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THE DYNAMIC NATURE OFVULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATIONTO CLIMATE-RELATED RISKS ANDCHANGE: THE IQALUIT LAND USEMONITORING PROJEC...
Background2    ¨    Key theme in scholarship: CC and subsistence hunting    ¨    Baseline understanding          ¤    W...
The Iqaluit Land Use Monitoring Project                 (ILMP)3    ¨    Obtain real-time          longitudinal data on In...
GPS Tracking4    ¨  2 full-time hunters equipped with GPS    ¨  2007 – ongoing
Regular interviews5    ¨  >100 post hunt interviews    ¨  Examine GPS data, review land use, dangers        encountered,...
Accompanied hunting trips6    ¨    Team members go hunting during all seasons
Instrumental data7    ¨    Use of local weather station data and CIS ice charts
Results: Land-use8¨    2008-2010:      >21,000km travel      ¤  70% by snowmobile,         average trip107km      ¤  30...
Results: Changing env. conditions9    ¨    1982-2010          ¤  50 days later              freeze up          ¤  70 da...
Results: Access constraints &       opportunities10 ¨  Trail network     “choke points” ¨  2010/11 many     hunting area...
Results: Terrestrial adaptation11 ¨    Caribou in       Amadjuak Lake       region in Nov-Jan       ¤  Sustainability:  ...
Results: General observations (1)12     ¨    Co-occurence of climatic extremes problematic           ¤  e.g.            ...
Results: General observations (2)13     ¨    Potential for ‘trajectories of           maladaptation’ (Fazey et al 2011)  ...
Conclusion14     ¨  Analyzed 2008-2010 data (see Ford et al., in         review, Annals Assoc. of American Geographers)  ...
Thank You 15       Thank YouAcknowledgments: Josh Atagoyuk, Levi Pisuktie, Udlu Pisuktie, Tristan Pearce, Bill Gough, Rick...
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The Dynamic Nature of Vulnerability and Adaptation to Climate-Related Risks and Change: The Iqaluit Land Use Monitoring Project

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Presentation by Dr. James for given to the IPY 2012 conference in Montreal on April 24, 2012

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The Dynamic Nature of Vulnerability and Adaptation to Climate-Related Risks and Change: The Iqaluit Land Use Monitoring Project

  1. 1. THE DYNAMIC NATURE OFVULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATIONTO CLIMATE-RELATED RISKS ANDCHANGE: THE IQALUIT LAND USEMONITORING PROJECT Dr James D. Ford, Graham McDowell, Jamal Shirley www.jamesford.ca
  2. 2. Background2 ¨  Key theme in scholarship: CC and subsistence hunting ¨  Baseline understanding ¤  Widespread evidence of CC and impacts (safety, food security, culture) ¤  Vulnerability / resilience mediated by socio-economic factors ¨  Deficiencies in understanding (see Ford & Pearce 2012, The Canadian Geographer) ¤  Static understanding yet vulnerability dynamic (e.g. adaptive learning, feedback, thresholds) ¤  Nature of climate - impact links not fully understood ¨  Methodological limitations ¤  Retrospective study design (recall bias, seasonal influences) ¤  Absence of longitudinal studies, reliance of limited field seasons
  3. 3. The Iqaluit Land Use Monitoring Project (ILMP)3 ¨  Obtain real-time longitudinal data on Inuit- environment interactions to understand how climate risks are experienced and managed
  4. 4. GPS Tracking4 ¨  2 full-time hunters equipped with GPS ¨  2007 – ongoing
  5. 5. Regular interviews5 ¨  >100 post hunt interviews ¨  Examine GPS data, review land use, dangers encountered, coping mechanisms employed etc.
  6. 6. Accompanied hunting trips6 ¨  Team members go hunting during all seasons
  7. 7. Instrumental data7 ¨  Use of local weather station data and CIS ice charts
  8. 8. Results: Land-use8¨  2008-2010: >21,000km travel ¤  70% by snowmobile, average trip107km ¤  30% boat, average trip 99km Ford et al (in review, AAAG)
  9. 9. Results: Changing env. conditions9 ¨  1982-2010 ¤  50 days later freeze up ¤  70 days more open water ¤  Declining wind predominance ¨  Hunting team ¤  Iceinstability Ford et al (in review, ¤  2010/11 AAAG) extremes
  10. 10. Results: Access constraints & opportunities10 ¨  Trail network “choke points” ¨  2010/11 many hunting areas inaccessible Ford et al (in review, AAAG)
  11. 11. Results: Terrestrial adaptation11 ¨  Caribou in Amadjuak Lake region in Nov-Jan ¤  Sustainability: hunting pressure, CC, & caribou ¤  Land hazards ( snow, river freeze up (e.g. 2008)) Ford et al (in review, AAAG)
  12. 12. Results: General observations (1)12 ¨  Co-occurence of climatic extremes problematic ¤  e.g. Nov-Dec 2010: late freeze-up, 38 days lost to high winds, Amadjuak Lake trail impassible till Dec ¨  High adaptability: flexibility, TK ¨  Hunting team are keystone individuals ¤  Broad importance for Iqaluit ¨  Importance of income: damaged equipment replaced, extra distance costs incurred (e.g. vs Igloolik)
  13. 13. Results: General observations (2)13 ¨  Potential for ‘trajectories of maladaptation’ (Fazey et al 2011) ¤  Short-term adaptability may result in long term vulnerability ¤  Donwstream effects: displacing impacts to future ¤  Overspecialized adaptations susceptible to a new stressor (e.g. caribou)
  14. 14. Conclusion14 ¨  Analyzed 2008-2010 data (see Ford et al., in review, Annals Assoc. of American Geographers) ¨  Future ¤  Focus on 2010/11 ¤  Continued monitoring ¤  Aim: 10 years
  15. 15. Thank You 15 Thank YouAcknowledgments: Josh Atagoyuk, Levi Pisuktie, Udlu Pisuktie, Tristan Pearce, Bill Gough, Rick Siewierski, Sara Statham,Frank Duerden, Mike Pitre, ArcticNet, SSHRC, NRI, IPY

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