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Lord ‘ 
of the Flies’ 
TEST REVIEW 
William 
Golding
Title Translation 
“Beelzebub” a Hebrew word for 
LUCIFER 
However, the literal translation of “Beelzebub” 
into English i...
About William Golding 
• British novelist 
• Born on September 19, 1911, died 1993 
• Studied Science and English at Oxfor...
In the decade before LOTF was 
published, Britain had been involved 
in two wars: 
•WWII •Korean War
LORD OF THE FLIES 
Influences on the Book 
WWII Nazism & the The Third Reich
As a child, Golding had 
witnessed WWI, which 
was referred to as “the 
war to end all wars” 
However, 22 years later 
Bri...
Through LOTF, Golding is making the 
statement that we cannot escape our 
savage, violent tendencies…
…and without 
social order, 
we devolve 
into a state of chaos
Point of View… 
• Lord of the Flies is 
told in the 
omniscient point of 
view. 
• The narrator is “all-knowing” 
and tell...
Setting There are several key ideas in 
Lord of the Flies that are 
revealed by setting. 
Lord of the Flies
The Island 
• The island is a perfect 
microcosm. It is like an ant-farm. 
• A microcosm is a mini-society. 
• Limited res...
The Symbolism of the Island 
• Different areas of the island are 
associated with different ideas. 
• Beach = Dreams/hope ...
The Setting… 
• After being evacuated during an atomic war, the boys in 
the novel crash land on a tropical island. They a...
The Island Personified 
1. Personification is used throughout the 
text to make the natural world seem 
sinister. Find 3 e...
Allusions 
• Use of the names Ralph and Jack as the 
main characters from The Coral Island. 
• Simon from the Bible “Simon...
Character Analysis 
• Ralph ~ Main character 
described as “fair 
haired,” having “broad 
shoulders…[like a] 
boxer’s,” an...
Character Analysis 
• Piggy  Described as 
“fat,” “intellectual,” 
asthmatic, and needs 
glasses 
Represents scientific, 
...
Character Analysis 
• Jack ~ Described as 
having red hair, wears 
black with a snake 
clasp, ugly, cruel and 
manipulativ...
Character Analysis 
• Simon ~ Described as 
a skinny, vivid little 
boy, who“meditates;” 
and he faints, which 
some cultu...
Character Analysis 
• Roger ~ “Silent” 
and sadistic 
Targets the “littluns” 
The only one to 
premeditate murder 
Kills w...
Character Analysis 
• Sam and Eric (Samneric) ~ 
Twins 
Described as barely having 
enough skin to cover both, 
bullet-hea...
Character Analysis 
• “Littluns” ~ The younger kids 
Represent the common folk, 
who easily follow the lead of 
others int...
LORD OF THE 
FLIES 
INTRODUCTION 
THEMES & IMAGERY
LORD OF THE FLIES 
INTRODUCTION 
THEMES & IMAGERY 
Evil / Fear of the Unknown
Lord of the Flies 
• Fear of the Unknown 
1. The boys are afraid because they do not 
know where they are, why their plane...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
INTRODUCTION 
THEMES & IMAGERY 
ORDER
Lord of the Flies 
• The Need for Social Order 
1. The boys are separated from civilization 
2. They attempt to create the...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
THEMES & IMAGERY 
POWER/LEADERSHIP
Lord of the Flies 
• Power 
1. To Ralph, power is democratic 
2. The conch becomes a symbol of power 
3. To Jack, power is...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
THEMES & IMAGERY 
Savagery / Loss of Identity 
and Innocence
Notes on Lord of the Flies 
• Loss of Identity 
1. The boys begin to lose their individual 
identities: littluns, bigguns,...
Notes on Lord of the Flies 
• Loss of Innocence 
1. Ralph’s faith in democracy is shattered 
2. Following the rules offers...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
THEMES & IMAGERY 
NATURE/ISLAND
Lord of the Flies 
• Vision 
1. Mirages impair the boy’ vision 
2. Although Piggy’s vision is poor, he can 
see most clear...
THEMES 
• Human Evil – Evil is a part of human nature, and it lies within us. It is 
not a force of civilization. Society’...
