Negative Aspects of Technology
Financial Costs
The Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)  <ul><li>TCO is split into two types of expenses: direct and indirect. </li></ul><ul><li...
Total Cost of Ownership $218 Thousand $81 Thousand 450 Missouri $34 Million $11 Million 35,000 Texas $223 Million $89 Mill...
Costs of Technology Standard 7 The cost of integrating technology into schools effects Standard 7 as research has shown th...
Teacher’s Attitudes
A Study of Mathematics Web-Based Learning in Schools <ul><li>When asked about their reasons for not using technological so...
<ul><li>Four points must be considered by technologists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recognition of teachers’ needs for technolo...
&quot; Elementary students do not have the necessary knowledge or skills to independently use the Internet in a safe manne...
Technology blocking systems don't work <ul><ul><li>cannot block everything  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>not always availabl...
Learning to Use vs. Using to Learn <ul><ul><li>70% of technology used in schools = LITERACY </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li...
No Time,  No Money,  No Tech
 
No Time, No Money, No Tech <ul><ul><li>Training  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Valuable time </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul>...
<ul><li>    </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>...
Lack of a Plan    ---- Can lead to this----- Not enough data drops No electrical outlets Can't connect to the Network Soft...
  “ there's clearly an ever-increasing amount of software out there, and happily, it's not all drivel.”          The quest...
Digital       Divide                     
Safety
Bugs <ul><ul><li>With technology in the classroom, there will be some bugs to over come… regularly!   </li></ul></ul><ul><...
Is There Really Time to Deal With The Glitch Issues? (as if teachers don’t have enough to do) <ul><li>Preparation and Flex...
Questions of Equality <ul><ul><li>Low Income Families Don’t Have the Money to Have Certain Technologies At Home. </li></ul...
<ul><li>Starr, Linda. &quot;How Can We Eliminate Roadblocks to the Information  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Highway?.&quot;  Edu...
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Anti Tech Power Point[1]

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  • There are many negative aspects of integrating technology into the schools. One of the foremost concern is the financial cost of implementing the technology into classrooms. The following slides will outline the costs associated with integrating technology into schools.
  • TCO is split into two types of expenses: direct and indirect. Direct IT expenses are those items that are typically budgeted such as hardware, software, management labor, operations labor, updates, development and communication fees. Indirect fees include items that are not budgeted and often go unaccounted for in most organizations including end user self and peer support, casual learning, and productivity losses due to downtime.
  • Last year, a suburban school district in Virginia spent about $89 million for technology hardware, software and labor dedicated to managing technical systems. But, a host of harder to calculate indirect costs raised the total cost to own technology for the 166,000-student district to approximately $233 million. Similarly, a suburban Texas district with 35,000 students paid about $11 million in direct costs for technology and associated labor last year. But, $23 million in indirect costs drove total spending up to $34 million. Finally, a tiny rural district in Missouri acquired computers for its 450 students by spending $81,000 directly and $137,000 indirectly, for a total of approximately $218,000. While the three districts differed dramatically — from large to small, from suburban to rural — each found that the total cost of ownership (TCO) for technology was two-and-one-half to three times the direct cost of hardware, software and dedicated labor. In other words, for every dollar spent on direct costs, another dollar or two was spent indirectly
  • Barriers such as the total cost of ownership of information technology systems, the initial infrastructure investment required to get systems up and running, as well as the ongoing lack of financial and human resources have all contributed to slowing the implementation of technology in K-12 education. These concerns are magnified in smaller or rural schools.
  • Emergence into the 21st century features tools that are different, communication that is different, information that is different and work that is different. However, how teachers learned their subject matter is not necessarily the way their students will need to be taught in the 21st century. Learning subject matter with technology is different from learning to teach that subject matter with technology. In this particular study, Teachers agreed that schools need to have an awareness program for teaching Mathematics with technology. This includes sending teachers to workshops or seminars to experience the technology before they introduce it into their classroom, and providing them with adequate time to learn how to use the programs.
