Dynamic EEG Mappingas Artistic Experience
Dr Jason Zagami  Griffith University    www.zagami.info
“measured by his ability to foster theattitude of the artist in those whostudy with him”                                 D...
“Art is a method of experiencing themaking of a thing, but what is made isof no importance in art”                        ...
Art exists “not in objects, but in a way of seeing”                                 Weschler 1982
“Learning the words to a song and singing italong with a recording is not necessarily moreartistic than arranging leaves o...
1. attention to form and qualities2. connections to feelings, memories and   personal experiences3. a sense of wholeness o...
“only those few teachers who have artisticbackgrounds... having a realistic set ofschemas and paradigms for teaching the a...
1:38
1:38
(N=159) comprised students (ages 18 - 37,with a mean of 23) studying to become primaryteachers at an Australian university...
1. motivation: sense of importance of the arts in   the curriculum and awareness of student needs2. concerns: personal, ta...
Dr Jason Zagami  Griffith University    www.zagami.info
Dynamic eeg mapping as artistic experience cw11
Dynamic eeg mapping as artistic experience cw11
Dynamic eeg mapping as artistic experience cw11
Dynamic eeg mapping as artistic experience cw11
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Dynamic eeg mapping as artistic experience cw11

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Presentation made at Create World 2011 by Dr Jason Zagami 29 November 2011

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  • Dynamic eeg mapping as artistic experience cw11

    1. 1. Dynamic EEG Mappingas Artistic Experience
    2. 2. Dr Jason Zagami Griffith University www.zagami.info
    3. 3. “measured by his ability to foster theattitude of the artist in those whostudy with him” Dewey, 1958
    4. 4. “Art is a method of experiencing themaking of a thing, but what is made isof no importance in art” Vygotsky 1971
    5. 5. Art exists “not in objects, but in a way of seeing” Weschler 1982
    6. 6. “Learning the words to a song and singing italong with a recording is not necessarily moreartistic than arranging leaves on a paper for ascience experiment” Oreck, 2006
    7. 7. 1. attention to form and qualities2. connections to feelings, memories and personal experiences3. a sense of wholeness or completeness of experience4. the ability to use multiple forms of expression5. the transformation of a symbolic object or objects
    8. 8. “only those few teachers who have artisticbackgrounds... having a realistic set ofschemas and paradigms for teaching the arts” Stake, Bresler & Mabry, 1991
    9. 9. 1:38
    10. 10. 1:38
    11. 11. (N=159) comprised students (ages 18 - 37,with a mean of 23) studying to become primaryteachers at an Australian university. Theirattitude to arts education was surveyed pre-post using the Teaching With the Arts Survey(TWAS)
    12. 12. 1. motivation: sense of importance of the arts in the curriculum and awareness of student needs2. concerns: personal, task, and impact3. self-efficacy: confidence in facilitating arts activities4. self-image: sense of self as creative and artistic individual5. support: sense of autonomy and support from systems for creativity and innovation.
    13. 13. Dr Jason Zagami Griffith University www.zagami.info

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