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UbD Sept 2016

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UbD Sept 2016

  1. 1. Jacob Martens SD37 (Delta) @renomyclass renomyclass.com
  2. 2. Backward Design A Framework for Student Success
  3. 3. DISAPPOINTMENT = EXPECTATIONS ____________________________ REALITY
  4. 4. Hopes & Fears Hopes What is shared and discussed today grows your teaching You make a meaningful change next week Fears That someone will be missed out That what is said isn’t modeled by what is done
  5. 5. Learning Goals That today you leave you can say: I can distinguish between social engagement, academic engagement, and intellectual engagement. I can summarize the four key questions that allow me to check for intellectual engagement. I can summarize the three stages of Backward Design I can clarify and share learning intentions for my a topic that my students are currently studying
  6. 6. Give & Go On your card respond to the following stem: One thing that has a big impact on learning is … Find a someone at a different table than you. Read your cards to each other. Swap cards. Find someone new and read your “new” cards to each other. Swap cards again
  7. 7. What Did You Do In School Today (2009)
  8. 8. What Did You Do In School Today
  9. 9. What Did You Do In School Today (2009)
  10. 10. What Did You Do In School Today (2009)
  11. 11. Effect Size a scale used to evaluate the effect of various influences/interventions measures the amount of change effect size of 0.3 is barely noticeable effect size of 0.7 is clearly noticeable
  12. 12. Distribution of Effects 0.4
  13. 13. Hinge Point
  14. 14. Short List of Influences © 2011 Halbert & Kaser
  15. 15. Visible Learning for Teachers Synthesis of the results of 15 years of evidence-based research. Involved millions of students. Focused on what works in schools to improve learning AND links them to practical classroom implementation.
  16. 16. Key Questions For Learner Engagement & Connection How well do your students answer these questions? Who are two adults in this school who believe you will be a success in life? Where are you going with your learning? How is it (your learning) going? Where to next?
  17. 17. Can you name two adults in this building who believe you will be a success in life? https://youtu.be/aw29ecpDpoM
  18. 18. Need a framework © 2011 by Halbert & Kaser
  19. 19. Specific Strategies for Implementing Formative Assessment • Clarifying & Sharing Learning Intentions & Success Criteria • Eliciting Evidence of Learning • Providing Feedback That Moves Learning Forward • Peers as Instructional Resources for One Another • Students as Owners of Their Own Learning
  20. 20. Backward Design Text © 2011 by Wiggins & McTighe
  21. 21. Learning Intentions © 2011 by Mark Sample
  22. 22. Clear Learning Intentions A process I have used: 1. Photocopy “Suggested Achievement Indicators” 2. Re-write/Revise to make “student friendly” 3. Separate into Know’s & Do’s 4. Articulate the “Big Ideas” using KUD 5. Make a “flashy” newsletter
  23. 23. Science 9 Examples of the Process https://goo.gl/GL9db3 https://goo.gl/SZpGna
  24. 24. Examples of Know & Do See https://goo.gl/3g3Zu3
  25. 25. Question Number
  26. 26. More Examples Sample Enduring Understandings & Essential Questions Sample UbD Units English PE Teacher’s story
  27. 27. Working Time Do one of the following: Build a unit overview based on Knows & Dos Identify the Enduring Understandings & Essential Questions for a topic you teach Build a KUD for a topic you teach Other? http://renomyclass.com/ubd/
  28. 28. Learning Goals That today you leave you can say: I can distinguish between social engagement, academic engagement, and intellectual engagement. I can summarize the four key questions that allow me to check for intellectual engagement. I can summarize the three stages of Backward Design I can clarify and share learning intentions for my a topic that my students are currently studying
  29. 29. Thank You To help me grow, I would appreciate your feedback on this morning’s session. Please complete the evaluation form before you go. Thank you

Editor's Notes

  • Motivated by love or by fear

    What do you need for this to be successful?
    How will I know that we been successful?

    My job is NOT to tell
    My job is to facilitate your conversation (with various prompts)
  • Positive Deviance
  • 32000 students
    10 districts
    100 schools
    Across Canada
    Grade 6 -12
    Canadian Education Institute
  • Adolescent learners experience high levels of intellectual engagement when they encounter school work that is challenging, has practical and intellectual value, and engages them in authentic tasks similar to those that mathematicians, artists, or other professionals would pursue. School work of this nature is “worthwhile of students’ time and attention” and can bring about deep personal commitment and enthusiasm on the part of both teachers and students to investigate ideas, problems or questions for sustained periods (Friesen, 2009, p. 5).

    2012 image

    Not sure about data below
    32000 students
    Across Canada
    Grade 6 -12
    Canadian Education Institute
  • You know your kids better than me
    “Do they do the work if you don’t count it for marks?”
  • The school, a small junior high school in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, offers Grades 7–9 to a relatively low socio-economic group of approximately 270 students. It follows the provincial curriculum and is required to follow a regional school-improvement framework. Beginning in the 2007–08 school year, the school established learning goals and developed innovations aimed at increasing students’ experiences of intellectual engagement in learning. The change process at the school was led by the principal, whose desire to improve patterns of engagement and achievement at the school led her to become an enthusiastic early adopter of What did you do in school today? She quickly recognized that teaching for intellectual engagement required practices and ways of thinking that were new to most teachers at the school, and that it would take time to replace old norms with new approaches to teaching for engaged learning.
     

  • teacher/student relations
    classroom disciplinary climate,
    expectations for success were all correlated with annual gains in intellectual engagement

    Canada
    10 districts
    100 schools
    ~30,00 students

    What about international larger scale studies?


    High expectations for success
    positive teacher/student relations had strong relationships to gains in
    levels of intellectual engagement.


    • Classroom disciplinary climate had a still-significant but weaker relationship to gains.

  • Remember – we want to be strategic about our change.
    Positive Deviance
  • Anaylsis of 800 Meta-analysis’ of 180,000 individual studies
  • Formative Evaluation es 0.9 (teacher receiving and acting on feedback)
    Class size es=0.20

    Expectations WITH SUPPORT?
    With informed evidence based practices?
  • Handout Judy & Linda “Key Questions Document”
    Use visibly random grouping to form 10 groups.
    Read through & discuss
  • Rita youtube video?
  • Going further and more systematically/intentionally
  • Positive Deviance
  • ×