  • Recognition of teachers’ perceived needs is crucial to a design process focused on restructuring classrooms. Consider the knowledge of the teacher and the classroom setting in which the technology is to be implemented. The needs, wants, and desires of teachers must be considered by technologists when developing programs to Teachers to use within their practice. Educators must be trained to use the technology they are expected to teach with.
  • &amp;quot;Elementary students do not have the necessary knowledge or skills to independently use the Internet in a safe manner.&amp;quot; This can range from the &amp;quot;not-so-serious&amp;quot;...... do not know how to aviod &amp;quot;internet garbage&amp;quot; While surfing around the Internet you pick up a lot of useless files. They go into a cache and are supposed to make your Web pages load faster. Whether you use Internet Explorer or Firefox you pick up these files every time you surf. Stdeunts have no idea that this exists and often cannot erase or prevent this from happening at all.    do not understand &amp;quot;mouse-napping&amp;quot;     can not process the difference between internet scams and legitimate material   students are bombarded with materialistic values
  • Technology blocking systems don&apos;t work Just as a fenced in play yard is not appropriate for tenn agers blocking systems are not appropriate when teaching internet use, however the amount of inappropriate materail can be overwhelming for teachers and admin cannot block everything not always available use does not teach students how to function is a real world environment young people will be more vulnerable -- and at greater risk -- at those inevitable times when they have open access to the Internet. schools turn over control to a third party  
  • According research done by the University of California, more than 70 percent of technology used in schools today focuses on &amp;quot;literacy&amp;quot;  — emphasis is on the tool.   Talk to the majority of parents and teachers alike and you&apos;ll hear the same thing:  my kids (or my students) know more about technology than I do.  So research has found that the largest emphasis is on &amp;quot;literacy&amp;quot; yet we acknowledge that many students are already   literate (more literate than their teachers in some cases).  How is this data supporting that our student&apos;s needs are being met?    Just over 25 percent of the emphasis is placed on &amp;quot;integration&amp;quot; uses — where the focus is to use the tool to reinforce everyday practices.   Although it is certainly not a poor practice to integrate technology, it may not be best practice all of the time--especially if the integration involves video-game-like reinforcement of learning.  Then perhaps it is merely entertainment.   Less than 5% is focused on &amp;quot;transformative&amp;quot; technology--using technology to really change the way students learn and the way teachers teach and assess.   Perhaps technology is used so infrequently in this way because teachers don&apos;t know how to change the way they teach by using technology.   What might be lacking for teachers to be lagging behind in this area as our world jumps ahead?  (segway to next slide...What Teachers Need)      
  •   Many teachers are already familiar with the basics of technology like using the Microsoft Word program to create a document or performing an internet search using the Google search engines.  However many are not comfortable using technology to teach .    In order to gain the necessary knowledge and skills needed to become effective using technology, teachers need three things:  training, the opportunity to practice, and the opportunity to plan and develop lessons that integrate technology.   Many districts recognize the value of technology and are happy to stretch their budgets to purchase technological innovations.  However, the budgets must be stretched even further in order for teachers to effectively use the technology. Professional development does not come without a price. Advocates of technology in the classroom might suggest solutions such as hire technology coordinators, or select mentor teachers within the schools, but again these solutions still translate into both time and money.  The bottom line is that training teachers takes time and money, neither of which is abundant in the school setting.    Just like students, teachers need time to practice their knew knowledge.  Perhaps they do receive training, but a day or two of professional development does not necessarily prepare them to walk into their classrooms and use the technology with ease or expertise.   Again, time is needed in order for teachers to get comfortable using technology.  Districts should not expect teachers to find this time on their own.  With all of the responsibilities that teachers have, they are not going to find time to practice, they are going to have to be given time to practice.      Only when teachers have a level of comfort with a technology tool can they begin to integrate that technology into their teaching.  This, too, will take a certain amount to time as teachers revise their past lessons or develop completely new ones.    The necessity of time is a common thread for all three of these teachers needs.  Without it, the integration of technology will most certainly lag behind.
