How to Plan for Effective Line Integration.
Jim Streblow Sales Engineering Nercon Eng. & Mfg., Inc. Michael Weickert Application Engineering Nercon Eng. & Mfg., Inc. ...
How to Plan for Effective Line Integration. Environment Parameters Equipment Interface Safety
How to Plan for Effective Line Integration. System Architecture Information Management Networks
How to Plan for Effective Line Integration. Acquisition Cost Cost of Ownership System Reliability
Environment Washdown Extreme Cold Room Temp High Temperature
Environment: Wash Down <ul><li>Nema 4, 4X </li></ul><ul><li>Stainless Steel </li></ul><ul><li>Slope Top </li></ul>
Environment: Cold / Frozen <ul><li>Nema  12, 4, 4X </li></ul>
Environment: Room Temperature Nema-12 <ul><li>Nema 12 </li></ul>
Environment:  Summary
Flow Control: Symbiotic Relationships
Flow Control – OEM Equipment Parameters RINSER <ul><li>Production Rates </li></ul>
Flow Control – OEM Equipment Parameters RINSER <ul><li>Production Rates </li></ul><ul><li>Ramp Up and Ramp Down Time </li>...
Flow Control – OEM Equipment Parameters RINSER <ul><li>Production Rates </li></ul><ul><li>Ramp Up and Ramp Down Time </li>...
Flow Control – OEM Equipment Parameters RINSER <ul><li>Production Rates </li></ul><ul><li>Ramp Up and Ramp Down Time </li>...
Flow Control – OEM Equipment Parameters RINSER COMBINER <ul><li>Production Rates </li></ul><ul><li>Ramp Up and Ramp Down T...
Flow Control – Cyclic Output Equipment DEPALLETIZER
Flow Control – Symbiotic Relationship
Flow Control –  Continuous Flow Equipment RINSER FILLER RINSER
Flow Control Devices :  To Servo or Not to Servo Clamps Pushers
Flow Control Devices:  To Servo or Not to Servo 1:3 Laner SERVO PNEUMATIC
Flow Control – Islands of Automation RINSER FILLER FILLER RINSER
Islands of Automation  – Back Up Detect Sensors Filler  Back  Up Rinser  Back UP FILLER RINSER
Filler  Back  Up FILLER RINSER Islands of Automation  – Hi / Low sensors Filler  Low Prime Filler  High Prime Rinser  Low ...
Islands of Automation  – Overlapping Islands Rinser  Back UP FILLER RINSER Filler  Low Prime Filler  High Prime
Islands of Automation  – Overlapping Islands Filler  Low Prime Filler  High Prime Rinser  Back UP FILLER RINSER Filler  Lo...
Islands of Automation -  Integration Sensors Filler  Low Prime Filler  High Prime Rinser  Back UP FILLER RINSER Filler  Lo...
Flow control. Do you need jam detection?
Flow Control – Back Up / Jam detection Jam Detect Jam Detect Jam Detect Jam Detect Integration High Prime  Product Flow
Safety
Safety – One Zone or Two
Safety – One Zone or Two
Flow Control – Tying It All Together
Control Hardware: Save versus Spend <ul><li>Fuses: </li></ul><ul><li>Save initial cost </li></ul><ul><li>Provide better ci...
Motor Starters: Use when conveyor speeds are below 100 FPM or when soft start is not required. Control Hardware:  Motor Co...
Control Hardware:  Motor Control <ul><li>Mid Level Drives: </li></ul><ul><li>15 or more drives, units become more cost eff...
Control Hardware:  Servo Motion How to save on PLCs. Don’t over-specify components in the name of uniformity. Which PLC sh...
Technical Selection.
Technical Selection.  Operator Interface
Control Architecture Considerations <ul><li>System Architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Information R...
Control Architecture Considerations DECISION MAKERS
How will your new line integrate with your existing equipment? System Architecture:  Highly Integrated vrs. Islands of Aut...
How will your control networks interact with existing networks? System Architecture:  Stand Alone Machine HMI SWITCH COMMU...
How will your new machinery interact with existing networks? System Architecture:  Facility Integration LEVEL 5 ENTERPRISE...
System Architecture:  Facility Integration LEVEL 1 PROCESS CONTROL LEVEL 0 DEVICES
What level of diagnostics and functionality do you need? Networks: Device Level Armor Starts
Would saving space or wiring time be beneficial? M12 Connectivity Networks: Distributed Control PROPOSED NETWORK ARCHITECT...
Networks: Distributed Control
Area C – Safety on EtherNet/IP Area B - ControlNet Networks: Distributed Control Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) seamless...
System Architecture: Safety
<ul><li>INFORMATION ENABLED </li></ul><ul><li>Ease of communication between machinery </li></ul><ul><li>Immediate Operator...
