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Library
Evaluations:
Community Involvement, On-going Improvement,
Results!
GailSanty
CentralKansasLibrarySystem
Why?
• Good management is based on good decision making. Good
decision making depends on good information and an
action or...
Objectives and Goals
• The Librarian and Board communicate the goals for
the evaluation with the Evaluation Team.
• What d...
Participatory evaluations
• Uncover potential issues by involving key players
in evaluation- staff at all levels, patrons,...
Who to recruit
• A good evaluation is inclusive, complete, and unbiased.
Differing viewpoints are welcomed and valued.
• U...
Create a Culture of
Evaluation
• A critical ingredient for developing and maintaining
momentum within your library is the ...
Accurate and complete
information
• Ensure that the Board and staff are committed to the
evaluation process and that they ...
Exterior
• Parking and sidewalk
• Landscaping, bike rack, flagpole
• Outside walls and front door
• Roof
• Building: hvac,...
Interior
• Attractive, clean, clear
• Lighting
• Signage
• Seating and flooring
• First impressions
Organization
• Cataloging
• Shelf and materials organization and location:
Neat, clean, condition, logical flow, spine
lab...
ADA
• Outside and parking
• Doors outside and inside
• Clear handicapped route inside
• Drinking fountains and restrooms
•...
Policies
• Do policies violate state law
• Are policies outdated
• Do policies have confusing wording
• Are any policies d...
Policies
• Consider these policies:
• Selection/Collection Management
• Building/Meeting Room Use
• Personnel
• Confidenti...
Policies
• Emergency Preparedness/Disaster Recovery
• Public Services
• Intellectual Freedom
• Budget and Finance
• Equipm...
Youth Services
• Friendly and welcoming to youth
• Adequate space for storage and programming
• Child-proof
• Furnishings:...
Computers
• Software up-to-date
• Working and clean peripherals
• Hard drives locked down
• Back up process and schedule f...
Extras
• Spreadsheets for librarians:
• Shelf Shuffler
• Collection Manager
• Data Collector
• Library Comparisons
http://...
Analyze the Findings
• Work with the Library Board and stakeholders to reach
a common understanding on findings, conclusio...
Prepare an action plan
• Work with the Library Board and other stakeholders to
prepare an action plan to improve where des...
References and
Resources
• Building Condition Manual
http://tinyurl.com/nejcxca
• Conducting a Participatory Evaluation
ht...
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Library Evaluations: Community Involvement, On-going Improvement, Results!

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Gail Santy speaks for Trustee Week.

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Library Evaluations: Community Involvement, On-going Improvement, Results!

  1. 1. Library Evaluations: Community Involvement, On-going Improvement, Results! GailSanty CentralKansasLibrarySystem
  2. 2. Why? • Good management is based on good decision making. Good decision making depends on good information and an action or strategic plan to move the library forward. • Take a good look at your organization from all angles. You will be able to you determine what works and what could be different. • A good evaluation is honest and brings a focus to the need for a healthy, vibrant library in your community. • The evaluation can be the launching point for a planned change effort. It can motivate a sluggish board or staff, or help a funder make better funding decisions.
  3. 3. Objectives and Goals • The Librarian and Board communicate the goals for the evaluation with the Evaluation Team. • What do you want for your library? • What does the community need the library to be?
  4. 4. Participatory evaluations • Uncover potential issues by involving key players in evaluation- staff at all levels, patrons, community members, library volunteers, Friends, city personnel. • Promote Evaluators learning about the library and its performance. Widen their point of view. • Mobilize stakeholders, enhance teamwork, and build shared commitment to act on evaluation recommendations.
  5. 5. Who to recruit • A good evaluation is inclusive, complete, and unbiased. Differing viewpoints are welcomed and valued. • Use sensitive, impartial, experienced, and skilled people to conduct the evaluation to get the best results. • Evaluators should possess an understanding of the library as an organization, industry knowledge, and building skills. Ideally an assessment team will have at several members to allow for a broader range of expertise and to complete coverage. • Involving your community in the evaluation improves credibility and increases awareness of the library’s strengths and challenges.
  6. 6. Create a Culture of Evaluation • A critical ingredient for developing and maintaining momentum within your library is the establishment of a positive, productive image of the evaluation and its use within your organization’s culture. • Involve appropriate staff in the development of evaluation. • Have staff regularly review, discuss, and act on evaluation findings. • Board members and top leadership own and act on the evaluation findings.
  7. 7. Accurate and complete information • Ensure that the Board and staff are committed to the evaluation process and that they provide honest, thoughtful information when queried. • Select Evaluators who inspire confidence in your community and assure impartiality throughout the process. • Be transparent about what information will be shared, with whom it will be shared, and how the findings will be used to move the library forward.
  8. 8. Exterior • Parking and sidewalk • Landscaping, bike rack, flagpole • Outside walls and front door • Roof • Building: hvac, safety systems, exits, structurally sound
  9. 9. Interior • Attractive, clean, clear • Lighting • Signage • Seating and flooring • First impressions
  10. 10. Organization • Cataloging • Shelf and materials organization and location: Neat, clean, condition, logical flow, spine labels, signage for collections and end panels • Collection age: Technology, law, medicine, local history/genealogy • Display
  11. 11. ADA • Outside and parking • Doors outside and inside • Clear handicapped route inside • Drinking fountains and restrooms • Stack aisles and furniture
  12. 12. Policies • Do policies violate state law • Are policies outdated • Do policies have confusing wording • Are any policies difficult to implement • Do any policies seem overly restrictive
  13. 13. Policies • Consider these policies: • Selection/Collection Management • Building/Meeting Room Use • Personnel • Confidentiality of Library Records • Gifts and Donations • Appropriate Use of Online Services • Continuing Education
  14. 14. Policies • Emergency Preparedness/Disaster Recovery • Public Services • Intellectual Freedom • Budget and Finance • Equipment Use • Patron Behavior • Capital Improvements • Surplus Property
  15. 15. Youth Services • Friendly and welcoming to youth • Adequate space for storage and programming • Child-proof • Furnishings: chairs, tables, shelving, seating • Collaborates with local entities to provide programs for youth
  16. 16. Computers • Software up-to-date • Working and clean peripherals • Hard drives locked down • Back up process and schedule for updating • Furniture, printers, cables, networking
  17. 17. Extras • Spreadsheets for librarians: • Shelf Shuffler • Collection Manager • Data Collector • Library Comparisons http://spreadsheetsforlibrarians.blogspot.com/
  18. 18. Analyze the Findings • Work with the Library Board and stakeholders to reach a common understanding on findings, conclusions, and recommendations. • The common understanding becomes the cornerstone for a group commitment to a plan of action.
  19. 19. Prepare an action plan • Work with the Library Board and other stakeholders to prepare an action plan to improve where desired and needed. • This turns the evaluation and any possible weaknesses into positive action steps. • Librarians and Library Boards become agents of change and apply their new knowledge into action steps to improve the library on many levels.
  20. 20. References and Resources • Building Condition Manual http://tinyurl.com/nejcxca • Conducting a Participatory Evaluation http://tinyurl.com/mvfj5dh • Create a Culture of Evaluation http://tinyurl.com/asx7obb • Six Keys to Successful Organizational Assessment http://tinyurl.com/kd3ezou

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