Outstanding Early Years

12,942 views

Published on

These slides were used by James Nottingham with the Christ Church Primary cluster in Bexley on 13th June 2011

Published in: Education
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
12,942
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
12
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
142
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Outstanding Early Years

  1. 1. Outstanding Early Years Teaching<br />James Nottingham james@jnpartnership.com<br />www.osiriseducational.co.uk<br />
  2. 2. Outstanding Early Years<br /><ul><li> What is “outstanding” EY practice?
  3. 3. How can we scaffold and stretch children’s learning?
  4. 4. What type of praise underpins outstanding EY practice?
  5. 5. What role does reviewing play?</li></ul>222<br />
  6. 6. Focus on learning, not grades<br />“Pupils show greater motivation, are better behaved and are more likely to be independent and strategic thinkers when teachers are not obsessed by grades.”<br />“If there is one new thing we need in our school system right now, it is a well-developed focus on learning.”<br />Chris Watkins, Institute of Education, Aug 2010<br />From an analysis of 100 international studies on how children learn<br />
  7. 7. A new government, a new curriculum?<br />“The best schools & nurseries design learning for their pupils and then cross check against the national expectations to see they have done right by the pupils in terms of the agreedentitlement for all the nation’s children. The attainment targets give a touchstone for the expected standards and that’s it.”<br />Many schools believe the myths that have been peddled about the national curriculum and some current ministers seem to believe them too. The truth is nothing can be changed by statute until 2012. Even then, it will only be the national expectations. It doesn’t really matter what comes from government; how it is packaged, what it contains. In the end, the curriculum is the one that children in schools and nurseries meet day in, day out. <br />
  8. 8. Tickell Review Recommendations<br />
  9. 9. Not everything counts<br />Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts<br />Sign hanging in<br />Einstein's office at Princeton<br />
  10. 10. Outstanding<br /><ul><li>Most learners make well above average progress
  11. 11. Children behave very well and are engrossed in their work
  12. 12. Teaching is based on expert knowledge, is stimulating and rigorous
  13. 13. All learners are challenged and stretched
  14. 14. Assessment successfully underpins the teaching and learners know how to improve</li></ul>Good<br /><ul><li>Most learners make good progress
  15. 15. Children display good behaviour and attitudes
  16. 16. Teaching is well informed, confident, engaging and precise
  17. 17. Most children are suitably challenged and can succeed
  18. 18. Assessment is accurate, regular and consistent, & informs students how to improve</li></li></ul><li>What do these 3 have in common?<br />
  19. 19. Challenge<br />We need more stories and less facts, for narrative develops an understanding of sequence; we need more dialogue and less transmission of knowledge, for it is through dialogue that we learn most; and we need more challenge and less instruction, since it is from challenge that one grows in body, mind and spirit. <br />Matthew Lipman, 1991<br />
  20. 20.
  21. 21. What is challenge?<br />
  22. 22. Challenge and Learning<br />Too Hard<br />PA<br />Potential Ability<br />Learning Zone<br />CA<br />Current Ability<br />Practice Zone<br />SA<br />Subconscious Ability<br />Too Easy<br />82<br />
  23. 23. The Teaching Target Model (TTM)<br />PA<br />Learning Zone<br />CA<br />Performance<br />Practice Zone<br />SA<br />Time<br />85<br />
  24. 24. A continuously improving setting will have well-qualified and experienced staff who:<br />“... are committed to the development of sustained shared thinking by offering encouragement, clarifying ideas and asking open questions which support and extend children’s thinking and help them make connections in learning – while ensuring a balance between adult-led and child initiated activities” (EYFS 1.27)<br />
  25. 25. Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)<br />Developed during World War II, MBTI is a personality indicator designed to identify personal preferences<br />In a similar way to left or right-handedness, the MBTI principle is that individuals also find certain ways of thinking and acting easier than others<br />Evidence<br />Gut feeling<br />Sensing<br />Intuition<br />Think to talk<br />Talk to think<br />Introversion<br />Extroversion<br />Definite<br />Possible<br />Judging<br />Perceiving<br />Logic/Reason<br />Empathy<br />Thinking<br />Feeling<br />
  26. 26. Philosophy with Young Children<br />James Nottingham, www.jamesnottingham.co.uk<br />
  27. 27. Outstanding<br /><ul><li>Most learners make well above average progress
  28. 28. Children behave very well and are engrossed in their work
  29. 29. Teaching is based on expert knowledge, is stimulating and rigorous
  30. 30. All learners are challenged and stretched
  31. 31. Assessment successfully underpins the teaching and learners know how to improve</li></ul>Good<br /><ul><li>Most learners make good progress
  32. 32. Children display good behaviour and attitudes
  33. 33. Teaching is well informed, confident, engaging and precise
