MRSA in Schools <ul><li>Dept. of Infectious Diseases </li></ul><ul><li>Kaiser Modesto Medical Center </li></ul><ul><li>Dec...
Learning Objectives <ul><li>What is Staphylococcus aureus? </li></ul><ul><li>What is MRSA? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the ...
What is Staphylococcus aureus? <ul><li>Staphylococcus aureus, often referred to as “staph,” are bacteria commonly carried ...
What is MRSA? ( Methicillin-resistant  Staphylococcus aureus ) <ul><li>MRSA is a kind of  Staphylococcus aureus  (“staph”)...
Is MRSA different from other “staph”? <ul><li>MRSA is a kind of “staph”. It can be carried on the skin or in the nose of h...
Does MRSA cause more serious infections than other “staph”?  <ul><li>MRSA usually does not cause more serious problems tha...
What do MRSA skin infections look like? <ul><li>Spider or bug bite (looks & feels like) </li></ul><ul><li>Infected skin/wo...
Who Gets MRSA? Anyone can get MRSA!
Risk factors associated with MRSA infection <ul><li>The 5 C’s of MRSA :  </li></ul><ul><li>C ontact;  </li></ul><ul><li>C ...
What increases the risk of MRSA infection? <ul><li>Close skin contact w/someone who has MRSA </li></ul><ul><li>Skin diseas...
How is MRSA spread? <ul><li>Skin to Skin Contact </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Touching MRSA infected skin </li></ul></ul><ul><ul>...
Is MRSA the “flesh-eating” bacteria?  <ul><li>Many bacteria can cause severe illness, including a very severe skin and sof...
How are MRSA skin infections treated? <ul><li>By a healthcare provider who may:  </li></ul><ul><li>Drain the infection and...
Should schools close because of an MRSA infection? <ul><li>The decision to close a school for any communicable disease sho...
Should the school be closed to be cleaned or disinfected when an MRSA infection occurs? <ul><li>Covering infections will g...
Should the entire school community be notified of every MRSA infection? <ul><li>Usually, it should not be necessary to inf...
Should the school be notified that my child has an MRSA infection? <ul><li>Consult with your school about its policy for n...
Should students with MRSA skin infections be excluded from attending school? <ul><li>Unless directed by a physician, stude...
Practical Advice for Teachers <ul><li>If you observe children with open draining wounds or infections, refer the child to ...
Advice for School Health Personnel <ul><li>Students with skin infections may need to be referred to a licensed health care...
How do we reduce the spread of MRSA? <ul><li>Protect others from infected wounds </li></ul><ul><li>Report all potential sk...
How do we reduce the spread of MRSA? <ul><li>Hand washing  is the most important way!  </li></ul><ul><li>Wash your hands w...
How do we reduce the spread of MRSA? <ul><li>-  Do not share personal items:   </li></ul><ul><li>Bar soap, clothes, towels...
How do we reduce the spread of MRSA? <ul><li>- Use barriers:   </li></ul><ul><li>Gloves for cleaning </li></ul><ul><li>Tow...
How do we reduce the spread of MRSA? <ul><li>-  Clean and disinfect surfaces:  </li></ul><ul><li>Clean first ––remove soil...
Teachers & administrative staff –Team up with custodians <ul><li>- Clean & disinfect: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Keyboards </li...
Physical education teachers –Team up <ul><li>-  Clean & disinfect : </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment (sports gear) that directl...
Help families team up <ul><li>-  Encourage: </li></ul><ul><li>Frequent hand washing & use of 60%  </li></ul><ul><li>alcoho...
 
Protecting students from infections helps protect you …and your family
Things to Remember <ul><li>Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly </li></ul><ul><li>Do not share personal items </li></...
Resources <ul><li>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/ar_mrsa_ca.htm...
