WordPress as a ‘Distributed’
Enterprise CMS
Eric Greenberg
An explosion of web technologies
There’s a new Dean in town
I’m only going to
ask you once to get
those sites
branded.
A consolidation of sorts…
There’s a new CMO in town
We’re going to
create a Center of
Excellence.
Enter the Marketing Technology
Office
Biggest Problem?
A CMS to easily create and maintain N sites
Why not a Commercial CMS?
Why not Drupal?
• Too arcane for our current staffing.
• Not nearly the size of the WP community
• We would again be depen...
Benefits of WordPress
• We all already had WP experience
• It is SEO friendly out of the box
• Many editors are familiar w...
WordPress Technology Stack
• WordPress (for starters)
• WPEngine (host)
• Premium Theme (as a starting point)
• ManageWP (...
Site X
Site Y
Site Z
wp-updates.com
wpengine.com
manageWP.com
Responsive Pro (Premium Theme)
Wharton Child Theme
Wharton P...
Introducing Tabula Rasa
• Our WP Template site
– Contains all plugins with appropriate
Settings
– Core users
– Sample cont...
Critical Plugins
• Akismet (spam)
• Easy Post Types (customize posts)
• Visual Composer (page-level
customizations)
• VC T...
Really Nice Plugins
• Bulk Page Creator
• Admin Menu Editor
• SEO Auto Links (internal linking)
• JSON API
• List Category...
The Downsides
Thank you!
• ericgr@wharton.upenn.edu
• @ericmgreenberg
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Using WordPress as a Distributed, Enterprise-level CMS By Eric Greenberg

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  • FrontPage and Dreamweaver.Mostly vendor created over a period of X years. ~100 sites – each with a different codeDeveloper involvement for every text or image change.7 Years Ago…
  • About 45 sites on Reddot12 on Mura5 or so handmade or proprietaryStill a good amount done in DreamweaverProblems:No one is happy with how difficult RedDot is to use – from an admin point of view it was great, but users hate it.No one is supporting the Mura sites and there is no thought to SEO from the people that run it.No one can even access the hand-coded CMSs and when one started selling Viagra, well…. The vendor had disappeared and we couldn’t close the back door.Some of our sites still look like they were created in 1997 – and they were.
  • This is a new department tasked with creating and maintaining a technology stack that will support the school’s digital marketing endeavors.From a web standpoint this means:Create easy-to-use, fully supported, responsive, and branded sites that are controlled centrally.Figure out a SEO strategy that doesn’t cannibalize each other.Learn from the past: Culture eats Strategy.Time to pick a new CMS…
  • We have only 2 designer/developers and 1 support person who handles tickets and training.We needed to make sure that whatever we picked could be built and supported by only a very small group that also has a lot of other responsibilities.
  • easy to useAble to be centrally controlled, but yet still customizable on a site level.Able to integrate with the other platforms we are rolling out.Able to update all sites at once…or not!Able to be efficiently operated and improved upon by a ridiculously small team.
  • We looked at several and even received training in Terminal Four – who are a great group of people, by the way.Project execution time: how long to produce the first site and then follow up sites?Learning Curve of yet another platform.Dependent on company or smaller group of vendors for dev work.At this point, WordPress was working!
  • Sites:Businessradio.wharton.upenn.eduExecutivemba.wpengine.com
  • Can’t set plugin settings from a central locationCan’t easily move users between sitesNo graceful integration with Wharton’s SSO environment.
  • Using WordPress as a Distributed, Enterprise-level CMS By Eric Greenberg

    1. 1. WordPress as a ‘Distributed’ Enterprise CMS Eric Greenberg
    2. 2. An explosion of web technologies
    3. 3. There’s a new Dean in town I’m only going to ask you once to get those sites branded.
    4. 4. A consolidation of sorts…
    5. 5. There’s a new CMO in town We’re going to create a Center of Excellence.
    6. 6. Enter the Marketing Technology Office
    7. 7. Biggest Problem?
    8. 8. A CMS to easily create and maintain N sites
    9. 9. Why not a Commercial CMS?
    10. 10. Why not Drupal? • Too arcane for our current staffing. • Not nearly the size of the WP community • We would again be dependent on outside vendors for our projects and platform.
    11. 11. Benefits of WordPress • We all already had WP experience • It is SEO friendly out of the box • Many editors are familiar with it • HUGE community with lots of plugins available • It is 20% of the internet • It is actively developed • Pretty easy to extend – even for non-php devs.
    12. 12. WordPress Technology Stack • WordPress (for starters) • WPEngine (host) • Premium Theme (as a starting point) • ManageWP (for bulk management) • Wp-updates.com (holds our updates) • Mission Critical Plugins
    13. 13. Site X Site Y Site Z wp-updates.com wpengine.com manageWP.com Responsive Pro (Premium Theme) Wharton Child Theme Wharton Parent Theme
    14. 14. Introducing Tabula Rasa • Our WP Template site – Contains all plugins with appropriate Settings – Core users – Sample content – Sample Menu – Empty Wharton Child theme activated
    15. 15. Critical Plugins • Akismet (spam) • Easy Post Types (customize posts) • Visual Composer (page-level customizations) • VC Templates (Reusable content) • Capability Manager Extended (roles) • Wordpress SEO
    16. 16. Really Nice Plugins • Bulk Page Creator • Admin Menu Editor • SEO Auto Links (internal linking) • JSON API • List Category Posts
    17. 17. The Downsides
    18. 18. Thank you! • ericgr@wharton.upenn.edu • @ericmgreenberg

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