The wonderful, fun world of the depression

659 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
659
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
446
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The wonderful, fun world of the depression

  1. 1. The depression of the 1930s, most commonly referred to as the Great Depression, was international in scope and not limited to the American experience Wake Up Call!!!
  2. 2. It actually began in Europe because of: Severe damages from World War I so everything had to be rebuilt. The heavy reparations Germany had to pay for the war. Germany couldn’t repay the Allies who needed the money to rebuild. How does the Depression Start? Belgium 1915
  3. 3. The War’s Effect on the Job Market Although spending to fund the war had nearly bankrupted several countries, employment had been high because countries were building things for the soldiers. As soldiers returned home from fighting, some soldiers found that their bosses had given their jobs away. Others took their jobs back from replacements.
  4. 4. Unfortunately, the Allies did not realize how important Germany was to the European economy. Trade and production all over Europe suffered due to a weak Germany. Remember the Allied goal was to punish Germany? They succeeded! Reparations took what little money Germany had available. Also, in the Treaty of Versailles, they had been forced to give up valuable land, willed with natural resources and factories. Germany hit the hardest!
  5. 5. So Germany continued printing more money with no real value, creating hyperinflation. In 1923, France took Germany’s major industrial region, the Ruhr Valley, as further payment of the war debt. The French Strike Again!
  6. 6. Due to the economic problems and their need to rebuild, European countries stopped investing and buying from other countries (including us). This hurt those countries’ economies. What about the United States?

×