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Fairfax County Community Resiliency Group (CRG) Overview

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The Fairfax County Community Resilience Group brings together faith communities, safety-net nonprofits, civic associations, and private businesses collaborating to provide disaster recovery resources and capabilities in partnership with local government. Working collectively to leverage the available resources, these groups will allow each community, and therefore the county as a whole, recover rapidly and effectively after an emergency. Once the seminar and tabletop exercise series are completed, there will be a total of nine Community Resilience Groups (CRGs) within the county, one per magisterial district.

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Fairfax County Community Resiliency Group (CRG) Overview

  1. 1. Community Resiliency Group: Seminar
  2. 2. Introductions Sandi Fox: Community Outreach Manager, Fairfax County Office of Emergency Management Maria Bernadzikowski: Emergency Response Program Manager, Volunteer Fairfax Planning Committee: Fairfax County’s Office of Emergency Management, Volunteer Fairfax, Department of Neighborhood and Community Services, Faith Communities in Action, ECHO, Inc., and the Fairfax County Health Department
  3. 3. Why Are We Here? Purpose of a Community Resiliency Group (CRG):  To assist and coordinate with Volunteer Fairfax and the County  To help identify needs in our community  To provide resources and capabilities for community recovery after a disaster
  4. 4. ICS/EOC Organizational Chart EOC Commander Senior Policy Group Safety Officer EOC Chaplain Liaison Officer PIO Deputy EOC Commander Legal Counsel Operations Section Chief Infrastructure B/D Human Services B/D Public Safety B/D Finance Section Chief Reimbursement U/L Cost U/L Planning Section Chief Situation U/L Resources U/L Documentation U/L Demobilization U/L Field Observer WebEOC Specialist Status Specialist GIS Specialist Transit Group Vol/Donations MGMT Group Behavioral Health Mass Care Group Intel/Investigate Group Fire & Rescue Group Public Health Group Law Enforcement Group County Facilities Group Debris MGMT Group Public Works Group Damage Assessment Group Utilities Group Storm Water Tech Specialist Logistics Section Chief Food U/L Security U/L A/V Tech Specialist Information Tech U/L Support B/D Supply B/D Ares U/L Comm U/L Mission Tracking Spec Purchasing U/L Mission Tracking U/L GIS Doc DPWES DOCS Transit DOCS Facility DOCS Health DOC Fire/Rescue DOC DPSM Procurement DOC DPSM Warehouse DOC EOC = Emergency Operations Center
  5. 5. Operations Section: Org Chart
  6. 6. Volunteer Fairfax’s role 6 Community Voices Volunteers Donations Needs •Day to day: volunteer center mobilizing people and resources to meet community needs (1,000 nonprofits, public agencies and corporations) •During emergencies: -Volunteer and Donations Management -Spontaneous volunteer coordination (via Volunteer Reception Center) -Liaison between CRGs and the county
  7. 7. Volunteer & Donations Management Incident Occurs Identify Needs Receive Volunteers and DonationsManage Information Manage Logistics Educate the Public Coordinate with Donors and Volunteers
  8. 8. What is a CRG? A Community Resiliency Group (CRG) is a Fairfax County magisterial district level network of community groups who come together to communicate about and provide needed resources for their residents after a disaster. Community Resiliency Group (CRG)  Community Based Organizations (CBO)  Houses of Worship  Home Owner Associations (HOA), Civic Associations, Tenant Associations  Non-Profit Organizations/NGOs  Private Industry
  9. 9. Agenda 1. Phases of a disaster 2. Recovery 3. Roles a. Federal/State b. County c. Volunteer Fairfax d. Community partners 4. Community Resiliency Group
  10. 10. Phases of a Disaster Mitigation Preparedness Response Recovery Preventing future emergencies or minimizing their effects Preparing to handle an emergency Responding safely to an emergency Recovering from an emergency
  11. 11. Anatomy of Resiliency in Recovery 11 County Staff Notified to Report to EOC Response Recovery CRG members help to identify public needs : (Cleanup, food, clothing, etc.) Community Resiliency Group (CRG) engaged CRG communication begins
  12. 12. Where do we all fit in? And how can we work together to be more resilient?
  13. 13. County’s role 13  Coordination, Collaboration, Communication  Fairfax County Emergency Operations Center  Planning  Outreach  Finance
