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Storytelling in Digital Service Design

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“Let me tell you a story….” – Storytelling, one of the most powerful ways to convey messages and a basic human need.

The workshop explores the role of storytelling in digital service design. With the constant rise of new emerging technologies, new challenges arise impacting various areas of design. Allowing for non-linear and more continuous experiences, the user is empowered to alter the course of the narrative and the way content is experienced and explored.

The static world of websites and apps is challenged by new technologies such as Google Cardboard, Oculus Rift, and connected devices, all of which require the creation of continuous, multi-routed storylines that Occulusinteraction Design is crafting and orchestrating, as interaction allows the user to be more deeply involved with the content the story thereof. Instead of presenting a linear feature, the user can follow various characters and affect the outcome of the story. This results in more dynamic stories and outcomes, captivating the user and enhancing the user experience.

A co-creation with Maria Lumiaho and Suvi Numminen, at Futurice.

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Storytelling in Digital Service Design

  1. 1. STORYTELLING IN DIGITAL SERVICE DESIGN Interaction 16 Workshop 1.3.2016
  2. 2. LEANSERVICECREATION Agenda •  2.00 – 2.20 INTRO •  2.20 – INSPIRATION / GROUP WORK •  Part 1 – Service Concept & Controlling Idea •  Part 2 – Hero •  3.30 Break •  3.40 – INSPIRATION / GROUP WORK •  Part 3 – Narrative •  Part 4 – Design Elements •  Part 5 – Group Presentation Prep •  4.50 Break •  5 – 6 PRESENTATIONS & WRAP UP
  3. 3. LEANSERVICECREATION We are Futurice A veeeeery short introduction
  4. 4. We create 
 digital services 
 for people to love Creating a culture that makes innovation happen Discovering and designing new digital services Developing, scaling and operating digital services
  5. 5. Way of working LEAN SERVICE CREATION
  6. 6. LSC is a multi-disciplinary way of working that maximizes the probability of creating successful digital services Lean Service Creation
  7. 7. LSC$SLIDE$HERE SERVICE VISION SPRINT TEAM : Business / Technology Design / End-Users BUSINESS NEED Improve Improve Improve LEAN SERVICE CREATION PROCESS FIND A PROBLEM WORTH SOLVING FINDING PRODUCT MARKET FIT GROWTH HACKING Days to Weeks Weeks to Months Months to Years NEW IDEAS SERVICE VISION MVP TO LAUNCH
  8. 8. Design at futurice TEAM / US
  9. 9. Design team Complex problems require broad thinkers and doers. 45 multi-disciplinary designers (business design, service design, concept design, brand design, UX/UI design, visual design, sound design. SERVICE DESIGN LEAD Maria Lumiaho maria.lumiaho@futurice.com @marialumiaho SENIOR SERVICE DESIGNER Jane Vita SENIOR SERVICE DESIGNER Suvi Numminen suvi.numminen@futurice.com jane.vita@futurice.com @janevita
  10. 10. THINK ABOUT THE SERVICES & PRODUCTS YOU USE Are there any that you … Are happy to pay a premium for even though another product would do the same job just fine? Go on and on about to your friends and don’t understand why they don’t want to use it, too? Are happy to use even if it doesn’t always work perfectly?
  11. 11. LEANSERVICECREATION There’s more to life than seeking solutions to problems
  12. 12. LEANSERVICECREATION We look for answers to big questions & seek meaningful experiences
  13. 13. LEANSERVICECREATION STORIES ARE A WAY OF TRYING TO UNDERSTAND THE WORLD AND WHAT IT MEANS TO BE HUMAN
  14. 14. LEANSERVICECREATION Can the experience of using a service be meaningful in the same way a story can?
  15. 15. YES! (IF IT’S DESIGNED TO DO SO)
  16. 16. LEANSERVICECREATION There are similarities between designing an experience and writing a story
  17. 17. LEANSERVICECREATION But also differences: The story a service creates is not linear and doesn’t deal with conflict the same way
  18. 18. LEANSERVICECREATION ALSO A DISCLAIMER Does not replace other service design methods, but useful as an additional lens Requires seamless collaboration between branding, service design & UX/UI design
  19. 19. Why we care about 
 storytelling in digital Service Design? Storytelling is all about experiences Storytelling about & inside the services we create Who doesn’t like a good story?