LOTF Symbols 
(Objects, characters, figures, or colors that represent ideas or concepts) 
Piggy’s Glasses = The last 
surv...
TERMS to REMEMBER 
• Microcosm = A 
small world that 
represents the world 
at large 
• Edenic = Eden like, 
paradise like...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
INTRODUCTION 
Parallels To Be Made 
Lord of the Flies is an allegorical novel. It is an allegory on 
se...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
INTRODUCTION 
Parallels To Be Made
LORD OF THE FLIES 
INTRODUCTION 
Parallels To Be Made 
LOTF is an allegory of the political state of the world in the post...
Philosophical Influence 
• John Hobbes 
– English Philosopher: 1588- 1679 
– Man is by nature selfishly individualistic 
–...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 1 
William Golding sets his novel Lord of the 
Flies at a time when Europe is in the midst of 
...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 1 
As the story opens, two boys emerge from the 
wreckage of a plane which is eventually dragge...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 1 
The novel opens with a description of the "long scar 
smashed into the jungle," a reference ...
Chapter 2: “Fire on the Mountain” 
• Ralph sets rules 
– No one can talk, unless they’re holding the conch. 
• A Boy procl...
Chapter 3: “Huts on the Beach” 
• Jack tries to catch a pig, but misses. 
• Ralph and Simon start to build shelters. 
• Si...
Chapter 4: “Painted Faces and Long Hair” 
• Things between the boys start to change. 
• Jack, Samneric, and Bill, all put ...
Chapter 5: “Beast From Water” 
• Ralph is deep in thought about what he should do as chief and seems to 
be losing his aut...
Chapter 6: “Beast From Air” 
• Golding details the night-time arrival of a dead parachutist onto the 
mountain of the isla...
CHAPTER 8 
Gift for the Darkness
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 8 
Back on the beach, Piggy can’t 
believe the beast is real. He 
asks what they should do. 
Ra...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 8 
Jack says his hunters could kill the beast. 
Ralph says they’re just boys with sticks. 
Infu...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 8 
Jack accuses Ralph of belittling the hunters. He 
says Ralph is like Piggy and isn’t a prope...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 8 
Jack storms off, humiliated and crying. He vows to 
form a new group, and says anyone can jo...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 8 
The boys build the fire and 
the littleuns dance and sing. 
After the fire, Ralph realizes 
...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
NOTES - CHAPTER 8 
Simon has 
wandered alone 
into the forest. He 
enters a secret 
glade and sits ther...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 8 
Elsewhere in the jungle, Jack declares himself 
chief of the boys who have joined him. As ch...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 8 
The boys track, corner, and kill a big sow (a 
female pig). Jack cuts off its head. He decid...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 8 
Simon witnesses the killing and staking of the pig 
from his secret spot in the glade. Simon...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 8 
He stares at the pig’s head, at the Lord of the 
Flies,and seems to recognize it. 
"Fancy th...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
NOTES - CHAPTER 8 
Jack emerges 
from the forest 
into Ralph’s 
camp. As his 
followers steal 
fire fro...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
CHAPTER 8 
Simon is on the verge of 
having a fit in the forest. 
The pig’s head, the Lord of 
the Flie...
LORD OF THE FLIES 
NOTES - CHAPTER 8 
The beast links itself to 
“fun” (savagery) and 
confirms it exists within 
men. The...
NOTES - CHAPTER 8 
The Lord of the Flies (the title of Beelzebub, a demon from Hell) 
speaks to Simon inside of his mind a...
CHAPTER 8 
• Just like we saw back in Chapter 7, Simon continues to not 
be concerned with his own safety. It’s as if Simo...
Chapter 9 
• Simon wakes up from his encounter with the lord of the flies, 
– then climbs to the summit of the mountain. 
...
Chapter 10 
• At this point, only a few of the kids remain in Ralph’s 
group. 
• Jack sort of has created a “Tribe” of hun...
Chapter 11 
• Ralph lets the signal fire go out 
• Ralph is convinced by Piggy to blow the conch, 
which does nothing 
• P...
Chapter 12 
• Ralph settles into a wooded area on the island 
– he eats fruit 
– He messes around with the pig head where ...
The End 
“Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the 
darkness of man's heart, and the fall through the 
air of the true, wi...
