Better Outcomes Through Varied &    Adaptive Training for Games &             SimulationsJamie Pina, PhD, MSPHResearch Sci...
What I’m Playing...             www.gamesforhealth.org
Today I’ll talk about:1.   My story2.   Gaming and simulation3.   Assessment in simulated training4.   A template for gett...
www.gamesforhealth.org
A game consists of 4 components  1.   Goal  2.   Rules  3.   Feedback System  4.   Voluntary Participation                ...
Training often lacks an important           component:  1.   Goal                      Participation alone is not         ...
Training demands assessmentUnderstanding              What does the student know                           how to do?parti...
Simulation based training            Simulated vignettes               are used to teach               participants skills...
Skill transference      www.gamesforhealth.org
The real world is not pretty1. Ill-structured2. Unpredictable3. Noisy               www.gamesforhealth.org
Designing with skill transference  in mind (getting coverage)  The following six parameters can be     modified to help th...
Temporal factorsTime fidelityTime pressure                www.gamesforhealth.org
Sequencing AberrationsErrors of omissionErrors of commissionErrors of sequence              www.gamesforhealth.org
Incomplete informationParticipant must complete a task   without adequate information              www.gamesforhealth.org
Tool variability and functionUsed properlyProper selectionAvailability               www.gamesforhealth.org
Variation of actorsPresenceNumberBehaviorParticipant response                 www.gamesforhealth.org
Environmental DistractionsBackground activityControl responsiveness              www.gamesforhealth.org
ImplicationsThese parameter modifications can be incorporated intofuture designs to achieve breadth of the trainingsimulat...
Conclusions…Thank you!Coverage in simulated training is crucial to skilltransference.Performance must reflect real-world e...
For more information…Jamie Pina, PhD, MSPH                     Robert Hubal, PhDResearch Scientist                        ...
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Better Outcomes Through Varied & Adaptive Training for Games & Simulations

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Not all of the games produced through the serious games initiative meet the adaptive assessment demands of simulation-based training. Simulation-based training aims to provide students with real-world capabilities acquired and practiced in a simulated environment. However, real-world working conditions may be ill-structured and unpredictable; students must be prepared to adapt their skills to a changing environment, and a training environment must be able to employ adaptive performance metrics. One approach to developing this adaptive capability in students is to situate them into multiple simulated contexts, with different tasks to perform under various conditions to specified standards, and with the aggregate of training situations adequately covering the space of real-world situations. This presentation will describe game design templating for developing sufficiently varying simulated tasks to ensure that the simulated training environment meets real-world adaptive needs.

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Better Outcomes Through Varied & Adaptive Training for Games & Simulations

  1. 1. Better Outcomes Through Varied & Adaptive Training for Games & SimulationsJamie Pina, PhD, MSPHResearch ScientistCenter for the Advancement of Health ITRobert Hubal, PhDSenior Research PsychologistSubstance Abuse Epidemiology and Military Behavioral Health www.gamesforhealth.org
  2. 2. What I’m Playing... www.gamesforhealth.org
  3. 3. Today I’ll talk about:1. My story2. Gaming and simulation3. Assessment in simulated training4. A template for getting good coverage of a learning area in simulated training environments www.gamesforhealth.org
  4. 4. www.gamesforhealth.org
  5. 5. A game consists of 4 components 1. Goal 2. Rules 3. Feedback System 4. Voluntary Participation www.gamesforhealth.org
  6. 6. Training often lacks an important component: 1. Goal Participation alone is not the desired outcome. 2. Rules 3. Feedback System 4. Voluntary Participation www.gamesforhealth.org
  7. 7. Training demands assessmentUnderstanding What does the student know how to do?participantprogress is key to In what context?the success of thetraining www.gamesforhealth.org
  8. 8. Simulation based training Simulated vignettes are used to teach participants skills and measure their capabilities. www.gamesforhealth.org
  9. 9. Skill transference www.gamesforhealth.org
  10. 10. The real world is not pretty1. Ill-structured2. Unpredictable3. Noisy www.gamesforhealth.org
  11. 11. Designing with skill transference in mind (getting coverage) The following six parameters can be modified to help the simulated environment be as challenging as the real world. www.gamesforhealth.org
  12. 12. Temporal factorsTime fidelityTime pressure www.gamesforhealth.org
  13. 13. Sequencing AberrationsErrors of omissionErrors of commissionErrors of sequence www.gamesforhealth.org
  14. 14. Incomplete informationParticipant must complete a task without adequate information www.gamesforhealth.org
  15. 15. Tool variability and functionUsed properlyProper selectionAvailability www.gamesforhealth.org
  16. 16. Variation of actorsPresenceNumberBehaviorParticipant response www.gamesforhealth.org
  17. 17. Environmental DistractionsBackground activityControl responsiveness www.gamesforhealth.org
  18. 18. ImplicationsThese parameter modifications can be incorporated intofuture designs to achieve breadth of the trainingsimulation.They can be used as heuristics to evaluate current designs. www.gamesforhealth.org
  19. 19. Conclusions…Thank you!Coverage in simulated training is crucial to skilltransference.Performance must reflect real-world environments.Modifying simulations using this template canprovide a foundation for better development www.gamesforhealth.org
  20. 20. For more information…Jamie Pina, PhD, MSPH Robert Hubal, PhDResearch Scientist Senior Research PsychologistCenter for the Advancement of Health IT Substance Abuse Epidemiology andRTI International Military Behavioral Healthjpina@rti.org rhubal@rti.org781-434-1778 919-541-6045Skype: jamie.pina.rti www.gamesforhealth.org

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