Leveraging Social Media to Grow Your Business

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This social media introduction is perfect for small businesses trying to understand the impact of social media and how best to leverage it to grow business.

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Leveraging Social Media to Grow Your Business

  1. 1. Leveraging Social Media to Grow Your Business James Windrow, Director of Interactive MarketingPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  2. 2. Social Media Social Media Tools Blogs Wikis • Opinion, news, expertise, updates, • Collaboration, registration, multiparty ‘voice’ authorship Social networks Social aggregators • Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace • FriendFeed, Ping.fm • Bring all your social media together Microblogging • Twitter, Jaiku, Plurk, Pownce Social bookmarking • 150 characters or less • Delicious, Digg, StumbleUpon, Technorati • Sharing and rating of content MultiMedia YouTube, Flickr, Vimeo, vSocial Important: Its about finding the right fit.Presentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  3. 3. Social Media Expectations are critical. It’s NOT ABOUT: It IS ABOUT: Sending people to your website Engaging with people on their terms Broadcasting messages Establishing a dialogue Moderating content Monitoring content Set it and forget it Constant involvement One size fits all Finding a good fitPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  4. 4. How do you determine the best fit? 1. What are your objectives? 2. Who is your audience?Presentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  5. 5. What Are Your Objectives? Research Listening Ongoing monitoring of your customers’ conversations with each other, instead of occasional surveys and focus groups. Marketing Talking Participating in and stimulating two-way conversations your customers have with each other, not just outbound communications to your customers. Sales Energizing Making it possible for your enthusiastic customers to help sell each other. Support Supporting Enabling your customers to support each other. Developmen Embracing Helping your customers work with each other to t come up with ideas to improve your products and services.Presentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  6. 6. Research Ongoing monitoring of your customers’ conversations with each other, instead of occasional surveys and focus groups.Presentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  7. 7. Marketing Participating in and stimulating two-way conversations your customers have with each other, not just outbound communications to your customers.Presentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  8. 8. Sales Making it possible for your enthusiastic customers to help sell each other..Presentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  9. 9. Support Enabling your customers to support each other.Presentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  10. 10. Development Helping your customers work with each other to come up with ideas to improve your products and services. - Discussions Groups - Private - Public - Blogs - Ratings - E.g. eBags provides feedback to vendorsPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  11. 11. Your Audience ® Social Technographic Profile • Companies often approach Social Computing as a list of technologies to be deployed as needed — a blog here, a podcast there — to achieve a marketing goal. • But a more coherent approach is to start with your target audience and determine what kind of relationship you want to build with them, based on what they are ready to participate in. • Forresters Social Technographics® profile classifies consumers into six overlapping levels of participation. • Concentrate on the relationships, not the technologies.Presentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  12. 12. Grouping Consumers By How They Participate High Source: Groundswell, Forrester ResearchPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  13. 13. Grouping Consumers By How They Participate High Source: Groundswell, Forrester ResearchPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  14. 14. Grouping Consumers By How They Participate High Source: Groundswell, Forrester ResearchPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  15. 15. Grouping Consumers By How They Participate High Source: Groundswell, Forrester ResearchPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  16. 16. Grouping Consumers By How They Participate High Source: Groundswell, Forrester ResearchPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  17. 17. Grouping Consumers By How They Participate High Source: Groundswell, Forrester ResearchPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  18. 18. The Social Technographic Profile of US Online AdultsPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  19. 19. Social Search 45.13% 6.63% 15.69% 14.41% comScore Releases July 2008 U.S. Search Engine RankingsPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  20. 20. Social Search – Universal SearchPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  21. 21. Social Networking - LinkedInPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  22. 22. Social Networking - LinkedInPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  23. 23. Social Networking - LinkedIn 38% of companies use LinkedIn to research prospective and current vendors, partners and clients. LinkedIn, Anderson Analytics and SPSS. 2009Presentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  24. 24. Social BookmarkingPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  25. 25. Social BookmarkingPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow
  26. 26. Social BookmarkingPresentation Date: July 2009 James Windrow

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