Conclusion 
• Reflection of how our society really works 
• Proves how a situation can reveal a 
person’s dark side 
Phili...
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Lotf test review

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Lotf test review

  1. 1. Lord ‘ of the Flies’ TEST REVIEW William Golding
  2. 2. Title Translation “Beelzebub” a Hebrew word for LUCIFER However, the literal translation of “Beelzebub” into English is LORD OF THE FLIES
  3. 3. About William Golding • British novelist • Born on September 19, 1911, died 1993 • Studied Science and English at Oxford • Fought in Royal Navy during WWII • Participated in invasion of Normandy on D-Day • At war’s end, returned to teaching and writing • Earned the Nobel Prize in Literature
  4. 4. In the decade before LOTF was published, Britain had been involved in two wars: •WWII •Korean War
  5. 5. LORD OF THE FLIES Influences on the Book WWII Nazism & the The Third Reich
  6. 6. As a child, Golding had witnessed WWI, which was referred to as “the war to end all wars” However, 22 years later Britain was again involved in ANOTHER WAR to end all wars, which caused more devastation than was imaginable
  7. 7. Through LOTF, Golding is making the statement that we cannot escape our savage, violent tendencies…
  8. 8. …and without social order, we devolve into a state of chaos
  9. 9. Point of View… • Lord of the Flies is told in the omniscient point of view. • The narrator is “all-knowing” and tells of the events as they unfold.
  10. 10. Setting There are several key ideas in Lord of the Flies that are revealed by setting. Lord of the Flies
  11. 11. The Island • The island is a perfect microcosm. It is like an ant-farm. • A microcosm is a mini-society. • Limited resources. • Population of leaders/followers. Lord of the Flies
  12. 12. The Symbolism of the Island • Different areas of the island are associated with different ideas. • Beach = Dreams/hope of rescue • Mountain = Mystery, truth, spiritual place • Bush = Ritual, concealment, The boys’ reaction to the bush is symbolic of how the boys will ultimately respond to the desperate situation that they are in. • Rocky-outcrop = savagery, death Lord of the Flies
  13. 13. The Setting… • After being evacuated during an atomic war, the boys in the novel crash land on a tropical island. They are thought to be somewhere in the Pacific or Indian Ocean. • The events of the novel take place on this island, as the boys are stuck there in hopes of being rescued.
  14. 14. The Island Personified 1. Personification is used throughout the text to make the natural world seem sinister. Find 3 examples of personification used to describe a feature of the island. 2. Why might Golding have used personification to this effect? What is his purpose? Lord of the Flies
  15. 15. Allusions • Use of the names Ralph and Jack as the main characters from The Coral Island. • Simon from the Bible “Simon called Peter”, Peter was the other boy’s name in The Coral Island • Mention of Coral Island and Treasure Island • Numerous biblical allusions throughout
  16. 16. Character Analysis • Ralph ~ Main character described as “fair haired,” having “broad shoulders…[like a] boxer’s,” and has a face that “proclaims no devil” Committed to civilization and morality Translation = GOOD
  17. 17. Character Analysis • Piggy Described as “fat,” “intellectual,” asthmatic, and needs glasses Represents scientific, rational side of civilization, and social order
  18. 18. Character Analysis • Jack ~ Described as having red hair, wears black with a snake clasp, ugly, cruel and manipulative Represents our savage instincts played out EVIL
  19. 19. Character Analysis • Simon ~ Described as a skinny, vivid little boy, who“meditates;” and he faints, which some cultures have believed is a sign of connecting with the spiritual world Seems to be connected with nature, and he has an innate, spiritual goodness
  20. 20. Character Analysis • Roger ~ “Silent” and sadistic Targets the “littluns” The only one to premeditate murder Kills without conscience Pure evil
  21. 21. Character Analysis • Sam and Eric (Samneric) ~ Twins Described as barely having enough skin to cover both, bullet-headed, and they finish each other’s sentences The last to remain loyal to Ralph Represent the tug-of-war within us to remain good
