The Power Of Persuasion

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This is a training session/knowledge mashup that I put together after watching a stanford breakfast series video on persuasion. Also my first attempt of a slidecast.

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  • Welcome to this training session on the power of persuasion. This is based on a lecture that Robert Caldini did at Stanford university; his area of expertise is psychology and in particular, the psychology of persuasion.
  • The Power Of Persuasion

    1. The Power of Persuasion
    2. <ul><li>Changing people’s behavior </li></ul>
    3. 6 principles of persuasion
    4. 1) Reciprocity We feel obligated to return favours to people who have done favours for us in the past.
    5. Practical Tip #1 Do people favours.
    6. Don’t Forget
    7. The magic part…
    8. No problem! I’m glad to help you. I’m sure that if the situation were reversed, you would do the same for me.
    9. Reciprocity also applies to concessions
    10. <ul><li>If I give something up, you should give something up too. </li></ul>
    11. <ul><ul><li>When asking for something, start with the big ask </li></ul></ul>Practical Tip #2 <ul><ul><li>then move to the small ask </li></ul></ul>
    12. Practical Tip #3 Frame decisions in terms of losses, not gains
    13. If you don’t do this, you could be at risk to lose…
    14. 6 principles of persuasion 1) Reciprocity We feel obligated to return favours to people who have done favours for us in the past.
    15. 2) Scarcity
    16. We value information and commodities that are scarce more then when they are abundant.
    17. Exclusive information is like bread- serve it fresh to best enjoy
    18. 6 principles of persuasion 1) Reciprocity We feel obligated to return favours to people who have done favours for us in the past. 2) Scarcity We value scarce information and commodities more then things that are in abundance.
    19. 3) Authority <ul><li>We believe what trustworthy and credible experts say </li></ul>
    20. <ul><ul><li>To be seen as an expert, you need credentials and trust worthiness </li></ul></ul>
    21. Practical Tip #4 Before you give your strongest argument or proposal, begin by pointing out the weaknesses or drawbacks
    22. 6 principles of persuasion 1) Reciprocity We feel obligated to return favours to people who have done favours for us in the past. 2) Scarcity We value scarce information and commodities more then things that are in abundance. 3) Authority We believe what trustworthy and credible experts say.
    23. 4) Commitment People are most likely to do what is consistent with what they have done in the past
    24. Example: People are more likely to give you money if you first get them to give you the time. Do you know what time it is? Spare a quarter?
    25. Written commitments are the most powerful
    26. Practical Tip #5 Once someone has said yes to something, they will again- always try to deepen your existing relationships.
    27. 6 principles of persuasion 1) Reciprocity We feel obligated to return favours to people who have done favours for us in the past. 2) Scarcity We value scarce information and commodities more then things that are in abundance. 3) Authority We believe what trustworthy and credible experts say. 4) Commitment We are most likely to do what is consistent with what we have done in the past
    28. 5) Consensus People trust the power of the crowd
    29. People like to be associated with popular things.
    30. Practical Tip #6 Make sure you (or your product) is seen as in high demand.
    31. 6 principles of persuasion 1) Reciprocity We feel obligated to return favours to people who have done favours for us in the past. 2) Scarcity We value scarce information and commodities more then things that are in abundance. 3) Authority We believe what trustworthy and credible experts say. 4) Commitment We are most likely to do what is consistent with what we have done in the past 5) Consensus We trust the power of the crowd and like to be associated with popular things.
    32. 6) Likability People are more likely to say yes to people they like
    33. 3 elements of likability
    34. Similarities We like people that are similar or have similar interest as us.
    35. Compliments People like genuine compliments.
    36. Cooperative Efforts People like people who are willing to help out.
    37. Be Careful!!!! If you aren’t genuine, it won’t work.
    38. Practical Tip #6 Try to make people like you. But don’t try too hard, that won’t work.
    39. Sounds easy? <ul><li>Application is the hard part. </li></ul>
    40. 6 principles of persuasion 1) Reciprocity We feel obligated to return favours to people who have done favours for us in the past. 2) Scarcity We value scarce information and commodities more then things that are in abundance. 3) Authority We believe what trustworthy and credible experts say. 4) Commitment We are most likely to do what is consistent with what we have done in the past 5) Consensus We trust the power of the crowd and like to be associated with popular things. 6) Likability We say yes to people that we like. Similarity, compliments and cooperative effort.
    41. Practical Tips <ul><li>Do people favours. </li></ul><ul><li>When asking for something, start with the big ask then move to the small ask </li></ul><ul><li>Frame decisions in terms of losses, not gains </li></ul><ul><li>Before you give your strongest argument or proposal, begin by pointing out the weaknesses or drawbacks </li></ul><ul><li>Once someone has said yes to something, they will again- always try to deepen your existing relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure you (or your product) is seen as in high demand. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to make people like you </li></ul>
    42. Thank you!!

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