<ul><li>KEYS TO SAFE AND EFFICIENCT PRODUCTIVITY </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure safety devices and systems are flexible. </li...
How do you plan to monitor or troubleshoot your new line? Information Requirements: Diagnostics
What type of production management or reporting data do you need?  Manufacturing Intelligence Web Enabled Scalable Histori...
Ethernet/IP is topology neutral for maximum flexibility Topography Flexibility with EtherNet /IP
Past: Supply Machine The Changing Scope of Supply
Past: Supply Machine Present: Integrate to Other Machines The Changing Scope of Supply
Past: Supply Machine Present: Integrate to Other Machines Future: Provide a Complete Line Integration The Changing Scope o...
System Focused Machine Focused Value Oriented Technically Oriented The Changing Scope of Supply
<ul><li>VALUE </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Overall Equipment Effectiveness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Energy Usage Control </li><...
Purchase cost vs. Cost of Ownership $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Total Cost of Ownership $$$ Jim Streblow  speaking Acquisition...
Thank you for your time today! www.nercon.com www.rockwellautomation.com Jim Streblow and Mike Weickert Terry Gansen
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How to Plan for Line Controls and Integration

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An introduction to line controls for conveyor lines handling consumer goods packaging. Learn key criteria in comparing controls packages.bid

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  • Welcome to today’s webinar on HOW TO PLAN FOR EFFECTIVE LINE INTEGRATION.
  • On now our speakers.
  • Today we are going to be discussing the elements and factors that go into material handling line integration. Under Design, we’ll be discussing: Environment and project parameter (equipment) assessment Packaging equipment operational interface Safety considerations Then we will stop for Questions and Answers after the DESIGN segment.
  • In the Development stage, we’ll be talking about: System Architecture and best use strategies Information Management and Networks
  • And for Delivery, we’ll be covering: Purchase cost versus Cost of Ownership And system reliability -Information reporting -Up time performance We’ll have another Q &amp; A after the Deliver segment as well. Presenting today will be Mike Weickert from Nercon and Terry Gansen from Rockwell Automation. They will be guiding you through the logical steps and considerations that affect planning for line integration. And now to discuss DESIGN… Mike Weickert…
  • We will begin with Environmental considerations. Our example here is a baked goods plant. We have process rooms -- where raw products are handled that requires high pressure wash-down, an oven area with high temperatures, a freezer and some room temperature packaging. We want to show you how the environment can affect planning for controls and costs.
  • Process Room WASH DOWN – NEMA 4, 4x, IP69K The primary concern in a process environment is the high pressure, caustic, wash down process used to sanitize the equipment. High pressure wash-down requires a specialized group of sensors designed to withstand up to 1200 PSI of water pressure. The most costly aspect of this environment is that the control enclosure typically has a NEMA 4/4X rating and it’s constructed from stainless steel. Sloped top enclosures are effective at reducing water pooling, but also increase the cost of enclosures.
  • Cold / Frozen – Nema 12, 4, 4X In frozen environments the primary concern has to do with the availability of actuators that will work. In FREEZERS: Pneumatic devices begin to fail below 35 degrees Fahrenheit. Electric actuators and motors begin to fail around 20 degrees Fahrenheit. H.M.I.’s often require heaters to keep them operational.
  • DRY Room Temperature – NEMA 12 Dry Nema type 12 environments are the generally the preferred location for most control devices both from a cost and flexibility standpoint. The enclosures can be painted carbon steel. And there is a much larger variety of sensors and actuators available.
  • To summarize the environments… We can save money by relocating the control enclosure from a caustic wash-down environment to a Nema 12 dry environment and replace the stainless steel enclosure with a carbon steel one. This will Save 200% - 300% on enclosure costs. You can save another 10% - 20% by eliminating the slop top. To save actuator costs, relocate product manipulation from frozen – to room temperature environments.
  • I’d like to start talking about various OEM equipment parameters, the conveyor layout, and overall line integration. When I say “Line integration”, I really want to emphasize that this includes both physical integration through conveyor layout, and the electronic integration controlled by a PLC. The truth is, that there is a symbiotic relationship , or a “give and take” between the OEM equipment, the conveyor layout, and the “Line Integration” scheme.
  • What are the important OEM equipment parameters to consider? To start with, what are the Production Rates ? Production rates will determine the conveyor and lines speeds.
  • Ramp Up Time is measured from a stop to full run at production speed. Ramp Down Time is measured from a full run to a complete stop .
  • Purge Quantity is the number of units or products that the machine produces during a stop cycle .
  • Speed Modulation is used to link the production rates of 2 pieces of equipment, so that one machine does not out perform the other resulting in stoppages of either machine.
  • Cyclic equipment produces products in groups and requires conveyor buffering. Equipment with continuous product flow benefits more from an electronic integration.