  22. 22. Character Analysis • “Littluns” ~ The younger kids Represent the common folk, who easily follow the lead of others into savagery when there is no enforced structure in society
  23. 23. LORD OF THE FLIES INTRODUCTION THEMES & IMAGERY
  24. 24. LORD OF THE FLIES INTRODUCTION THEMES & IMAGERY Evil / Fear of the Unknown
  25. 25. Lord of the Flies • Fear of the Unknown 1. The boys are afraid because they do not know where they are, why their plane crashed, or what will happen if they are not rescued. 2. The littluns fear the beastie or snake-like thing that comes in the dark 3. The bigguns fears beasts that are still unknown 4. “The Beast” – Snake-like thing – the dead parachutist – The Lord of the Flies – Simon - The boys themselves
  26. 26. LORD OF THE FLIES INTRODUCTION THEMES & IMAGERY ORDER
  27. 27. Lord of the Flies • The Need for Social Order 1. The boys are separated from civilization 2. They attempt to create their own form of order and government 3. Without someone to enforce the rules, the boys fail to observe their own rules 4. The boys eventually abandon the rules of civilization 5. Without social order, the boys commit acts of savagery and murder
  28. 28. LORD OF THE FLIES THEMES & IMAGERY POWER/LEADERSHIP
  29. 29. Lord of the Flies • Power 1. To Ralph, power is democratic 2. The conch becomes a symbol of power 3. To Jack, power is authoritarian 4. Jack treats the members of his choir cruelly 5. The littluns begin to exercise power of small creatures 6. Roger enjoys unrestrained power
  30. 30. LORD OF THE FLIES THEMES & IMAGERY Savagery / Loss of Identity and Innocence
  31. 31. Notes on Lord of the Flies • Loss of Identity 1. The boys begin to lose their individual identities: littluns, bigguns, samneric 2. The choir becomes hunters 3. The mask allows the boys to become someone else 4. Jack’s followers become a savage tribe 5. Ralph has difficulty remember he is the leader and why rescue is important 6. Percival forgets his own name
  32. 32. Notes on Lord of the Flies • Loss of Innocence 1. Ralph’s faith in democracy is shattered 2. Following the rules offers no protection 3. Piggy’s belief in fairness is proven false 4. Violence takes the lives of three boys 5. The boys come to accept the notion that the world is not completely good
  33. 33. LORD OF THE FLIES THEMES & IMAGERY NATURE/ISLAND
  34. 34. Lord of the Flies • Vision 1. Mirages impair the boy’ vision 2. Although Piggy’s vision is poor, he can see most clearly what they need to do to survive 3. Piggy is blind to the reality that evil exists in the boys themselves 4. Simon has the clearest vision of the true nature of evil on the island 5. Only Simon sees the “Lord of the Flies” 6. Only Simon goes to the mountaintop to see the beast clearly in the daylight.
  35. 35. THEMES • Human Evil – Evil is a part of human nature, and it lies within us. It is not a force of civilization. Society’s welfare depends on man’s idea of right and wrong, not on outside forces. • Savagery – Golding believes that humans, when forced to live in nature, revert to savagery. • Loss of Innocence – The boys, young and innocent at the time they arrive on the island, are forced to deal with situations that are normally associated with adult life. As a result, many of the boys lose the innocence that comes as a part of childhood.
  36. 36. LOTF Symbols (Objects, characters, figures, or colors that represent ideas or concepts) Piggy’s Glasses = The last surviving evidence of the lawful, structured world Conch Shell = New democracy on the island Snake = Evil…reference to the serpent in the garden of Eden
  37. 37. TERMS to REMEMBER • Microcosm = A small world that represents the world at large • Edenic = Eden like, paradise like, a setting that has not yet been spoiled by man
  38. 38. LORD OF THE FLIES INTRODUCTION Parallels To Be Made Lord of the Flies is an allegorical novel. It is an allegory on several levels: political, religious and psychological. On its most basic level it is an allegory of human society today. Writers use allegory to illustrate abstract meanings by using concrete images. Often, characters in allegories personify some abstract quality. While it is possible to read Lord of the Flies as allegory, the work is so complex that it can be read on many levels.
