An Introduction to Philosophy for Children
James Nottingham www.p4c.com
www.jamesnottingham.co.uk
The aim of a thinking
skills programme
such as P4C is not to
turn children into
philosophers but to
help them become
more ...
P4C programme by Lipman
Elfie (5 – 7) General Reasoning and Enquiry
Kio and Gus (5 – 10) Exploring Nature
Pixie (5 – 10) G...
• Children gained on average 6 standard points on a measure
of cognitive abilities after 16 months of weekly P4C
• Pupils ...
1.Sit in a circle
2.Share a story, text or other stimulus
3.Ask (philosophical) questions
4.Choose the best question
5. Id...
Developed during World War II, MBTI is a
personality indicator designed to identify
personal preferences
In a similar way ...
1. The only true wisdom is in knowing you know
nothing
6. By all means, marry. If you get a good wife, you'll
become happy...
www.jamesnottingham.co.uk
james@p4c.com
www.challenginglearning.com
Contact Details
Philosophy for Children, NZ
Philosophy for Children, NZ
Philosophy for Children, NZ
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Philosophy for Children, NZ

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Slides used by James Nottingham on 28th July 2011 at the Learning Network NZ conference

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  • The last 4 lines should be in a different colour, or in some way differentiated from the others, so that I can make the point about where lessons might be split
  • The story of the Pig of Happiness has been scanned into a separate PPT. So, if it’s possible to create a link here that will start up another PPT (just put in a dummy PPT for now) to save me than having to come out of this PPT and going into another PPT, then that would be great.
  • Philosophy for Children, NZ

    1. 1. An Introduction to Philosophy for Children James Nottingham www.p4c.com www.jamesnottingham.co.uk
    2. 2. The aim of a thinking skills programme such as P4C is not to turn children into philosophers but to help them become more thoughtful, more reflective, more considerate and more reason-able individuals P4C – Created by Matthew Lipman
    3. 3. P4C programme by Lipman Elfie (5 – 7) General Reasoning and Enquiry Kio and Gus (5 – 10) Exploring Nature Pixie (5 – 10) General Reasoning and Enquiry Harry (9 – 12) General Reasoning and Enquiry Lisa (12 – 15) Ethical Suki (13 – 16) Expression, Writing, Poetry Mark (14 – 17) Sociological
    4. 4. • Children gained on average 6 standard points on a measure of cognitive abilities after 16 months of weekly P4C • Pupils increased their level of participation in classroom discussion by half as much again following 6 months of weekly P4C • Incidents of children supporting their views with reasons, doubled over a 6 month period • Teachers doubled their use of open-ended questions over a 6 month period • Pupils and teachers perceived significant gains in communication, confidence, concentration, participation and social behaviour following 6 months of P4C Impact of P4C – research findings
    5. 5. 1.Sit in a circle 2.Share a story, text or other stimulus 3.Ask (philosophical) questions 4.Choose the best question 5. Identify the key concept 6. Listen to other perspectives 7. Apply critical and creative thinking 8. Consider progress Typical P4C Format
    6. 6. Developed during World War II, MBTI is a personality indicator designed to identify personal preferences In a similar way to left or right-handedness, the MBTI principle is that individuals also find certain ways of thinking and acting easier than others Sensing Introversion Judging Thinking Intuition Extroversion Perceiving Feeling Evidence Gut feeling Think to talk Talk to think Definite Possible Logic/Reason Empathy Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)
    7. 7. 1. The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing 6. By all means, marry. If you get a good wife, you'll become happy; if you get a bad one, you'll become a philosopher 4. It is not living that matters, but living rightly 3. Wisdom begins in wonder 2. The unexamined life is not worth living 5. True wisdom comes to each of us when we realize how little we understand about life, ourselves, and the world around us Quotes from Socrates (469 – 399 BC)
    8. 8. www.jamesnottingham.co.uk james@p4c.com www.challenginglearning.com Contact Details

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