  • The Depalletizer that is highlighted in the example has a cyclic operation . It releases a relatively large amount of product in a short period of time followed by a period of no product release while the pallet stack advances to the next layer. In this example, Line Integration is primarily accomplished by ensuring the conveyor system has sufficient accumulation or buffering capacity to hold enough product to satisfy the downstream equipment while the palletizer cycles. I would just like to mention that Nercon has previously given in depth webinars on the subjects of buffering and accumulation. Visit nercon.com for links to these webinars.
  • Here is an example of a symbiotic relationship between the cyclic depalletizer and the conveyor layout. In the top image we have enough buffering for the cycling of a single layer, but not quite enough to allow for an empty pallet to be cycled out and a new pallet loaded. The lower image is a revised layout with added conveyor to provide the buffering necessary for an empty pallet to be unloaded, and a full pallet to be re-loaded before downstream equipment consumes the product. This example is shows that line integration is not simply about electronic interfacing of equipment, but rather an overall integration approach that takes in both the physical and the electronic requirements.
  • Both the filler and the rinser are examples of Continuous Output machines that typically require a high level of electronic integration to compensate for being closely connected with other equipment. Speed modulation allows the production rates of multiple machines to be more closely synched together, thereby allowing the equipment to be located more closely together. The purge quantity , and the room required to receive products, is a major factor in determining conveyor distances between equipment. Now we’re back to that symbiotic relationship again – this time through the use of electronic integration.
  • A question that I am often asked is, “When should you use servo technology and when should your use a simpler technology such as pneumatic devices ?” Pneumatic devices offer lower acquisition costs and generally don’t require a specialized skill set to maintain. Servo technology provides solutions that can’t be met with other technologies. They also can lower overall unit costs through improvements in line efficiencies and reduced maintenance and utility costs. The difficult part is determining when it is necessary and when it is simply additional cost. As far as Clamps and Stops are considered, they almost never require servo technology. And Pushers seldom require servos unless stroke lengths are quite long and cycle rates exceed 40 pushes per minute . Smart designs, like pushing multiple products, can decrease the cycle rate to acceptable levels for pneumatic devices.
  • Continuing on with Servo versus Pneumatic Devices … Common Servo Devices ARE: Lane dividers or divert gates, smart belt merges, flying knives, and retractable conveyor nosers. In our layout, we have a 1:3 Laner to divide the product into 3 lanes. The Laner can be either a pneumatic slug and release (like on the left photo) or a continuous motion servo system (like on the right photo). How do we determine which is the right solution? Pneumatic laners cost significantly less than servo laners but require additional conveyor space upstream and downstream to build and receive the slugs. For our layout example, we chose a servo solution, because there is insufficient room between the Laner and the Case Packer to receive the 2-3 slugs necessary for smooth operation. To save money on servo’s, Use your conveyor system’s PLC instead of a stand alone controller. And, Ethernet servo controllers eliminate the need for motion control cards.
  • Now… to introduce the concept of Islands of Automation “ Islands of Automation” refers to each piece of O.E.M. equipment as being fully automated, with its own independent control system. “ Islands of Automation” are fully capable of running product without direct communication or knowledge of what the other equipment on the line is doing. In our layout, we’ll show an example of how the line integrator uses the machine parameters that we talked about to coordinate the filler island and the rinser island into a single line control strategy.
  • O.E.M. Equipment Control packages typically include downstream back-up detection … that’s telling the machine when to stop in order to prevent equipment damage. As you can see, we’ve indicated the back-up detection sensors for the rinser and the filler .
  • Continuing with our Islands of Automation example… Upstream sensors monitor product levels at the machine infeed and control when the machine should go fast, slow or stop. The circles around the machines represent the “Islands of Automation” control boundaries. In our example, these boundaries overlap which would result in lower production rates as each piece of equipment is simply trying to perform at its own maximum rate unaware of the other equipment near it. The Hi and Low Prime Sensors are shown with dark blue call-outs.
  • If we look closely, we can see that the back-up detect sensor of the Rinser overlaps the upstream Hi level sensor of the filler. The result is that the Rinser goes into stopping mode just before the filler ramps up to high speed.
  • How do we solve for the stopping of the rinser? A simple solution would be to simply re-locate the sensors so that they don’t overlap, like we have shown in the example. In some situations this might do the job. In many situations, the sensors will now be located too close to their equipment to do the job they were intended for.
  • To run more efficiently, we need to add 2 sensors between the Filler and the Rinser. These are “integration” sensors that are indicated with the green call-outs. They are used by the host PLC to modulate the speed of the Rinser and the conveyors through the single filer to maintain a steady flow of product. This is important is because no 2 pieces of equipment run at exactly the same speed, causing one to be backed-up into or starved. In an integrated solution, the speed of the Rinser would be modulated, as determined by the status of the integration sensors, to provide a steady supply of product to the filler.
