E-CONCEPTS / E-DESIGN / Sketching

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A small session on Sketching drawing heavily from the work of Bill Buxton, Kesley Ruger amongst others.

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E-CONCEPTS / E-DESIGN / Sketching

  1. 1. SKETCHINGBy James Norwood
  2. 2. SOME LINKS FOR YOUhttp://www.alistapart.com/http://www.uie.com/http://v1.yaronschoen.com/http://v4.jasonsantamaria.com/http://designinformer.com/http://52weeksofux.com/http://404uxd.com/http://www.adaptivepath.com/http://www.graphicdesignblog.co.uk/http://www.themoleskin.com/
  3. 3. YOU’LL ALSO WANT TO READ…Sketching User Experiences.Getting the design right and the right design.Bill Buxton ISBN: 978-0-12-374037-3…and some links :http://www.billbuxton.com/http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/MIX/MIX09/KEY01
  4. 4.  “The only true voyage of discovery is not to goto new place, but to have others eyes.”Marcel Proust 
  5. 5. TO DOODLE
  6. 6. •  To Doodle – “To Make spontaneous marks to help yourself think”•  29% greater retention of information – when exposed to verbal information.•  Pre-emptive process to stop you from loosing focus.Sunni Brown – Doodling. 
  7. 7. TO SKETCH
  8. 8. WHAT EXACTLY ISVISUAL THINKINGusing a visual approach to facilitate thethought or problem solving process. ?
  9. 9. VISUAL THINKING at its core is about discovery and exploring different POSSIBILITIESfor making things clear and easy for people to UNDERSTAND
  10. 10. COMMON LANGUAGE,METAPHORS & ANALOGIESto communicate, document and solveproblems and share common stories Visual Thinking Goal
  11. 11. This isn’t a new skill. When we were children THIS STUFF WASVERY SIMPLE FOR USWe just have to relearn some simple principles
  12. 12.  “If you want to get the most out of a sketch, youneed to leave big enough holes.”Bill Buxton 
  13. 13. YOUR MIND FILLS INTHE GAPS
  14. 14. WHY SKETCHES ROCK!According to Bill Buxton
  15. 15. QUICKA sketch is quick to make, or at least gives thatimpression.
  16. 16. TIMELYA sketch can be provided when needed.
  17. 17. INEXPENSIVEA sketch is cheap. Cost must not inhibit theability to explore a concept, especially early inthe design process.
  18. 18. DISPOSABLEIf you can’t afford to throw it away when done, itis probably not a sketch. The investment with asketch is in the concept, not the execution. Bythe way, this doesn’t mean that they have novalue, or that you always dispose of them.Rather, their value largely depends on theirdisposability.
  19. 19. CLEAR VOCABULARYThe style in which a sketch is rendered followscertain conventions that distinguish it from othertypes of renderings. The style, or form, signalsthat it is a sketch. The way that lines extendthrough endpoints is an example of such aconvention, or style.
  20. 20. DISTINCT GESTURESThere is a fluidity to sketches that give them asense of openness and freedom. They are nottight and precise, in the sense that anengineering drawing would be, for example.
  21. 21. MINIMAL DETAILInclude only what is required to render the intendedpurpose or concept. Lawson (1997, p242) puts itthis way, “… it is usually helpful if the drawing doesnot show or suggest answers to questions whichare not being asked at the time.” Superfluous detailis almost always distracting, at best, no matter howattractive or well rendered. Going beyond “goodenough” is a negative, not a positive.
  22. 22. APPROPRIATE DEGREE OFREFINEMENTBy its resolution or style, a sketch should notsuggest a level of refinement beyond that of theproject being depicted. As Lawson expresses it,“ ... it seems helpful if the drawing suggests onlya level of precision which corresponds to thelevel of certainty in the designer’s mind at thetime.”
  23. 23. AMBIGUITYSketches are intentionally ambiguous, and muchof their value derives from their being able to beinterpreted in different ways, and newrelationships seen within them, even by theperson who drew them.
  24. 24. SKETCHING WITHPHYSICAL OBJECTS
  25. 25. TECH BOX at IDEOIt consists of hundreds of gadgets. Most are laid out on openshelf-like drawers. Some are toys, and are just there becausethey are clever, fun, or embody some other characteristic thatmay inspire, amuse, or inform (or perhaps all three). Othersmight be samples of materials that could be useful or relevant tofuture designs. This might include flexible cloth-like fabric thatcan also be used as a touch pad, or rubber that does notbounce.
  26. 26. The CoWallSweden’s School of Arts and Communication’s
  27. 27. “…the fidelity of the sketch should reflect thedepth of our thinking. A rough idea deserves arough-looking sketch, while a well-thought-through idea warrants finely drawn, detailedimagery.”Bill Buxton 
  28. 28. SKETCH vs PROTYPE
  29. 29. “Sketches have a distinct vocabulary thatdifferentiates them from finished renderings. Theyare not rendered at a resolution higher than isrequired to capture their intended purpose orconcept. The resolution or style of the renderingshould not suggest a degree of refinement orcompletion that exceeds the actual state ofdevelopment, or thinking, of the concept.”Bill Buxton 
  30. 30. HUNKERING
  31. 31. TO SKETCH OR NOTTO SKETCH?
  32. 32. DESIGN IS ACOMPROMISE
  33. 33. DON’T BE PRECIOUS
  34. 34. WHY CLIENTSLOVESKETCHES
  35. 35. “There are no dumb questions. There are noideas too crazy to consider. Get it on the table,even if you are playing around. It may lead tosomething.”Bill Buxton 
  36. 36. SKETCHINGTECHNIQUES
  37. 37. LESSON #1MASTER BASIC SHAPES What do I want you to know? Most of the things we draw are made up of seven basic shapes. point rectangle line oval circle triangle square ...AND VARIATIONS OF THOSE SHAPES
  38. 38. LESSON #2MAKING FACES What do I want you to know? Drawing faces is all about learning to see with an empathetic eye and knowing that when you sketch you aren’t trying to be Picasso... oh wait a minute maybe you are.... eyes & eyebrows express A LOT heads don’t have to be perfectly round learn the basic patterns
  39. 39. LESSON #3DRAWING PEOPLE What do I want you to know? This one is tough for all of us because we aren’t observant and we start with the wrong part of the body. start with the torso think about your own limbs keep it simple ...ITS NOT ANATOMY CLASS...REALLY.
  40. 40. LESSON #4LETTERING What do I want you to know? You will need to draw letters and frames to divide sections in your sketches or to explain & label start with your natural handwriting trace if necessary go back to kindergarten
  41. 41. LESSON #5ARROWS,CONNECTORS What do I want you to know? Arrows and connectors are used to show the relationship between two objects or to connect objects in a flow diagram. Arrow can also be used to direct a viewers attention in a certain direction.
  42. 42. LESSON #6FRAMES & CALLOUTS What do I want you to know? Frames will help you section your sketches and create flows. They are also good for illustrating relationships in systems
  43. 43. LIFE DRAWING
  44. 44. LOGO SKETCHING
  45. 45. SITE SKETCHING

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