Lesson 4 5

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Critical Thinking at the Hogeschool van Amsterdam, Lesson 4 & 5

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  • Lesson 4 5

    1. 1. Critical thinkingJames PowellIM / TMAHvA University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdamj.r.powell@hva.nl
    2. 2. Prove it!Identifying valuable andinvaluable sources ofinformation and researchThink for a moment...Where do you getyour information?
    3. 3. Friends Teachers ColleaguesNewspapers Google Where does myParents knowledge Blogs from? Books Television Wikipedia Libraries
    4. 4. Good? Bad?Newspapers Colleagues Television Wikipedia Where does my Teachers Blogs knowledge Parents from? Friends Libraries Google Books
    5. 5. There’s no such thing asa bad source of information...
    6. 6. The problems arise when1.The source doesn’t support the purpose2. The sources are de-contextualised.We’ll look at source and purpose next weekwhen we take a look at your own projects.For now let’s discuss...
    7. 7. 2. Source and context“The Google Generation”
    8. 8. TIMEHOW DO I ESTABLISH PLACECONTEXT?T H R O U G H A CON MOTIVATIONSIDER ATION OF THEP A R A M E T E RS HISTORY ? OTHER VOICES
    9. 9. a shopkeeper my mum a buddhist a child a website a parameter a news reportThe Truth a motive a welshman a historical factora current factor her friend Obama
    10. 10. The Truth Have I missed anything?
    11. 11. 1. Source and purpose
    12. 12. What is your purpose? Get together with your group and sit together with another group.Give them your research question and a copy of your sources.Use the handout matrix to evaluate the extent to which the sources support the purpose of the research.
    13. 13. What is your purpose?Research and sources: questions toask yourselves:1.How reliable is this source?2.Are the examples used trulyrepresentative?3.Are the examples recent enough?4.Do the findings contradict otherevidence?5.What is the author’s motive?6.Is the author / commentator anauthority on this subject?7.Is the publication recognised as anauthority? If not, is that important inrelation to your research?
    14. 14. Referencing and footnotesIt is expected that you will referencesources consistently, and we areusing the Harvard system on thiscourse. Which isIn the body: (Mouse, M., 2010, p21)Under ‘Bibliography’ at the end:Mouse, M., (2010) How to be amouse, in ‘It’s a Mouse’s Life’, WaltDisney Press, CaliforniaSame structure for websites plus:http://www.example.com (accessed
    15. 15. Referencing and footnotesIn the event that you find that there iseither some explanation needed, oryou want to invite the reader to look atsomething that is relevant to, butbeyond the scope of the research,use footnotes[1][1] Note: Don’t use footnotes for references, or vice versa. Itgets confusing, it undermines the validity of your research,and annoys people who are trying to use your research forfurther projects!.
    16. 16. Next week Introductions & conclusions A chance to ask any final questions and check any last minute requirements for the mid-term presentationQuestion for the week: Is this photo inappropriate?

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