  • Continuing with flow control, we need to talk about jam detection . Most packaging conveyor lines need jam detection. But in a well designed control system, jam detection sensors serve multiple purposes including backup detection and flow monitoring.
  • Back Up detection, flow monitoring and jam detection are some often overlooked aspects of line integration that really tie the system together. Back Up detection is really used to monitor product flow and provide minor product accumulation and buffering. Typically these are located between the 60% and 75% fill level of the conveyor. By monitoring the product flow we can run the system faster when more product is present and slow down when we have consumed accumulated product. In our layout, we show where jam detection back-up sensors are used next to the blue call-outs to automatically stop equipment before damage occurs and to alert the operator to where a problem is located. Often, sensors already used for other control purposes such as clamps, stops and Prime control can also be used to perform Jam detection.
  • No system design would be complete without addressing safety . An important and interrelated aspect of safety is Risk Assessment . For the purposes of our discussion the Risk assessment determined a category 2 safety level. Briefly, Category 2 means a dual or 2 wire safety circuit that provides redundancy to reduce the possibility of the failure of the circuit to remove power. Today&apos;s technologies allow for many different safety solutions that can be substantially different in hardware technology as well as cost.
  • Many people still view safety circuits as added expense. But, if we were to design our safety system for the lowest possible price, we would end up with something that is initially inexpensive, but costs us more in the long run. For example, the simplest and cheapest safety system we could design would be for a single safety circuit beginning at the depalletizer discharge and running to the infeed of the case packer as shown on the slide. Although this would have the lowest acquisition costs, it would also end up have a substantially higher cost of ownership due to lost productivity.
  • A more efficient approach is to split the safety circuit into 2 or more zones. This allows some equipment to continue running while others are stopped. By splitting the system into 2 zones near the Rinser discharge, an e-stop downstream of the Rinser would stop just the conveyors in that zone . The conveyors upstream of the Rinser would continue to run until the buffering conveyors become full. There can also be sub zones within a zone. Devices like our servo laner may have a safety subzone to allow the device to be serviced while the equipment upstream and downstream continue to run.
  • Tying it all together. To keep this system running as efficiently as possible means that we coordinate all the Islands of automation. Looking at this line we can see that although the Rinser and the filler are the main flow control components, we also need to look at the single filer and the bundler to develop an overall strategy. The discharge side of the single filer will need to be speed modulated to provide a steady flow of product to the Rinser. Near the end of the system we need to monitor that both the 1:3 Laner and the case packer are running and “Ready To Receive” product. We use the back-up sensors to insure that we aren’t over feeding these devices to the point where we need to stop the filler. We coordinate all this through the proper planning and selection of control hardware.
  • Planning and selecting components… Circuit protection is the first place to make some good choices. Fuses not only save initial costs…up to 75%...but they provide better circuit protection than circuit breakers, by increasing the SCCR rating and decreasing the ARC Flash potential -- all while requiring less panel space.
  • Motor Control is another great place to save money. Often companies have specifications for high end motor controls that really are not required in most integration applications. To save money we need to look at the “Job To Be Done” and select the correct drive accordingly. For conveyors this typically means soft start, adjustable speed, and multiple speed. Motor Starters are the lowest cost effective solution but have limitations. Conveyor speeds below 100 FPM where soft starting is not required. Variable speed drives like a Power Flex 4 offer the best value from a purely control perspective. That is they do the job to be done. But they have limitations in that they can’t communicate with the PLC and require several PLC I/O points if more than one speed is desired.
  • Control Hardware – Motor Control Mid level drives, like a Power Flex 40, are cost effective and offer the communications required for high level H.M.I. diagnostics. In systems with 15 or more drives, these units become even more cost effective due to the reduced wiring labor. With High end drives like a Power Flex 70, their value comes into play when you need servo like control for higher speed indexing applications, and where the added bus protection increases drive life. Safe Off options save additional money by eliminating safety contactors, and their associated panel space and wiring. On Machine Drives, like the Armor Starts, offer exceptional cost of ownership with savings beginning at installation. Although a higher initial cost, you need to consider the savings such as: reduced PLC I/O and panel space You eliminate the local motor disconnect reduced field wiring decreased line commissioning time and increased system expandability.
  • How to Save on P.L.C.s (Programmable Logic Controllers.) Much like motor controls, saving money on a PLC really comes down to specifying the correct PLC. Companies regularly over-spend thousands of dollars per application by over-specifying components in the name of uniformity. The real question is “How do we know which PLC to use?” We start by defining the Jobs to be Done or the features required. Ethernet communications, whether built in or available as a rack module, is almost universally required. Do you require other Communication Networks?: Device Net, Field Bus, Profibus, etc. What about Servo Motion Control? In our line example application that we’ve used throughout this presentation, we chose a small P.L.C., such as a Compact Logix, which has the necessary features including servo motion control and multiple communication networks.