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Mrsa In Schools Final Version

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Mrsa In Schools Final Version

  1. 1. MRSA in Schools <ul><li>Dept. of Infectious Diseases </li></ul><ul><li>Kaiser Modesto Medical Center </li></ul><ul><li>Dec. 12, 2007 </li></ul>
  2. 2. Learning Objectives <ul><li>What is Staphylococcus aureus? </li></ul><ul><li>What is MRSA? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the risk factors for MRSA? </li></ul><ul><li>What increases the risk of MRSA infection? </li></ul><ul><li>How is MRSA spread? </li></ul><ul><li>How can we reduce the spread of MRSA in schools? </li></ul>
  3. 3. What is Staphylococcus aureus? <ul><li>Staphylococcus aureus, often referred to as “staph,” are bacteria commonly carried on the skin or in the nose of healthy people. </li></ul><ul><li>About 25-30% of the U.S. population carries “staph” on their bodies and yet the bacteria do not always cause illness or infection. </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is MRSA? ( Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ) <ul><li>MRSA is a kind of Staphylococcus aureus (“staph”) bacteria </li></ul><ul><li>Often causes skin infections </li></ul><ul><li>“ Super Bug” - resistant to (not killed by) penicillins and many other antibiotics </li></ul><ul><li>Treatable with appropriate antibiotics </li></ul>
  5. 5. Is MRSA different from other “staph”? <ul><li>MRSA is a kind of “staph”. It can be carried on the skin or in the nose of healthy people, and may never cause an infection or make them sick (MRSA carriers). </li></ul><ul><li>It can cause minor skin infections that go away without any special medical treatment. </li></ul><ul><li>MRSA can cause skin infections that look just like infections caused by other “staph”. MRSA is also spread the same way as other “staph”. </li></ul><ul><li>More serious infections, such as pneumonia, bloodstream infections, or bone infections, are very rare in healthy people who get MRSA skin infections. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Does MRSA cause more serious infections than other “staph”? <ul><li>MRSA usually does not cause more serious problems than other “staph”. </li></ul><ul><li>Many MRSA skin infections are mild and heal by themselves when kept clean and dry. </li></ul><ul><li>Some MRSA, just like some “staph”, may produce substances that cause more severe infections </li></ul>
  7. 7. What do MRSA skin infections look like? <ul><li>Spider or bug bite (looks & feels like) </li></ul><ul><li>Infected skin/wound </li></ul><ul><li>Impetigo </li></ul><ul><li>Boil/abscess </li></ul>
  8. 8. Who Gets MRSA? Anyone can get MRSA!
  9. 9. Risk factors associated with MRSA infection <ul><li>The 5 C’s of MRSA : </li></ul><ul><li>C ontact; </li></ul><ul><li>C rowding; </li></ul><ul><li>C ontaminated items; </li></ul><ul><li>C ompromised skin integrity; and </li></ul><ul><li>C leanliness. </li></ul>
  10. 10. What increases the risk of MRSA infection? <ul><li>Close skin contact w/someone who has MRSA </li></ul><ul><li>Skin disease or injury </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of good hygiene </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing personal items or sports equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Overcrowded living conditions </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of access to healthcare </li></ul><ul><li>Incorrect use or overuse of antibiotics </li></ul>
  11. 11. How is MRSA spread? <ul><li>Skin to Skin Contact </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Touching MRSA infected skin </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Touching drainage from MRSA skin infection </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Surface to Skin Contact </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sharing personal items (bar soap, towels, clothes, sports equipment) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Touching surfaces that have MRSA on them like phones, keyboards, doorknobs </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Is MRSA the “flesh-eating” bacteria? <ul><li>Many bacteria can cause severe illness, including a very severe skin and soft tissue infection called “necrotizing fasciitis. </li></ul><ul><li>This kind of life-threatening infection is rare and can be caused by “staph”, including MRSA, and other kinds of bacteria. </li></ul>
  13. 13. How are MRSA skin infections treated? <ul><li>By a healthcare provider who may: </li></ul><ul><li>Drain the infection and/or </li></ul><ul><li>Prescribe an antibiotic based on culture results and/or </li></ul><ul><li>Help reduce the amount of bacteria on the skin and nose </li></ul>
  14. 14. Should schools close because of an MRSA infection? <ul><li>The decision to close a school for any communicable disease should be made by school officials in consultation with local and/or state public health officials. However, in most cases, it is not necessary to close schools because of an MRSA infection in a student. It is important to note that MRSA transmission can be prevented by simple measures such as hand hygiene and covering infections. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Should the school be closed to be cleaned or disinfected when an MRSA infection occurs? <ul><li>Covering infections will greatly reduce the risks of surfaces becoming contaminated with MRSA. In general it is not necessary to close schools to &quot;disinfect&quot; them when MRSA infections occur. MRSA skin infections are transmitted primarily by skin-to-skin contact and contact with surfaces that have come into contact with someone else's infection. </li></ul><ul><li>When MRSA skin infections occur, cleaning and disinfection should be performed on surfaces that are likely to contact uncovered or poorly covered infections. </li></ul><ul><li>Cleaning surfaces with detergent-based cleaners or Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered disinfectants is effective at removing MRSA from the environment. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The EPA provides a list of EPA-registered products effective against MRSA: http://epa.gov/oppad001/chemregindex.htm </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Should the entire school community be notified of every MRSA infection? <ul><li>Usually, it should not be necessary to inform the entire school community about a single MRSA infection. When an MRSA infection occurs within the school population, the school nurse and school physician should determine, based on their medical judgment, whether some or all students, parents and staff should be notified. Consultation with the local public health authorities should be used to guide this decision. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember that staphylococcus (“staph”) bacteria, including MRSA, have been and remain a common cause of skin infections </li></ul>