  34. 34. Most children are suitably challenged and can succeed
  35. 35. Assessment is accurate, regular and consistent, & informs students how to improve</li></li></ul><li>Kriticos = able to make judgments<br />Critical Thinking<br />Comes from the Greek, Kriticos<br />Meaning: able to make judgments<br />Source: www.etymonline.com<br />
  36. 36. What do we mean by “succeed”?<br />Learning Intentions<br />To explore numbers 1 - 10<br />Respond to others thoughts<br />Investigate importance of different body parts<br />Increase our awareness of different weather types<br />Learning Intentions<br />To know numbers 1 - 10<br />To express our thoughts<br />To name body parts<br />Describe different types of weather<br />
  37. 37. Pioneers of Educational Psychology<br />Piaget (1896 – 1980)<br />Vygotsky (1896 – 1934)<br />
  38. 38. Piaget <br />(1896 – 1980)<br />Biological<br />Development leads to learning<br />Knowledge is constructed<br />Focus on a child’s current ability (CA)<br />Vygotsky<br />(1896 – 1934)<br />Cultural<br />Learning leads to development <br />Knowledge is co-constructed<br />Focus on a child’s potential ability (PA)<br />
  39. 39. The Teaching Target Model (TTM)<br />PA<br />Learning Zone<br />CA<br />Performance<br />Practice Zone<br />SA<br />Time<br />85<br />
  40. 40. Once upon a time, there were three babies<br />
  41. 41. Some babies get lots of stimulation<br />
  42. 42. Are encouraged to read<br />
  43. 43. Develop their passions<br />
  44. 44. Whereas others have traumatic experiences<br />
  45. 45. Or are born into abject poverty<br />
  46. 46. By the time they start school<br />Some children start school knowing 6,000 words.<br />Others, just 500 words.<br />Source: BBC 2009<br />http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8013859.stm<br />
  47. 47. Number of words heard by children<br />A child in a welfare-dependent family hears on average 616 words an hour<br />500<br />A child in a working-class home hears on average 1,251 words an hour<br />700<br />A child in a professional home hears on average 2,153 words an hour<br />1100<br />Number of words spoken by the time children are 3<br />Hart & Risley, 1995<br />
  48. 48. Carol Dweck<br />www.carol-dweck.co.uk<br />
  49. 49. What matters is what you believe about intelligence<br />People who believe intelligence comes mainly from nature have a ‘fixed’ mindset<br />People who believe intelligence comes mainly from nurture have a ‘growth’ mindset<br />Professor Carol Dweck, Stanford<br />
  50. 50. Fixed vs Growth Mindsets<br />Growth<br />Intelligence is incremental<br />I’ve developed talents<br />My abilities change over time<br />I can get better at almost anything<br />Fixed<br />Intelligence is innate<br />I have gifts<br />I’ll always be good at certain things<br />I’ll never be good at other things<br />
  51. 51. Problematic praise<br />Clever girl!<br />Gifted musician<br />Brilliant mathematician<br />Bright boy<br />Top of the class!<br />By far the best<br />
  52. 52. The effects of different types of praise <br />Mueller and Dweck, 1998<br />In six studies, 7th grade students were given a series of nonverbal IQ tests.<br />
  53. 53. Mueller and Dweck, 1998<br />Intelligence praise<br />“Wow, that’s a really good score. You must be smart at this.” <br />Process praise<br />“Wow, that’s a really good score. You must have tried really hard.”<br />Control-group praise<br />“Wow, that’s a really good score.”<br />
  54. 54. Number of problems solved on a 3rd test<br />
  55. 55. Boys get 8 times more criticism than girls <br />
  56. 56. The effects of praise<br />Swimming<br />“You do your best swimming when you concentrate and try your best to do what Chris is asking you to do”<br />Ballet<br />“What a brilliant ballerina you are!”<br />A new Dawn (Fraser) ?<br />
  57. 57. Number of students who lied about their score<br />
  58. 58. Do our students want feedback?<br />
  59. 59. We praise children when they get 10 out of 10<br />10/10<br />
  60. 60.
  61. 61. 2<br />2<br />2<br />Key<br />2<br />
  62. 62. Vygotsky’s definition of play<br />Play involves …<br /><ul><li> Imaginary situations
  63. 63. Children taking roles
  64. 64. Each role has rules to be followed</li></ul>21<br />
  65. 65. Marshmallow Experiment, 1972<br />
  66. 66.
  67. 67. Outstanding<br /><ul><li>Most learners make well above average progress
  68. 68. Children behave very well and are engrossed in their work
  69. 69. Teaching is based on expert knowledge, is stimulating and rigorous
  70. 70. All learners are challenged and stretched
  71. 71. Assessment successfully underpins the teaching and learners know how to improve</li></ul>Good<br /><ul><li>Most learners make good progress
  72. 72. Children display good behaviour and attitudes
  73. 73. Teaching is well informed, confident, engaging and precise
  74. 74. Most children are suitably challenged and can succeed
  75. 75. Assessment is accurate, regular and consistent, & informs students how to improve</li></li></ul><li>Children Creating Stories Together<br />
  76. 76. 1. Girl or boy?<br />2. What is she/he wearing?<br />3. What object is she/he holding?<br />4. Where’s she/he going?<br />5. On the way, she/he meets …?<br />6. Unfortunately …<br />7. Fortunately …<br />8. Then the weather changed …<br />9. Bringing with it …<br />10. Finally …<br />
  77. 77. Contact Details<br />www.jamesnottingham.co.uk<br />james@p4c.com<br />www.challenginglearning.com<br />

×