  39. 39. LORD OF THE FLIES INTRODUCTION Parallels To Be Made
  40. 40. LORD OF THE FLIES INTRODUCTION Parallels To Be Made LOTF is an allegory of the political state of the world in the post war period; as a Freudian psychological understanding of human kind; or as the Christian understanding of the fall of humankind, among others. The novel serves as a warning to the leaders of the world , implying that man’s destructive nature will ultimately be his undoing . Just like Adam and Eve from the Old Testament’s Book of Genesis, the “Lost Boys” will be cast from the Garden of Eden due to their sinful nature.
  41. 41. Philosophical Influence • John Hobbes – English Philosopher: 1588- 1679 – Man is by nature selfishly individualistic – Man constantly at war with other men – Fear of violent death is sole motivation to create civilizations – Men need to be controlled by absolute sovereignty to avoid brutish behavior
  42. 42. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 1 William Golding sets his novel Lord of the Flies at a time when Europe is in the midst of nuclear destruction. A group of boys, being evacuated from England to Australia, crash land on a tropical island. No adults survive the crash, and the novel is the story of the boys' descent into chaos, disorder, and evil.
  43. 43. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 1 As the story opens, two boys emerge from the wreckage of a plane which is eventually dragged out to sea. The boys, Ralph and Piggy, begin exploring the island in hopes of finding other survivors. Because of the nuclear bomb's devastation, it's likely that no one knows the boys' whereabouts. Ralph is delighted to be on a pristine tropical island without adults, but Piggy is less pleased because he believes that without adults present the other boys will make fun of him.
  44. 44. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 1 The novel opens with a description of the "long scar smashed into the jungle," a reference to the snake-like damage done by the plane as it crashed into the island. Here civilization with its technology has dealt a blow to nature; nature counters by sweeping the wreckage out to sea. Yet the conflict is not so simple. While the jungle may represent nature, the beach provides the conch and the platform, both of which symbolize institutionalized order and politics (civilization).
  45. 45. Chapter 2: “Fire on the Mountain” • Ralph sets rules – No one can talk, unless they’re holding the conch. • A Boy proclaims that there is a “Beastie” or “Snake-Thing” – Ralph says there’s no such thing. – Jack says him and his hunters will kill it if there is. • The boys talk about getting rescued. • Decide to make a fire and make sure it never dies. – On the top of the mountain that Jack, Ralph, and Simon all found. • The Fire gets too big, and starts to burn down the island. • The boy who proclaimed about the “Beastie” is not in the story…They believe he got killed in the Fire. Ashley Foster
  46. 46. Chapter 3: “Huts on the Beach” • Jack tries to catch a pig, but misses. • Ralph and Simon start to build shelters. • Simon is still convinced that the “Beastie or Snake-Thing” is real. • Simon is shown for the first time to have a certain power and wisdom of his own. Ashley Foster
  47. 47. Chapter 4: “Painted Faces and Long Hair” • Things between the boys start to change. • Jack, Samneric, and Bill, all put clay on their faces, and go on a pig hunt. • Ralph sees a ship while swimming with Piggy, The fire is out. • Jack smacks Piggy across the face, breaks one of Piggy’s Lenses. • Jack won’t give Piggy any meat so Simon gives his to Piggy. Jack tosses another piece to Simon. • Ralph calls an assembly.
  48. 48. Chapter 5: “Beast From Water” • Ralph is deep in thought about what he should do as chief and seems to be losing his authority over many of the boys, especially Jack and the hunters. Ralph too is growing more and more susceptible to the beast’s power of persuasion and is forgetting about the signal fire. • Another meeting is called to discuss matters but the main concern for most of the boys is their fear of the beast. • One of the littluns believes that the beast comes from the sea. This fear is further strengthened when Simon, the first of the biguns to do so, admits the possibility of there actually being a beast on the island. • Soon killing the pigs is associated with killing Piggy because with each successful hunt, Piggy loses more and more power as an advocate for order. This is evident from the partial breaking of his glasses. Giving into the beast by hunting is parallel to betraying Piggy, who rejects hunting as a worthwhile endeavor. Piggy confides to Ralph his fear of Jack. • Ralph realizes that indeed he is hated by Jack. It’s at this time that Ralph clearly sees the distinction between Jack and himself.