  20. 20. LET’S GET STARTED!
  21. 21. LEANSERVICECREATION 5 Groups
  22. 22. LEANSERVICECREATION Pick a service to work on •  Retail •  Fast food chain •  Travel / hospitality •  Going to / watching movies •  Banking •  …
  23. 23. 1) WHAT IS THE STORY ABOUT?
  24. 24. A GOOD STORY Has a clear reason to exist Makes a statement about the world Resonates with people who share those beliefs From “Story” by Robert McKee & “Start With Why” by Simon Sinek
  25. 25. LEANSERVICECREATION A good story can be distilled into a CONTROLLING IDEA From “Story” by Robert McKee
  26. 26. Example: The Lion King + Evil is defeated when you come to terms with your past and take responsibility
  27. 27. Example: The Lion King VALUE + Evil is defeated when you come to terms with your past and take responsibility CHANGE IN VALUE CAUSE Structure of a controlling idea from “Story” by Robert McKee
  28. 28. + Example: The Lord of the Rings VALUE Peace is restored when ordinary people have courage CHANGE IN VALUE CAUSE Structure of a controlling idea from “Story” by Robert McKee
  29. 29. Example: Coca-Cola VALUE Happiness ensues when you have special, refreshing moments CHANGE IN VALUE CAUSE Structure of a controlling idea from “Story” by Robert McKee
  30. 30. Example: Apple VALUE Life is more enjoyable when you do things differently CHANGE IN VALUE CAUSE Structure of a controlling idea from “Story” by Robert McKee
  31. 31. LEANSERVICECREATION Controlling ideas drive action and drive you to make decisions! “It’s about peace” is a theme, not a controlling idea From “Story” by Robert McKee
  32. 32. Should be based on customer insight & brand design Should be universal enough to be understood by most people Flexible enough to turn into a service, movie, game, whatever! Should be able to start a good conversation over beer Qualities of good controlling ideas
  33. 33. // CONFLICT DRIVES ACTION
  34. 34. LEANSERVICECREATION Story is not interesting without conflict Different levels of antagonistic forces try to win over the positive value From “Story” by Robert McKee
  35. 35. For example: Wisdom as the core value Positive value Wisdom Lack of positive value Stupidity disguised as wisdom Negative value Worst of the worst Ignorance Stupidity From “Story” by Robert McKee
  36. 36. For example: Love as the core value Positive value Love Lack of positive value Self-loathing Negative value Worst of the worst Indifference Hate From “Story” by Robert McKee
  37. 37. Positive value Justice Lack of positive value Injustice disguised as justice Negative value Worst of the worst Unfairness Injustice For example: Justice as the core value From “Story” by Robert McKee
  38. 38. // WHAT’S THE POINT?
  39. 39. LEANSERVICECREATION The controlling idea & changes in value act as the core of the service When designing any aspect, ask “does this support the controlling idea?”
  40. 40. LEANSERVICECREATION If the controlling idea is expressed clearly enough, it will resonate very strongly with users à users loving the service (even if they can’t tell why)
  41. 41. LEANSERVICECREATION Group Work
  42. 42. 2) THE HERO
  43. 43. // SOME BASIC RULES TO KEEP IN MIND
  44. 44. LEANSERVICECREATION YOUR SERVICE IS NOT THE MAIN CHARACTER
  45. 45. LEANSERVICECREATION -Chinese Proverb Tell me and I'll forget. Show me and I may remember. Involve me, and I'll understand.
  46. 46. LEANSERVICECREATION THE USER IS THE HERO From “Every Guest Is a Hero” by Adam M. Berger
  47. 47. LEANSERVICECREATION ‘USERS’ DON’T HAVE ADVENTURES Rebels, philosophers, guests, tricksters, hosts, antiheros and friends, dreamers do…
  48. 48. Crucial to know your users when defining the hero User’s role should be communicated clearly to them (marketing, landing pages, onboarding) The user must identify with the adventure the service is presenting ‘Who am I?’
  49. 49. Customers in Disneyland are called ‘guests’ The personnel is the ‘cast’ who work ‘onstage’ What you call your customers can make a subtle difference Example: Disneyland From “Be Our Guest” by Theodore B. Kinni“
  50. 50. Who is the user when using this service? “Who am I?”
  51. 51. LEANSERVICECREATION Group Work
  52. 52. LEANSERVICECREATION Agenda •  2.00 – 2.20 INTRO •  2.20 – INSPIRATION / GROUP WORK •  Part 1 – Service Concept & Controlling Idea •  Part 2 – Hero •  3.30 Break •  3.40 – INSPIRATION / GROUP WORK •  Part 3 – Narrative •  Part 4 – Design Elements •  Part 5 – Group Presentation Prep •  4.50 Break •  5 – 6 PRESENTATIONS & WRAP UP