  • Another question I’m often asked is, “Should I invest in a H.M.I. operator interface ?” Whether your project is a relatively simple application with just a few pieces of O.E.M. equipment, or a highly integrated system with advanced diagnostics, you can benefit from a Human Machine Interface . This is one of the best places to spend a little extra money that offers the best short and long term cost of ownership.
  • To illustrate the cost savings, both the push button based operator interface on the left and the HMI screen on the right are indicating the same fault. With the push button interface it takes the operator several minutes to determine the location of the fault and correct it. With the HMI screen, the location of the problem is clearly identified. If the system has advanced diagnostics, the exact nature of the fault can be displayed for even faster resolution of problems. The complexity of you data management goals will determine the appropriate HMI. Joyce is going to take us through some questions now.
  • In a typical manufacturing facility, there are many disparate systems. Trying to bring these individualized systems together leads to costly integration, and it ends up being too individualized for each location. When planning for effective line integration, it is critical to understand the options you have when determining the control architecture. Understanding the overall system architecture How your networks are used And how information is used in the system.
  • Now “top floor” decision makers need access to real information in the control system, to do this you need an “information enabled” structure that gives some context to this data. For example, not only is it important to know when the pump has an alarm, but what are the run time hours? What are the set points and when were they last changed? Building “standard” data structures across all your equipment gives quick and easy access to the right information at the right time.
  • One of the first decisions to make is how your new line will integrate with existing equipment – will it be highly integrated or effectively a stand alone, island of automation? There are benefits to both strategies, and different controls designs for each. Highly integrated control architectures allow the owner to seamlessly pass data from one machine to the next while stand alone equipment operates with simple digital signals from one machine to the next.
  • When bringing new control networks into your facility, it’s critical to understand how those networks will interact and impact your existing networks—if you don’t you could have some set backs. By spending a little time up front with your IT department, you could save a lot of time during the integration process. This picture is depicting a typical isolated machine that may be using Ethernet/IP as its control network. Because of the standardization of Ethernet, most end users would take this machine and connect it directly into their existing network, but is that a good idea if you have not planned for that integration? You need to ask more questions: What protocols does that new network need or use? What IP addresses does it use? What security aspects are needed to properly integrate this new equipment while still possibly providing the OEM remote access to assist with startup?
  • Continuing with the topic of Ethernet; While simple to use, you need to think it through when planning facility integration. On this slide, we’re highlighting the connectivity on the various operational levels and the green lines represent Ethernet. When all of your control equipment is connected with Ethernet to this little box called a switch, how does that little device truly function? The traditional proprietary networks required manually setting all node identifications and communications rate, but now Ethernet automatically assigns an address and auto negotiates the baud rate. So once a system is running steady state, what happens if something in the control system triggers another ‘auto negotiate’ again? … The result would be halting active production at that time, creating more downtime.
  • As we zoom in on Level 0 and Level 1 in this overall architecture, you’ll see a variety of networks in use (represented by different colors,) so it doesn’t always have to be Ethernet down to the individual devices. Let’s take a look at the some of the device level network architectures.
  • When it comes to the Device Level, you have many options and you need to decide what devices actually need to be on the control network you’re installing. IO and HMI are obvious, but depending on the level of information you are providing, and the level of diagnostics you need, you might also want to include variable speed drives, photoelectric sensors, overload relays, and others. Adding these devices potentially increase the complexity of your network, but also add significant functionality. Equipment in the top half of this diagram are being shown in typical cabinets, like what Mike had talked about earlier. We are also showing Armor products that can be deployed without a traditional cabinet.
  • Another consideration is to use a distributed controls architecture. In a distributed controls architecture, you are typically mounting control hardware (like IO modules, variable speed drives, etc) on the machinery at the usage point instead of mounting it in a centrally located control panel. You see in this sample architecture provided by Nercon, that the bottom 4 ‘legs’ are based upon the DeviceNet network represented by blue, while we interconnect all the controllers using EtherNet/IP shown in green. This variety of network usage is because Rockwell has adopted a Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) as its basis for each of its main networks: DeviceNet, ControlNet and EtherNet/IP.
  • Rockwell Automation uses the term On Machine when referring to distributed architecture hardware. While an On Machine IO Block or Drive usually has a higher acquisition price, it is offset by savings in wiring, panel space reduction, and wiring error reduction. Distributed architectures also increase the ease of diagnostics. Look for OnMachine products that can still provide individual point diagnostics with some type of LED indicator. Maintenance folks like having a light at the I/O point telling them if the sensor or limit switch changes states. If that service person or operator can do so without opening cabinets and donning the required personal protective gear, their lives are much easier, and downtime can be reduced.