  • WWe&apos;ve all been told instructional technology is a good thing. Considerable resources are poured into &amp;quot;wiring&amp;quot; our classroms and our courses, but how would using a laptop, PowerPoint, and computer projection be necessarily more effective than an overhead? Or what are the benefits of Blackboard?      SStart simple: Effective use of some technology is better than haphazard use of impressive gadgets.  Weigh the pros and cons with the time to be spent integrating technology in the classroom.            
  • So many times we hear from administrators about new software purchases.  These plans are made without consulting the tech department.  And when tje tech department begins to investigate (many times after the purchase) they find that the software doesn’t run on the computers.    Calls come in from the buildings: &amp;quot;why can&apos;t we run the LCD projector, the new flip-camera videos won&apos;t run, or the wireless mice won’t work&amp;quot;—all very costly mistakes.  
  • Due to the current economic situation in our country public schools are faced with major financial cut backs. The public School Technology Departments within districts are becoming smaller.  At one time when these tech departments were flush with experience and there was time to research and pour over software and new technology trends.   With the lack of funding the amount of time available to select software or equipment is limited.   Coupled with the time issue is the fact that there is an abundance of new software available for educators.  Technology trends for the classroom change constantly.  Without a trained staff, or the ability to spend time, ineffective purchases will be made.    
  • Technology bugs occur on a regular basis. These issues go beyond the simple things that can be fixed by just restarting your computer. Technology glitches (or bugs  ) are inevitable and cannot be avoided. Teachers are always told to be prepared and very flexible, but how much more prepared can we be? We plan for hours, trying to create the perfect lesson plan that integrates the use of technology into our curriculum, walk into work incredibly confident ready to begin today’s project and then… POOF… a computer has crashed, the internet server is down,  the website you planned to use is going through routine maintenance, the batteries in the digital camera arent charged, students cannot log onto the computers because their accounts aren’t properly mapped, the list goes on and on and on. These bugs are very difficult to overcome and bring on a great deal of improvisation and frustration!  
  •   When Glitches or bugs arise it’s easy to say, “Just fix them by trying what you know about the technology being used or by updating or reinstalling a program.” In most school districts, teachers aren’t allowed to just “fix” the problems. They are to contact the technology department and wait for them to fix the problem (which could be hours, days, or even weeks). They are told to check the peripherals…. THE WHAT??? We arent trained on the “techie talk” that we are expected to understand. Teachers aren’t given enough planning time to even prepare for incidents like this. When integrating technology into the curriculum teachers always have to have a back up plan. As I said before, “Teachers hardly have enough time in the day to plan and teach their current curriculum, let alone have a back up lesson plan ready to go if a technology glitch were to occur. It’s a lot to ask and most teachers will just skip out on integrating the technology and just teach their lessons the old fashion way. When the technology glitches arise, are there staff members at arms reach that can help you and actually know what they are talking about? Again, the time issue arises again. Most staff members are not trained on the technologies that could be utilized in the classroom due to time constraints. So how can we be expected to deal with the issues that arise. Many of the “dinosaurs (as what these non techie staff members have been referred to in CEP 810) are happy with just forgetting about technology altogether. There just isn&apos;t any time!  
  •   With our economy continuing to decline, teachers struggle with setting expectations for students to use technology in their classroom AND at home. Many parents are jobless. They don’t have a home phone that works, let alone a computer or digital camera. Teachers have to be careful when they set their technology requirements. Many families don’t have computers in their home and are still using 35 mm cameras to take pictures. How can teachers be required to have students complete assignments that integrate technology when it’s not utilized at home? I can’t tell you how many times I have asked students to type out a story they are writing at home. Their parents email me their story in a program that is no longer a supported program because it is so out of date. These are problems that add to a teachers frustration and frankly, we don’t have the time to deal with it. Schools and teachers require students to purchase technological supplies to use in the classroom such as head phones and calculators. If schools can’t afford to supply students with these materials, how could we think for one minute that families in today’s economy can afford to purchase them? You also have to look at the education of many parents. Today, many parents are uneducated in the areas of technology. With regards to this, districts and classroom teachers just shrug their shoulders. Again, the time and money issues come up. There just isn&apos;t the time or the money anymore to educate parents and now we are expected to educate our students? It’s a lot for a teacher to take on.  