  53. 53. LEANSERVICECREATION BREAK TIME!
  54. 54. 3) NARRATIVE
  55. 55. LEANSERVICECREATION What kind of experiences and functionality does the controlling idea suggest?
  56. 56. EXAMPLE CONTROLLING IDEA FOR A RECIPE SERVICE: “Life’s more fun when you can improvise and let go of fear of failing” WHAT IS ENCOURAGED? Experimentation Replacing ingredients (suggestions on/off) Sudden changes while cooking Stumbling upon new recipes Sharing the experience, giving new ideas to others Sharing and celebrating failures, too (hall of fame of bad/failed recipes) Fixing bad recipes, submitting your own version Seeking ideas from others (“what would you do with this?) WHAT IS DISCOURAGED / NOT ALLOWED MORE POSSIBILITIES Following recipes strictly Rating a recipe as good or bad (or stars etc.) Specific measurements in recipes Live-streaming while cooking: taking suggestions on the go from the crowd Recipes branching out with different variations Weekly challenges with mystery ingredients or theme Rating recipes based on how many new ideas you got Recipe rating based on how many new ideas you get from it Become a master of an ingredient (master of potato etc.) Different levels of recipes based on how vague vs. specific they are
  57. 57. LEANSERVICECREATION Functionality that isn’t aligned with the controlling idea will dilute it
  58. 58. // STRUCTURING THE STORY
  59. 59. LEANSERVICECREATION DESIGN FOR CLEAR BEGINNINGS, MIDDLES AND ENDINGS
  60. 60. LEANSERVICECREATION HAVING A CLEAR STRUCTURE FEELS GOOD MIDDLE ENDBEGINNING From “Poetics” by Aristotle and many more…
  61. 61. LEANSERVICECREATION WORKS BOTH ON THE ENTIRE SERVICE AND SINGLE TASKS SESSIONS ENTIRE LIFECYCLE OF USE SINGLE TASKS
  62. 62. LEANSERVICECREATION NOT ACTUALLY AND ARC, THOUGH, BUT MORE LIKE THIS From “The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses” by Jesse Schell
  63. 63. EXPOSITION EXPOSITION Introducing the protagonist, the world & status quo of the controlling idea Combining elements from “Story” by Robert McKee, Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey and Gustav Freytag’s Freytag's Pyramid
  64. 64. EXPOSITION INCITING INCIDENT INCITING INCIDENT Accepting a call to adventure à suddenly everything changes Entering a different world There’s no way back to the old Combining elements from “Story” by Robert McKee, Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey and Gustav Freytag’s Freytag's Pyramid
  65. 65. Setting & inciting incident Landing page & onboarding
  66. 66. EXPOSITION RISING ACTION INCITING INCIDENT Battle over the winning value gets more intense Being constantly surprised & feeding curiosity Showing affordances and foreshadowing RISING ACTION Battle over the winning value gets more intense Being constantly surprised & feeding curiosity Showing affordances and foreshadowing Providing breaks, too Combining elements from “Story” by Robert McKee, Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey and Gustav Freytag’s Freytag's Pyramid
  67. 67. LEANSERVICECREATION Surprises create emotional stamps that make up most of the memory of the experience From “The Service Startup” by Tenny Pinheiro
  68. 68. LEANSERVICECREATION Give people what they want but not the way they expect it From “Story” by Robert McKee
  69. 69. Creating delightful surprises during the journey
  70. 70. LEANSERVICECREATION Turn errors and inconveniences into opportunities to enforce the story
  71. 71. ‘Secret’ game in Chrome browser
  72. 72. Queuing areas in theme parks are designed to deepen the story They can also help to build excitement for the ride
  73. 73. EXPOSITION CLIMAX INCITING INCIDENT RISING ACTION The most dramatic moment, biggest conflict It all leads to this Inevitable, but must also be a choice Can’t go back CLIMAX Combining elements from “Story” by Robert McKee, Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey and Gustav Freytag’s Freytag's Pyramid
  74. 74. EXPOSITION RESOLUTION INCITING INCIDENT RISING ACTION Everything is different Showing how the world has changed Wrapping things up, removing confusion CLIMAX RESOLUTION Combining elements from “Story” by Robert McKee, Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey and Gustav Freytag’s Freytag's Pyramid