  • Seamlessly moving data, across multiple networks, without extra programming code or special protocol bridging modules, is the goal to successful line integration. CIP (Common Industrial Protocol) is a standard that allows data to flow seamlessly across a variety of networks. With CIP, a person can attach to the network like at the maintenance station shown in the lower middle of Area B, and whether that is on ControlNet or Ethernet, as is typical today, that person can seamlessly see all the connected control equipment. This ‘one stop’ for a service or maintenance person makes troubleshooting a complete system, much easier. The goal is to bring machines together to improve efficiencies, create access to actionable diagnostics, while monitoring safety.
  • So if you think about the large variety of machines and processes that try to operate safely, you can imagine that simply removing power is not the best solution, or may not be realistic in some situations. It may be beneficial or even required to have the machine operate very slowly or in reverse direction in order for the jam to be removed. Other maintenance such as roller cleaning can also be completed while the safety routine is being executed. This type of functionality requires more than safe removal of electrical power, and is handled by Rockwell’s Safe Speed Control technology, using Safe Limited Speed and Safe Direction.
  • So “Why is safety important to the system architecture?” The answer is that having a system architecture that is Information Enabled allows for easy communications between machinery, alerting the operator with helpful information that doesn’t take endless hours to develop, and provides efficient data to reduce downtime troubleshooting. We show here where the servo position drive takes the device input directly from the E-stop or door switch, eliminating the need for separate safety relay or safety controller
  • Safety has typically been thought of as something that strictly adds cost to your control system because the rated devices are expensive, and the easiest design is to just simply kill power – leaving a machine or line with increased downtime. But, proactive end users are using integrated safety solutions that are functionally safe, flexible, task oriented, and enhance their productivity. Integrated safety allows for safe zone shut downs, allowing the rest of your line to function and remain productive. There are many options available that include individual devices, safety relays and safety controllers. The key to keeping the line most efficient with safe productivity is two-fold: Make sure your systems provide the greatest flexibility in communications options, and Make sure that your safety control system has an information enabled structure which is key to maintaining efficient and safe productivity.
  • Productivity can also be improved with proper diagnostics. When you plan for a new line integration, your control system should be designed to effectively use the information available to maximize uptime. Monitoring information such as the full load current of a motor, or the available margin on a sensor can help predict a potential downtime and bring that information to the attention of your operators.
  • Your new line will be capable of producing a significant amount of information. When planning for your new line integration, it is important to determine up-front how you would like to use this information – are you integrating into a production management system or providing reporting data? How would you like to access the data? Historical data for trending can now be stored in the controller chassis, eliminating the need for highly available networks and servers. Multiple ‘machine historians’ can be rolled into an overall historian strategy where web based reporting can query that data and multiple users can simultaneously analyze for production improvements. Much of this web growth and ethernet growth in general has led to a trend in converging the industrial network options. Let’s look at how this may impact you.
  • Growing your network easily into the future should be a main goal of your integration efforts, and ethernet allows us many more options of interconnectivity than proprietary networks in the past. Here we show a variety of network architectures, depending upon your goals, you have many options available. The linear approach reduces the wiring cost to ‘home run’ everything back to a central switch, like in the traditional ethernet star on the upper right. The ring in the lower right allows those desiring higher availability for their control network with minimal added cost. If a segment goes down or port is bad, traffic is automatically re-routed without losing any information or dropping any connections.
  • To summarize the ‘Deploy’ aspect of planning your line integration, we need to change the scope of supply to not simply provide a low cost machine comprised of simple components that have limited communication and information capability. And largely, manufacturers are understanding this.
  • And manufacturers are moving toward supplying specifications so that there is uniform connection capability across their machinery that they need to integrate. We also need to look past our current needs and to examine the requirements of the future.
  • The complete line concept means that we are actively trying to reduce integration time by providing advanced network capabilities and optimized design tools because we have to change from being machine focused, to more system focused.
  • Manufacturing is undergoing another revolution, tracking costs like energy by product instead of spreading that across the entire organization. As capital funding becomes increasingly scrutinized, having a valid method to determine machine OEE (overall efficiency) becomes a requirement. Develop you plan for line integration that expands past machine focus to an overall system focused strategy. The value is in machine and plant integration, network access and security, IT control, and integration and support.
  • The value oriented result is: equipment effectiveness control over energy usage and return on investment. And now to focus on the final segment “Delivering information,” I’ll turn it over to Jim.
  • Nercon Engineering and Rockwell Automation both thank you for your time today. More information can be found on their websites at www.nercon.com and www.rockwellautomation.com. Be sure to email your additional questions to: [email_address] Also, Jim Streblow, Mike Weickert and Terry Gansen invite you to join their networks on LinkedIn.