  • Anti Tech Power Point[1]

    1. 1. Negative Aspects of Technology
    2. 2. Financial Costs
    3. 3. The Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) <ul><li>TCO is split into two types of expenses: direct and indirect. </li></ul><ul><li>Direct IT expenses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hardware/ Software </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Management/ Operations labor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Development and communication fees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Updates/ Subscription renewal fees </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Indirect IT expenses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>End user costs (peer and self support, and casual learning and). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Downtime (lost productivity due to planned and unplanned outages). </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Total Cost of Ownership $218 Thousand $81 Thousand 450 Missouri $34 Million $11 Million 35,000 Texas $223 Million $89 Million 166,000 Virginia Cost after Indirect Costs ( end user self and peer support, casual learning, and productivity losses due to downtime) Initial Cost ( hardware, software and labor dedicated to managing technical systems) Number of Students Location
    5. 5. Costs of Technology Standard 7 The cost of integrating technology into schools effects Standard 7 as research has shown the cost of using technology to enhance learning is in most cases too high for already suffering school boards. These costs do not include ongoing technical upgrades.
    6. 6. Teacher’s Attitudes
    7. 7. A Study of Mathematics Web-Based Learning in Schools <ul><li>When asked about their reasons for not using technological software in their classrooms, the most common reasons Teachers quoted were: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The software is expensive- Who is going to pay for it? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The software is difficult to find- How do I know what is appropriate? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers not taught how to use the programs, and expected to learn on their own time- Who is going to provide me with support if I need it? </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>Four points must be considered by technologists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recognition of teachers’ needs for technology. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider technical knowledge of teacher and classroom setting. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The needs, wants, and desires of teachers when developing/selecting software. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adequate training for Teachers to use and understand the technology and software programs. </li></ul></ul>Successfully Integrating Technology into Classrooms Standard 7: Teacher’s attitudes effect Standard 7 as it states “An ability to use information technology to enhance learning and to enhance personal and professional productivity.” If teachers are not being trained on the technology within their classrooms and do not fully understand how to use it appropriately, learning will not be enhanced, and their professional productivity will be negatively affected.
    9. 9. &quot; Elementary students do not have the necessary knowledge or skills to independently use the Internet in a safe manner.&quot; <ul><ul><li>do not know how to aviod &quot;internet garbage&quot; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>  do not understand &quot;mouse-napping&quot; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>  can not process the difference between internet scams and legitimate material </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>students are bombarded with materialistic values </li></ul></ul>This can range from the &quot;not-so-serious&quot;...... <ul><ul><li>Have they learned safe communication skills? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>how to protect their personal privacy? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>how to recognize, deal with, and report sexual solicitation? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do they know how to protect themselves from Internet scams and how to look out for problems of Internet addiction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do they know how to recognize and avoid disrespectful and harmful online material? </li></ul></ul>To the very serious...