  49. 49. Chapter 6: “Beast From Air” • Golding details the night-time arrival of a dead parachutist onto the mountain of the island. It’s often speculated that this is the plane’s pilot, yet Golding never confirms this one way or the other. • "Samneric, who are tending the fire, see this figure and run down to the shelters to tell the frightening news to Ralph. When morning comes. Jack and Ralph decide to seek out the beast at Castle Rock, and if they don’t find him there, they will search the mountain. • Ralph leads the way, and Jack follows, yet when they reach the top no beast is in sight. This frustrates all the boys, but especially Ralph, who vents his frustrations. • The hunters want to stay at Castle Rock to build a fort and roll more rocks, but Ralph convinces them to follow him to the mountain.
  50. 50. CHAPTER 8 Gift for the Darkness
  51. 51. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 8 Back on the beach, Piggy can’t believe the beast is real. He asks what they should do. Ralph isn’t sure. He says the beast is sitting up by the signal fire as if trying to intercept their rescue. The intellectual Piggy can’t fathom the beast’s existence. Ralph considers the beast an enemy of civilization and rescue.
  52. 52. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 8 Jack says his hunters could kill the beast. Ralph says they’re just boys with sticks. Infuriated, Jack blows the conch to call a meeting. Ralph begins to talk but Jack says he called the meeting with the conch, so he should get to speak. Ralph lets him. Jack says they’ve seen the beast: it’s a hunter. By blowing the conch to call a meeting, Jack shows he’s still playing by civilization’s rules. Jack links himself & his boys to the beast by calling it a hunter.
  53. 53. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 8 Jack accuses Ralph of belittling the hunters. He says Ralph is like Piggy and isn’t a proper chief. Jack calls for a vote to remove Ralph and make Jack chief. Nobody votes for Jack. The boys’ allegiance still remains with civilization and order. They’re unwilling to surrender to savagery…so far.
  54. 54. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 8 Jack storms off, humiliated and crying. He vows to form a new group, and says anyone can join him when he hunts. He disappears into the forest. Everyone is stunned, but the meeting continues. Simon suggests they climb the mountain. Piggy considers the suggestion insane. He says they should just build a signal fire on the beach. Jack (savagery) forms his own tribe outside civilization. Simon (spirituality) suggests they confront the beast. Piggy (civilization) strives to find a way to ignore and hide from the beast.
  55. 55. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 8 The boys build the fire and the littleuns dance and sing. After the fire, Ralph realizes that all the biguns but Samneric and Piggy have disappeared. Most have gone to join Jack. A turning point: publicly the biguns are unwilling to oppose civilization, but privately they choose Jack, the beast, and savagery.
  56. 56. LORD OF THE FLIES NOTES - CHAPTER 8 Simon has wandered alone into the forest. He enters a secret glade and sits there in the sun. Though he gets thirstier and thirstier, he continues to sit. Like other religious mystics, Simon fasts and meditates.
  57. 57. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 8 Elsewhere in the jungle, Jack declares himself chief of the boys who have joined him. As chief, he says he’s going to get more “biguns away from the conch” and when his tribe hunts they’ll leave some of the kill for the beast. That way, it won’t bother them. Jack leads the boys into the forest. Jack now treats the beast like a god. The other boys’ fear of the beast increases their loyalty to Jack. Savage chiefs both fear the beast and use it to gain power
  58. 58. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 8 The boys track, corner, and kill a big sow (a female pig). Jack cuts off its head. He decides they’ll raid Ralph’s camp for fire to cook the pig, and invite everyone to a feast. Roger, meanwhile, sharpens a stick at both ends. They stake the pig head on the stick and leave it as an offering to the beast. Jack and his tribe decide to attack Ralph’s civilization. Their offering makes clear that to them the beast is now a god who demands sacrifice.
  59. 59. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 8 Simon witnesses the killing and staking of the pig from his secret spot in the glade. Simon is thirsty and exhausted, and the pig’s head seems to talk to him. It tells him to leave and go back to the others.
  60. 60. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 8 He stares at the pig’s head, at the Lord of the Flies,and seems to recognize it. "Fancy thinking the Beast was something you could hunt and kill! You knew, didn't you? I’m part of you” Simon recognizes that the offering to the beast actually is the beast. In trying to appease the beast by sacrificing to it, Jack’s tribe is actually making the beast more powerful.