  • How to Plan for Line Controls and Integration

    1. 1. How to Plan for Effective Line Integration.
    2. 2. Jim Streblow Sales Engineering Nercon Eng. & Mfg., Inc. Michael Weickert Application Engineering Nercon Eng. & Mfg., Inc. Terry Gansen Solution Architect Rockwell Automation How to Plan for Effective Line Integration. Jessica Jacobson Communications Nercon Eng. & Mfg., Inc.
    3. 3. How to Plan for Effective Line Integration. Environment Parameters Equipment Interface Safety
    4. 4. How to Plan for Effective Line Integration. System Architecture Information Management Networks
    5. 5. How to Plan for Effective Line Integration. Acquisition Cost Cost of Ownership System Reliability
    6. 6. Environment Washdown Extreme Cold Room Temp High Temperature
    7. 7. Environment: Wash Down <ul><li>Nema 4, 4X </li></ul><ul><li>Stainless Steel </li></ul><ul><li>Slope Top </li></ul>
    8. 8. Environment: Cold / Frozen <ul><li>Nema 12, 4, 4X </li></ul>
    9. 9. Environment: Room Temperature Nema-12 <ul><li>Nema 12 </li></ul>
    10. 10. Environment: Summary
    11. 11. Flow Control: Symbiotic Relationships
    12. 12. Flow Control – OEM Equipment Parameters RINSER <ul><li>Production Rates </li></ul>
    13. 13. Flow Control – OEM Equipment Parameters RINSER <ul><li>Production Rates </li></ul><ul><li>Ramp Up and Ramp Down Time </li></ul>
    14. 14. Flow Control – OEM Equipment Parameters RINSER <ul><li>Production Rates </li></ul><ul><li>Ramp Up and Ramp Down Time </li></ul><ul><li>Purge Quantity </li></ul>
    15. 15. Flow Control – OEM Equipment Parameters RINSER <ul><li>Production Rates </li></ul><ul><li>Ramp Up and Ramp Down Time </li></ul><ul><li>Purge Quantity </li></ul><ul><li>Speed Modulation </li></ul>
    16. 16. Flow Control – OEM Equipment Parameters RINSER COMBINER <ul><li>Production Rates </li></ul><ul><li>Ramp Up and Ramp Down Time </li></ul><ul><li>Purge Quantity </li></ul><ul><li>Speed Modulation </li></ul><ul><li>Cyclic or Continuous Output </li></ul>
    17. 17. Flow Control – Cyclic Output Equipment DEPALLETIZER
    18. 18. Flow Control – Symbiotic Relationship
    19. 19. Flow Control – Continuous Flow Equipment RINSER FILLER RINSER
    20. 20. Flow Control Devices : To Servo or Not to Servo Clamps Pushers
    21. 21. Flow Control Devices: To Servo or Not to Servo 1:3 Laner SERVO PNEUMATIC
    22. 22. Flow Control – Islands of Automation RINSER FILLER FILLER RINSER
    23. 23. Islands of Automation – Back Up Detect Sensors Filler Back Up Rinser Back UP FILLER RINSER
    24. 24. Filler Back Up FILLER RINSER Islands of Automation – Hi / Low sensors Filler Low Prime Filler High Prime Rinser Low Prime Rinser High Prime Rinser Back UP
    25. 25. Islands of Automation – Overlapping Islands Rinser Back UP FILLER RINSER Filler Low Prime Filler High Prime
    26. 26. Islands of Automation – Overlapping Islands Filler Low Prime Filler High Prime Rinser Back UP FILLER RINSER Filler Low Prime Filler High Prime
    27. 27. Islands of Automation - Integration Sensors Filler Low Prime Filler High Prime Rinser Back UP FILLER RINSER Filler Low Prime Filler High Prime Integration Sensor Integration Sensor
    28. 28. Flow control. Do you need jam detection?
    29. 29. Flow Control – Back Up / Jam detection Jam Detect Jam Detect Jam Detect Jam Detect Integration High Prime Product Flow
    30. 30. Safety
    31. 31. Safety – One Zone or Two
    32. 32. Safety – One Zone or Two
    33. 33. Flow Control – Tying It All Together
    34. 34. Control Hardware: Save versus Spend <ul><li>Fuses: </li></ul><ul><li>Save initial cost </li></ul><ul><li>Provide better circuit protection </li></ul><ul><li>Decrease ARCH Flash </li></ul><ul><li>Use less panel space </li></ul>
    35. 35. Motor Starters: Use when conveyor speeds are below 100 FPM or when soft start is not required. Control Hardware: Motor Control Variable Speed Drives: Use when control requirements are more demanding.
