 24. #03 Find your Collaboration Model. #03Governance L li thGovernance Long live the difference (used to express appreciation of diversity).
  25. 25. Prof. Jan Recker, PhD Woolworths Chair of Retail InnovationWoolworths Chair of Retail Innovation Information Systems School Science and Engineering Faculty Queensland University of Technology email j.recker@qut.edu.au web www.janrecker.com twitter janreckertwitter janrecker

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