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Curso: Redes y comunicaciones II: 02 CaaS, NaaS

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Curso: Redes y comunicaciones II: 02 CaaS, NaaS

  1. 1. Semanas 05, 06, 08 y 09 Cloud Computing (cont) CaaS, NaaS Redes y Comunicaciones II Ingeniería de Redes y Comunicaciones Facultad de Ingeniería de Telecomunicaciones y Telemática Universidad Tecnológica del Perú Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza 2011-III V1
  2. 2. 2 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza Communications as a Service Hosted communications  The most popular reason for choosing hosting, cited by 50% of respondents, was the beneficial cost structure it delivers: no capital investment and a pay-as-you-go approach to expenses.  Eliminate the yearly budget battles that ensue when your on-premise gear needs to be upgraded or repaired.  Have a known fixed cost for your communications service and leave the upgrades to someone else.  Includes the ability to keep all call traffic on your network instead of sending it thousands of miles away to a data center. The number of CaaS agent positions will grow from 107k in 2008 to 331k in 2013 – a CAGR (compound average growth rate) of 25%. Gartner Feb. 2009. “Almost 60% of organizations are implementing UC services, up from 47% just last year … It’s this increased deployment of UC applications that has triggered evaluation and adoption of hosted and managed UC offering“. Nemertes Research, Aug. 2010. • Minimize capital expenditures and operating expenses • Less technical IT expertise required • Easier to deal with seasonal demands • Shared infrastructure for small call centers • Survivability that allows you to continue operating
  3. 3. 3 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza CaaS  Architects of CaaS solutions will be required to understand the networks and protocols that will be used to access the CaaS solution.  Moving to a CaaS solution means that employees may be located virtually anywhere, from a common corporate building or they can all be remote working from different locations. The features and functionality follow the user wherever their work takes them.  Can offer the enterprise user features such as desktop call control, presence, unified messaging, and desktop faxing.  Has a set of services for contact center automation that includes IVR, ACD, call recording, multimedia routing (e-mail and text chat), and screen pop integration.  Local call management devices are part of the total solution in several CaaS models making the worry of an outage a thing of the past.
  4. 4. 4 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza Introducción  Converged communications  Multiple services – video; voice; and data; accessible over multiple devices – wire-line telephone; mobile or smart phone; and PC (to mention a few).  As more services become available over multiple devices, the line between software applications and communications applications begins to blur.  Many of the traits traditionally associated with communications applications—such as event-driven connections established between endpoints (point-to-point conference, multi-cast) —using communications protocols will also become requirements of business or entertainment software.
  5. 5. 5 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza Introducción  SIP  The SIP infrastructure provides an environment for creating event- driven applications that contact the end user on the device of their preference.  Applications using SIP can communicate with end users wherever they are, on whatever device they specify, using multiple forms of media (video, voice, and data).
  6. 6. 6 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza Introducción  IP Multimedia Subsystem  IMS is a network component that may have an impact on how communications solutions are architected.  IMS is the element of Third Generation (3G) networks that facilitates the convergence of the Internet and cellular networks.
  7. 7. 7 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza Arquitectura de referencia
  8. 8. 8 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza Factors for selecting a CaaS methodology  Business Continuance/Disaster Recovery  Investment in Existing Equipment  Initial cost  Recurring cost  Functionality  Connectivity  Security  Administration  Survivability Currently, there are three primary types of CaaS offerings in the marketplace: • Hosted VoIP • Hosted TDM • Local Control/VoIP
  9. 9. 9 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza Hosted VoIP The primary equipment and telco circuits are located at one or more facilities operated by the hosting company. For best call quality, the customer should use a connection that supports Quality of Service (QoS) to prioritize and protect voice traffic over their network connection.
  10. 10. 10 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza Hosted TDM Good choice when disruption to the business could be more expensive than the cost of the equipment. Need for quick time-to-market, lack of personnel with sufficient network or VoIP expertise. Move to a new facility is in the near future or when investing in the current facility’s infrastructure doesn’t make sense. The hosted system connects the incoming call to the agent via a bridged call to the agent. Typically, the agent works behind a traditional PBX system using DIDs.
  11. 11. 11 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza Local Control/VoIP Helpful for customers who have or desire to create a robust local network supporting VoIP but need to add advanced functionality that their current system doesn’t support. Instead of replacing an entire phone system or creating a patchwork of existing features, the customer can connect to a more advanced system to provide greater functionality. While calls come into equipment located on the customer premises, call control is handled by the advanced phone system located in the hardened data center. The customer’s telco lines remain at the customer’s location. This works especially well when a customer has a preferred voice carrier, has existing contracts that must be fulfilled, or possesses many existing numbers they would prefer not to port or forward. They also avoid the costs of forwarding or bridging calls. Should the WAN connection to the datacenter be interrupted, calls can still be handled by the on premise equipment, although with less functionality. • Keep the voice path on your private network • Securely store recordings on local servers • Maintain customer data in local databases
  12. 12. 12 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza Network as a Service  Network Bandwidth on-demand (BoD)  Bandwidth on demand is a data communication technique for providing additional capacity on a link as necessary to accommodate bursts in data traffic, a videoconference, or other special requirements.  The technique is commonly used on dial-up lines and wide area networks (WANs) to temporarily boost the capacity of a link.  Some call it "rubber bandwidth" because the capacity can be increased or decreased as needed.  It is also called dynamic bandwidth allocation or load balancing.  A similar technique is bandwidth on time of day, which refers to providing additional capacity at specific times of the day.
  13. 13. 13 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza Network as a Service  Today we have CPUs and Storage on-demand, but we do not have Network Bandwidth on-demand. This business and technology challenges are important to enable economical solution for clouds interoperability (VMs migration, large data transfers, etc.)  NaaS enablers, including SLA/QoS management, addressing, mobility management, etc.  The ISP/Telco ability to deliver on-demand network services.  The need for relevant solutions and standards (Next generation networks, etc.).  With their valuable communications assets and massive subscriber base, the global (mobile) telecom network can tap the cloud computing market and provide valuable, revenue generating cloud computing capabilities in the form of Network as a Service (NaaS).
  14. 14. 14 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza NaaS  For MNOs, the increase in demand for mobile data services is a double- edged sword.  On one hand, they are gaining revenue to help offset losses in the voice business.  On the other hand, explosive growth of data traffic is not corresponding with the linear revenue growth previously experienced.  This results in taxed networks and puts MNOs in the uncomfortable position of enabling new services delivered via the Internet that benefit customers but don’t necessarily pay off for those making investments in the network.  In effect, they have been disintermediated from the value chain.  For MNOs to succeed, they require new sources of revenue that expose the latent value of network investments and they also must remain realistic about where, how and when value can be added by new business models. Fuente: The Yakee Group, Aug 2011
  15. 15. 15 Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza NaaS  Selling a service instead of access will be the future for all telecommunication companies to come.  MNOs (Mobile Network Operator) in order to retain control over their networks, while preventing customer churn, diminished profitability and brand devaluation, must shift their role from traffic carrier to “application enabler”. Fuente: telecom-cloud.net, Jul 2011
  16. 16. Ing. CIP Jack Daniel Cáceres Meza jack_caceres@hotmail.com Gracias por su atención ¿Preguntas?

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