Mapping the Human Dimensions of Climate Change in the Canadian Arctic

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Mapping the Human Dimensions of Climate Change in the Canadian Arctic

  1. 1. Mapping  the  human  dimensions  of  climate  change  research  in  the  Canadian  Arctic  James  D.  Ford  KC  Bolton,  J  Shirley,  T  Pearce,     M  Tremblay,  M  Westlake        www.jamesford.ca      IPY  Conference,  Montreal,  April  23rd  2012    
  2. 2. Introduction    •  Explosion  of  human  dimensions  of  climate   change  (HDCC)  research     •  6,800  hits  for  CC  and  adaptation    •  Similar  trend  in  Canadian  Arctic  
  3. 3. The  Challenge  •  Need  to  keep  track  of  publishing  trends   •  Research  duplication     •  Gaps  neglected    •  Project  aim:  what  we  know  about  HDCC  in   eastern  Canadian  Arctic  (Nunavut,   Nunavik,  Nunatsiavut)  
  4. 4. Methodology    •  How  to  do  a  lit  review?    •  ‘Narrative’  literature  reviews   •  IPCC,  ACIA,  National  assessments   •  Comprehensive  BUT  transparency,  replicability  •  Systematic  lit  review  methodology   •  Address  specific  question     •  Systematic  and  explicit  methods   •  Aim  for  replicability  and  external  validation   •  (e.g.  Ford  and  Pearce  2010  in  Env  Res  Letters;  Ford  et   al  2011  in  Climatic  Change  )    
  5. 5. Methodology  •  Search  procedure     •  2070  initial  hits     •  117  articles  retained  for  full  review    •  Analysis     •  Quantitative  coding  scheme   •  Qualitative  analysis    
  6. 6. Rapid  growth  in  HDCC   research   INAC  &   FNIHB  CC   projects   IPY  begins     Harper   elected     Canada   ratifies  Kyoto  #  publications   ArcticNet  &   Nasivvik   established   Canadian   National   Assessment   ACIA   published   published   Year    
  7. 7. The  social  sciences  and   increasingly  prominent    •  Social  sciences   •  Vulnerability  /  impacts  assessment   •  Identification  of  adaptation  options     •  Resource  management    •  Biophysical  sciences     •  Animal  populations  (polar  bears,  caribou)  •  Health  sciences     •  Slow  to  emerge   •  Food  security  and  safety  focus  predominant    
  8. 8. TK  is  widely  utilized  in  HDCC   studies  •  Major  development  in  recent  work   •  Documenting  change   •  Knowledge  system  evolution     •  Characterize  vulnerability  &  resilience     •  Underpinning  adaptive  capacity  •  BUT   •  Need  for  critical  reflection  on  methodology  to   incorporate  TK  
  9. 9. Stakeholder  engagement   increasing  }  Author  analysis   }  2005  first  paper  authored  with  community   members  
  10. 10. Stakeholder  engagement   increasing  }  Author  analysis   }  2005  first  paper  authored  with  community   members   }  42%  authors  geography  /  env.  sciences       }  24%  ecology   }  8%  health  sciences   }  17%  earth  &  atmospheric  science     }  0%  law,  economics  
  11. 11. Significant  geographic   disparities  in  publishing    •  Regional  analysis   •  39%  NU   •  9%  Nunavik   •  4%  Nunatsiavut   •  21%  Arctic  generally    •  Research  hotspots   •  Small,  traditional  settlements  overrepresented  •  Large  number  of  communities  with  no   research  (see  online  google  map)  
  12. 12. Sectoral  disparities  pronounced  
  13. 13. Research  needs    •  Address  geographic  disparities     •  Need  for  broader  spread  of  studies  to  allow  for   generalization    •  Address  sectoral  bias   •  Business  &  economy  (mining  in  particular,   tourism,  fisheries)   •  Opportunities  from  CC   •  Health  
  14. 14. Research  needs    •  Future  focus   •  What  do  future  scenarios  mean  •  Adaptation  research   •  Effectiveness,  durability,  socio-­‐economic  and   ecological  implications,  long  term  viability  and   cost  •  Vulnerable  sub-­‐groups    
  15. 15. Conclusion  •  We  know  a  lot     •  2.7  articles  per  1000  people  •  Take  stock  every  5  years     •  Same  methodology  –  track  evolution  of   knowledge  •  To  read  more:   Ford  J  et  al  (in  press).  A  literature  review  and  gap   analysis  of  human  dimensions  of  climate  change   research  in  Nunavut,  Nunavik,  and  Nunatsiavut.   Arctic.      
  16. 16. Thank-­‐You      
  17. 17. Stakeholder  engagement   increasing  }  Author  analysis    

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