  17. 17. Should the school be notified that my child has an MRSA infection? <ul><li>Consult with your school about its policy for notification of skin infections. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Should students with MRSA skin infections be excluded from attending school? <ul><li>Unless directed by a physician, students with MRSA infections should not be excluded from attending school. </li></ul><ul><li>Exclusion from school and sports activities should be reserved for those with wound drainage (&quot;pus&quot;) that cannot be covered and contained with a clean, dry bandage and for those who cannot maintain good personal hygiene. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Practical Advice for Teachers <ul><li>If you observe children with open draining wounds or infections, refer the child to the school nurse. </li></ul><ul><li>Enforce hand hygiene with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizers (if available) before eating and after using the bathroom </li></ul>
  20. 20. Advice for School Health Personnel <ul><li>Students with skin infections may need to be referred to a licensed health care provider for diagnosis and treatment. School health personnel should notify parents/guardians when possible skin infections are detected. </li></ul><ul><li>Use standard precautions (e.g., hand hygiene before and after contact, wearing gloves) when caring for nonintact skin or potential infections. </li></ul><ul><li>Use barriers such as gowns, masks and eye protection if splashing of body fluids is anticipated. </li></ul>
  21. 21. How do we reduce the spread of MRSA? <ul><li>Protect others from infected wounds </li></ul><ul><li>Report all potential skin infections to the school nurse or health tech </li></ul><ul><li>Keep wounds covered with clean, dry bandages taped on all four sides </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t touch other people’s skin lesions </li></ul><ul><li>Stay home if wound drainage cannot be contained by clean, dry dressing </li></ul>
  22. 22. How do we reduce the spread of MRSA? <ul><li>Hand washing is the most important way! </li></ul><ul><li>Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds </li></ul><ul><li>(Antibacterial soap is not necessary) </li></ul><ul><li>Use alcohol based hand sanitizer (60% or greater) when soap/water not available - </li></ul><ul><li>(Supervise young children) </li></ul><ul><li>Wash visibly dirty hands with soap and water ––always! </li></ul>
  23. 23. How do we reduce the spread of MRSA? <ul><li>- Do not share personal items: </li></ul><ul><li>Bar soap, clothes, towels, bedding </li></ul><ul><li>- Shower: </li></ul><ul><li>Regularly after participating in team sports </li></ul>
  24. 24. How do we reduce the spread of MRSA? <ul><li>- Use barriers: </li></ul><ul><li>Gloves for cleaning </li></ul><ul><li>Towels on gym equipments/benches </li></ul><ul><li>Paper towel to turn off faucet after washing hands and to open bathroom doors </li></ul><ul><li>- Clean & disinfect: </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental surfaces that come in direct contact with skin </li></ul><ul><li>Sports equipment & gym mats </li></ul>
  25. 25. How do we reduce the spread of MRSA? <ul><li>- Clean and disinfect surfaces: </li></ul><ul><li>Clean first ––remove soil w/cloth, soap & water </li></ul><ul><li>Disinfect ––wipe down surfaces with disinfectant, may use wipes such as “Clorox” or “Lysol” (follow manufacturers directions) </li></ul><ul><li>Establish routine cleaning and disinfecting schedules </li></ul>
  26. 26. Teachers & administrative staff –Team up with custodians <ul><li>- Clean & disinfect: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Keyboards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phones </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Desktops, lunch tables </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Doorknobs, light switches </li></ul></ul>
  27. 27. Physical education teachers –Team up <ul><li>- Clean & disinfect : </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment (sports gear) that directly touch skin after each use </li></ul><ul><li>Practice surfaces (gym mats) after each use </li></ul>
  28. 28. Help families team up <ul><li>- Encourage: </li></ul><ul><li>Frequent hand washing & use of 60% </li></ul><ul><li>alcohol sanitizer when soap & water not </li></ul><ul><li>available </li></ul><ul><li>Showering immediately after sports </li></ul><ul><li>Wearing athletic uniforms once, then </li></ul><ul><li>washing them with soap/hot water & </li></ul><ul><li>drying in a hot dryer </li></ul><ul><li>Reporting skin infections to school nurse </li></ul><ul><li>or health tech </li></ul>
  29. 30. Protecting students from infections helps protect you …and your family
  30. 31. Things to Remember <ul><li>Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly </li></ul><ul><li>Do not share personal items </li></ul><ul><li>Clean and disinfect surfaces </li></ul><ul><li>Keep cuts covered to protect yourself and others </li></ul><ul><li>Report all skin infections to the school nurse or health tech </li></ul>
  31. 32. Resources <ul><li>Centers for Disease Control and Prevention </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/ar_mrsa_ca.html </li></ul></ul><ul><li>County of Los Angeles Department of Health Services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.lapublichealth.org/acd/mrsa.htm </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Tacoma/Pierce County Health Department, Tacoma, WA </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.tpchd.org </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Washington State Department of Health </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.doh.wa.gov/ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Health </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.mass.gov/dph/cdc/antibiotic/mrsa_about.htm </li></ul></ul>

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