  14. 14. State and Federal Role
  15. 15. Police and Fire Role • First responders – will be working actively during the response phase • During a disaster, police officers and fire fighters play a key role in many operations including: search and rescue, evacuations, door-to- door checks, and maintaining overall public safety within the community. • Depending on the scale of disaster – they may be wrapped up into the recovery phase – will not be easily accessible - why you need to be a resilient community!
  16. 16. What’s Your Role as a CRG Member? • Helping us connect with resources and capabilities in times of disaster *Material Resources *Volunteers *Communication Networks *Coordination
  17. 17. Community Role Financi alFood Clea n Up Repairs Comm un- ication s Facility Clothi ng Transport Volunteers Coordination
  18. 18. Community-Based Organization (CBO) Communication - Utilize networks to obtain or disseminate information regarding the incident – Staff – Patrons – Volunteers – Partner organizations Resources – Utilize available resources to support community resiliency efforts – Office space – Transportation – Kitchen – Food supplies – Phone lines – Computers
  19. 19. Houses of Worship Communication – Utilize networks to obtain or disseminate information regarding the incident – Houses of Worship – Congregants Resources – Utilize available resources to support community resiliency efforts – Facility with large open area – Kitchen/Food – Transportation – Tables and chairs – Volunteers – Space/shelter
  20. 20. Homeowner, Civic, and Tenant Associations Communication - Utilize networks to obtain or disseminate information regarding the incident – Network of homeowners • Call upon residents to provide an “on the ground” status report of situation • Ability to call upon residents as potential volunteers Resources – Utilize available resources to support community resiliency efforts – Call for donations (ex: blankets, canned food, heaters, etc.) – Call for transportation (ex: 4x4 SUVs for snow)
  21. 21. Non-Profit Organizations/NGOs Communication - Utilize networks to obtain or disseminate information regarding the incident – Partner nonprofits – Staff – Volunteers Resources – Utilize available resources to support community resiliency efforts – Office space – Tables and chairs – Phone lines – Computers
  22. 22. Private Industry Communication - Utilize networks to obtain or disseminate information regarding the incident – Staff – Patrons Resources – Utilize available resources to support community resiliency efforts – Office space – Tables and chairs – Phone lines – Computers
  23. 23. Bringing it all Together
  24. 24. Flow of Communication
  25. 25. Goals for Community Resiliency Cooperation – We can’t recover alone. – Recognize the value of working together. Communication – Develop and maintain effective channels for sharing information, listen carefully to each other, and deal openly with concerns. Coordination – Commit to working together, in a coordinated manner. Collaboration – Share resources to obtain goals and actively work together to achieve shared goals.
  26. 26. Organizational preparedness 26 Make a Kit Make Plans Stay Informed Get Involved
  27. 27. Make Plans Communications Plan Shelter-in-Place Plan Evacuation Plan Have current phone numbers and email Use in case of a tornado watch or warning Identify alternate location(s) Key Organizational contacts Located away from windows and outside doors Plan your evacuation routes Alternate Meeting places Know where your main water and electric shut offs are located Leave a note on the door or pre-designated area Talk to staff about the plan Include emergency phone numbers Inform staff about plan/location Test plan and update every 6 months Practice the plan Practice the plan 27
  28. 28. Helping Each Other
  29. 29. Homework: • Talk to staff – get creative ! • Discuss what you’ve learned and bring it back to the community
  30. 30. Additional Resources Volunteer Fairfax– www.volunteerfairfax.org Faith Communities in Action - http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/dsm/cil/fcia.htm Fairfax County OEM - http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/oem/ Ready NOVA Preparedness Planners – www.ReadyNOVA.org Northern Virginia VOAD – contact@novavoad.org Fairfax County Citizen Corps – www.fairfaxcounty.gov/oem/citizencorps Virginia Department of Emergency Management – www.vaemergency.gov FEMA – www.ready.gov

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