    10. 10. Technology blocking systems don't work <ul><ul><li>cannot block everything </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>not always available </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>use does not teach students how to function is a real world environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>young people will be more vulnerable -- and at greater risk -- at those inevitable times when they have open access to the Internet. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>schools turn over control to a third party </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    11. 11. Learning to Use vs. Using to Learn <ul><ul><li>70% of technology used in schools = LITERACY </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>emphasis on tool </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>many students already literate </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>25% of technology used in schools = INTEGRATION </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>reinforce everyday learning </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>useful, fun </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>5% of technology used in schools = TRANSFORMATIVE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>change the way teachers teach & students learn </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>teachers should be trained better in this use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    12. 12. No Time, No Money, No Tech
    13. 14. No Time, No Money, No Tech <ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Valuable time </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Time = $$ </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning/practicing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Training is not equal to knowledge/expertise </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Time for practice/knowledge expansion </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning/developing lessons </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Effort </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul></ul></ul>
    14. 15. <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>It is important to consider how new instructional technologies can improve our ability to teach well and significantly improve student learning.” </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.uoregon.edu/~tep/resources/newteach/technology.html </li></ul>  Utilization of owned Technology
    15. 16. Lack of a Plan    ---- Can lead to this----- Not enough data drops No electrical outlets Can't connect to the Network Software will not run Lack room in the buildings  
    16. 17.   “ there's clearly an ever-increasing amount of software out there, and happily, it's not all drivel.”       The question is ~  how much drivel do school districts invest in, and how could that money be better spent?
    17. 18. Digital       Divide                     
    18. 19. Safety
    19. 20. Bugs <ul><ul><li>With technology in the classroom, there will be some bugs to over come… regularly! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Computers Crash </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Internet Server is Down </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Local Website Maintenance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Batteries Aren't Charged </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Accounts Not Properly Mapped </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The List Goes On and On and On… </li></ul></ul></ul>Grinvalds, Jeff. &quot;Technology in the Classroom: How to Reduce the Glitches.&quot; National Writing Project Feb 2007 Web.20 Apr 2009. <http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/resource/2382>.
    20. 21. Is There Really Time to Deal With The Glitch Issues? (as if teachers don’t have enough to do) <ul><li>Preparation and Flexibility </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Teachers ALWAYS have to have a back up plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask For Help </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are their reliable resources in your place of work? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Check and Double Check all Peripherals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers should always have back ups! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Techie Talk </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowing what’s compatible and make sure you always upgrade!... WHAT??? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where’s the Time??? </li></ul></ul>Grinvalds, Jeff. &quot;Technology in the Classroom: How to Reduce the Glitches.&quot; National Writing Project Feb 2007 Web.20 Apr 2009. <http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/resource/2382>.
    21. 22. Questions of Equality <ul><ul><li>Low Income Families Don’t Have the Money to Have Certain Technologies At Home. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many Schools Require Students to Purchase Certain Technologies. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Students can’t afford what is required </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>School district cannot offer help or support </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Software at home isn’t compatible with school software </li></ul></ul></ul>Starr, Linda. &quot;How Can We Eliminate Roadblocks to the Information Highway?.&quot; Education World . 21 Feb. 2000. 20 Apr 2009 <http://www.education-world.com/a_tech/tech009.shtml>.
    22. 23. <ul><li>Starr, Linda. &quot;How Can We Eliminate Roadblocks to the Information </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Highway?.&quot; Education World 21 Feb 2000 Web.18 Apr 2009.  <http://www.education-world.com/a_tech/tech009.shtml>. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Jukes, Ian and Alan Warhaftig. &quot;The Technology Debate: Optimism or </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Caution?.&quot; Scholastic Administr@tor Spring 2002 Web.03 Apr 2009. http://content.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=453 . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Willard, Nancy. &quot;Keeping Kids Safe Online.&quot; Education World 03212007 Web.23 Apr 2009. <http://www.education-world.com/a_tech/tech119.shtml>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>  </li></ul></ul>  Starr, Linda. &quot;How Can We Eliminate Roadblocks to the Information Highway?.&quot; Education World . 21 Feb. 2000. 20 Apr 2009 http://www.education-world.com/a_tech/tech009.shtml .     Grinvalds, Jeff. &quot;Technology in the Classroom: How to Reduce the Glitches.&quot; National Writing Project Feb 2007 Web.20 Apr 2009. <http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/resource/2382>.

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