  61. 61. LORD OF THE FLIES NOTES - CHAPTER 8 Jack emerges from the forest into Ralph’s camp. As his followers steal fire from the signal fire, he invites Ralph’s group to come his feast, then disappears. The purpose of fire has changed from rescue to cooking for survival.
  62. 62. LORD OF THE FLIES CHAPTER 8 Simon is on the verge of having a fit in the forest. The pig’s head, the Lord of the Flies, speaks to him. “We are going to have fun on this island!” The beast warns Simon that if he tries to interfere that Jack, Roger, Maurice, Robert, Bill, Piggy, and Ralph will “kill” him.
  63. 63. LORD OF THE FLIES NOTES - CHAPTER 8 The beast links itself to “fun” (savagery) and confirms it exists within men. The beast’s threat is surprising: it says Piggy and Ralph will act with Jack and his tribe to kill Simon. The beast claims both civilization and savagery as allies against Simon’s spiritual truth.
  64. 64. NOTES - CHAPTER 8 The Lord of the Flies (the title of Beelzebub, a demon from Hell) speaks to Simon inside of his mind and warns him that he is a threat and "is not wanted on this island." The threat stems perhaps from his goodness and inability to be transformed into a hunter as the other choirboys had been. For his resistance, Simon must die, The Lord of the Flies tells him. Presumably, this is the voice of the beast within him that speaks; it is that very same "sickly part" of the human he had envisioned earlier. Being the most religiously good of the boys, he is understandably an obstacle in order for the primal, wicked aspects of the boys to come into full control.
  65. 65. CHAPTER 8 • Just like we saw back in Chapter 7, Simon continues to not be concerned with his own safety. It’s as if Simon knows that he will die soon. Regardless of the outcome, Simon is willing to make the ultimate sacrifice in order to learn the truth and reveal it to the others. Similar to Jesus Christ in the Garden of Gethsemane, Simon struggles with temptation, trying not to let the beast (Beelzebub) get the best of him. He will be strong in the face of evil and pay any price to save the others, even though the beast tells him that they are all against him.
  66. 66. Chapter 9 • Simon wakes up from his encounter with the lord of the flies, – then climbs to the summit of the mountain. – He looks at the dead pilot, then sees no beast in it – then he goes to the others to tell them there is no beast on the mountain. • In the same timeframe, Ralph and Piggy go to Jack’s pig roast, and eat. – Ralph tries to call another meeting, and is humiliated. – Piggy and Ralph also join in Jack’s chant, but denies that account. – Ralph reprimands jack for not having shelters when it rains at this roast. The pilot's body breaks free from the mountain & goes down into the sea. • When Simon goes into the chant, he is mistaken for the beast, then killed. His body also goes out into the sea. Philip
  67. 67. Chapter 10 • At this point, only a few of the kids remain in Ralph’s group. • Jack sort of has created a “Tribe” of hunters – The kids call him the “proper chief” – He has strict control over everyone in that tribe – No one orders Jack around – Jack explains the beast came as Simon disguised and they have to keep alert at all times. – Jack plans on steeling Piggy’s glasses with Roger, and Maurice • Jack and his helpers attack Ralph’s men, and steal Piggy’s glasses. Philip
  68. 68. Chapter 11 • Ralph lets the signal fire go out • Ralph is convinced by Piggy to blow the conch, which does nothing • Piggy shows bravery as he wants his glasses, and is willing to go to Jack to get them back – All 4 of Ralph’s gang go to Castle Rock to get Piggy’s glasses back – Samneric is captured (the twins are as 1 identity) – Piggy is killed Philip
  69. 69. Chapter 12 • Ralph settles into a wooded area on the island – he eats fruit – He messes around with the pig head where Simon encountered the beast – Ralph is viewed by Jack’s tribe as a pig now • Ralph becomes savage when the others find his hiding place revealed by Simneric • Jack and his clan starts the big fire on all the island – A ship office arrives at a burning island to find out what was wrong – The fire saved the kids, and the ships take them home Philip
  70. 70. The End “Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart, and the fall through the air of the true, wise friend called Piggy." - William Golding, Lord of the Flies, Chapter 12
  71. 71. Conclusion • Reflection of how our society really works • Proves how a situation can reveal a person’s dark side Philip and Julia

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