  75. 75. LEANSERVICECREATION Introducing the protagonist, the world & status quo of the controlling idea Accepting a call to adventure à suddenly everything changes Entering a different world There’s no way back to the old Battle over the winning value gets more intense Being constantly surprised & feeding curiosity Showing affordances and foreshadowing Providing breaks, too The most dramatic moment, biggest conflict It all leads to this Inevitable, but must also be a choice Can’t go back Everything is different Showing how the world has changed Wrapping things up, removing confusion INCITING INCIDENT CLIMAX EXPOSITION STRUCTURE OF THE STORY RISING ACTION RESOLUTION Combining elements from “Story” by Robert McKee, Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey and Gustav Freytag’s Freytag's Pyramid
  76. 76. LEANSERVICECREATION Group Work
  77. 77. 4) DESIGN ELEMENTS
  78. 78. BUILDING BLOCKS OF IMMERSIVE WORLDS THEMES & CONCEPT ASSOCIATIONS COLOR CONTRAST & VALUE SHAPE, COMPOSITION, FOCUS MOTION JUICINESS All aligned with the controlling idea
  79. 79. // THEME EXPLORATION
  80. 80. EXPLORING THEMES & CONCEPT ASSOCIATIONS 1)  What concepts, ideas & themes help make the controlling idea more concrete? 2)  What design motifs and symbols represent the theme & associations? From “The Immersive World Handbook” by Scott Lukas
  81. 81. Example for the recipe service with the controlling idea of “LIFE’S MORE FUN WHEN YOU CAN IMPROVISE AND LET GO OF FEAR OF FAILING” CONCEPT IDEAS MOTIF IDEAS Experimentation Laboratory (but not clinical)Explosions Smoke, burning Sprinkles (exploding) Excitement Joy Surprises Mystery present Mystery Thinking on your feet Living in the moment Laughing at yourself Ingredients Weird toolsPrototypes Nothing is ever final/done Bad ideas Celebration A world of possibilities Makeshift workspace Unconventional materials, texture Piles, mess Branching out, branches Stirring, whisks Veggies etc. that are not perfect
  82. 82. // COLOR & MOOD
  83. 83. LEANSERVICECREATION Passion Danger Optimism Joy Caution Life Growth Calmness Trustworthiness Cold MysteriousEnergy Vitality COLOR & MOOD Not that simple, though…
  84. 84. Context matters…
  85. 85. // CONTRAST & VALUE
  86. 86. Color values affect the mood High key – happy Low key – threatening Contrast – dramatic etc.
  87. 87. // SHAPE, COMPOSITION, FOCUS
  88. 88. Building a mood visually (composition, fonts, etc.) http://www.zevendesign.com/ mood-lines-giving-designs- attitude/ Originally from “Landscape Architecture” by John Ormsbee Simonds
  89. 89. Using scale & mass to create sense of awe and attract you towards something Scale, composition, focal points From “The Immersive World Handbook” by Scott Lukas
  90. 90. // MOTION
  91. 91. LEANSERVICECREATION MEANING OF MOTION Examples From “Landscape Architecture” by John Ormsbee Simonds HORIZONTAL MOTION Easy Free Visually interesting Easy to control Effortless movement DOWNWARD MOTION Hiding, digging in Confinement Protection Privacy Minimal effort UPWARD MOTION Exhilarating Sense of accomplishment Going up in life Detachment from earthly things Command, higher ground
  92. 92. // ’JUICINESS’
  93. 93. LEANSERVICECREATION ENGAGE AS MANY SENSES AS POSSIBLE WITH SOUND, TEXTURE, SMELL, TASTE, TEMPERATURE, BALANCE, ETC. REMEMBER THAT DIGITAL SERVICES HAVE A ‘FEEL’ TO USING THEM, TOO
  94. 94. Some things feel good to use and fiddle with. Different types of feedback make them feel ‘juicy’ to use.
  95. 95. Juiciness in action: ‘Game Feel - Why your death animation sucks’ https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=pmSAG51BybY More in “Game Feel: A Game Designer's Guide to Virtual Sensation” by Steve Swink
  96. 96. LEANSERVICECREATION Group Work
  97. 97. 5) PRESENTING YOUR STORY
  98. 98. LEANSERVICECREATION Different options for presenting the story: storyboards, customer journey, role playing etc. Pick one that suits your story
  99. 99. LEANSERVICECREATION Agenda •  2.00 – 2.20 INTRO •  2.20 – INSPIRATION / GROUP WORK •  Part 1 – Service Concept & Controlling Idea •  Part 2 – Hero •  3.30 Break •  3.40 – INSPIRATION / GROUP WORK •  Part 3 – Narrative •  Part 4 – Design Elements •  Part 5 – Group Presentation Prep •  4.50 Break •  5 – 6 PRESENTATIONS & WRAP UP
  100. 100. LEANSERVICECREATION BREAK TIME!
  101. 101. PRESENTATIONS
  102. 102. WRAP-UP
  103. 103. THE END

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