    36. 36. Control Hardware: Motor Control <ul><li>Mid Level Drives: </li></ul><ul><li>15 or more drives, units become more cost effective </li></ul><ul><li>High End Drives: </li></ul><ul><li>For servo control or high-speed indexing </li></ul><ul><li>On-Machine Drives: </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced field wiring, reduced panel space, system expandability </li></ul>
    37. 37. Control Hardware: Servo Motion How to save on PLCs. Don’t over-specify components in the name of uniformity. Which PLC should I use? Define the scope of the project then research features.
    38. 38. Technical Selection.
    39. 39. Technical Selection. Operator Interface
    40. 40. Control Architecture Considerations <ul><li>System Architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Information Requirements </li></ul>Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.
    41. 41. Control Architecture Considerations DECISION MAKERS
    42. 42. How will your new line integrate with your existing equipment? System Architecture: Highly Integrated vrs. Islands of Automation
    43. 43. How will your control networks interact with existing networks? System Architecture: Stand Alone Machine HMI SWITCH COMMUNICATIONS
    44. 44. How will your new machinery interact with existing networks? System Architecture: Facility Integration LEVEL 5 ENTERPRISE BUSINESS LEVEL 3/4 SITE MANU- FACTURING LEVEL 2 SUPERVISORY CONTROL LEVEL 1 PROCESS CONTROL LEVEL 0 DEVICES
    45. 45. System Architecture: Facility Integration LEVEL 1 PROCESS CONTROL LEVEL 0 DEVICES
    46. 46. What level of diagnostics and functionality do you need? Networks: Device Level Armor Starts
    47. 47. Would saving space or wiring time be beneficial? M12 Connectivity Networks: Distributed Control PROPOSED NETWORK ARCHITECTURE DEVICENET ETHERNET/IP
    48. 48. Networks: Distributed Control
    49. 49. Area C – Safety on EtherNet/IP Area B - ControlNet Networks: Distributed Control Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) seamlessly moves the information across a variety of networks 24vdc 509 -BOD Area A - DeviceNet Controller Block I/O
    50. 50. System Architecture: Safety
    51. 51. <ul><li>INFORMATION ENABLED </li></ul><ul><li>Ease of communication between machinery </li></ul><ul><li>Immediate Operator Alert </li></ul><ul><li>Efficient data results </li></ul>System Architecture: Information Enabled
    52. 52. <ul><li>KEYS TO SAFE AND EFFICIENCT PRODUCTIVITY </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure safety devices and systems are flexible. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure your system is information enabled. </li></ul>Networking a Safety Solution
    53. 53. How do you plan to monitor or troubleshoot your new line? Information Requirements: Diagnostics
    54. 54. What type of production management or reporting data do you need? Manufacturing Intelligence Web Enabled Scalable Historian Information Requirements: Reporting
    55. 55. Ethernet/IP is topology neutral for maximum flexibility Topography Flexibility with EtherNet /IP
    56. 56. Past: Supply Machine The Changing Scope of Supply
    57. 57. Past: Supply Machine Present: Integrate to Other Machines The Changing Scope of Supply
    58. 58. Past: Supply Machine Present: Integrate to Other Machines Future: Provide a Complete Line Integration The Changing Scope of Supply
    59. 59. System Focused Machine Focused Value Oriented Technically Oriented The Changing Scope of Supply
    60. 60. <ul><li>VALUE </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Overall Equipment Effectiveness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Energy Usage Control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>R O I </li></ul></ul>The Changing Scope of Supply
    61. 61. Purchase cost vs. Cost of Ownership $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Total Cost of Ownership $$$ Jim Streblow speaking Acquisition $ Operating $ Change $ Equipment <ul><li>Hardware selection </li></ul><ul><li>Environment </li></ul><ul><li>Human Interface </li></ul><ul><li>Diagnostic information </li></ul><ul><li>Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Energy costs </li></ul><ul><li>Upgrades </li></ul><ul><li>Future expansions </li></ul>Software <ul><li>Integration level </li></ul><ul><li>Communications </li></ul><ul><li>Software costs </li></ul><ul><li>License and fees </li></ul><ul><li>Parameter changes </li></ul><ul><li>Future Needs </li></ul>Personnel <ul><li>Start-up costs </li></ul><ul><li>Training costs </li></ul><ul><li>Qualified people </li></ul><ul><li>HMI interface </li></ul><ul><li>Turn-over training </li></ul><ul><li>Level of integration </li></ul>Technology <ul><li>Installation cost </li></ul><ul><li>Integrator support </li></ul><ul><li>Network compatibility </li></ul><ul><li>Production diagnosis </li></ul><ul><li>Production feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Integrator support </li></ul>
    62. 62. Thank you for your time today! www.nercon.com www.rockwellautomation.com Jim Streblow and Mike Weickert Terry Gansen

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