Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Biodiversity and the High Seas – 
What’s asked for and what’s needed 
Jake Rice 
Canada
Three main avenues for 
creating/expressing needs 
• UNGA itself 
– Resolutions to be enacted by other Agencies 
– Resolut...
“Conservation and sustainable use of 
biodiversity” plays out as the intersections of 
ecosystem features and human uses 
...
Commonalities among them 
• For ALL of them, their ultimate mandate and 
priorities come from UNGA 
• Goals of the regulat...
Rest of presentation: 
• What are some of the key players trying to 
achieve? 
• What support do they need to succeed? 
• ...
CBD (conservation) - Goals 
• Identify areas and features of the sea that are 
ecologically and biologically significant 
...
CBD – Information Needs 
• Application of EBSA criteria 
– Geo-referenced information on species and habitats that are 
fo...
FAO (Management) - Goals 
• Allow fisheries to contribute to economic and social 
prosperity and food security 
– Identify...
FAO Information needs 
• Sustainable Fishing Opportunities 
– Better knowledge of what harvest levels are 
sustainable – p...
UNGA Regular Process - Goals 
• Policy relevant assessments that integrate 
ecological, economic, and social information, ...
Regular Process 
Information Needs 
• Ecological, economic, and social data sets that have 
some inter-operability and spa...
These have a LOT in common 
CBD FAO Regular 
Process 
Geo-referenced 
x x x 
ecological data Information on 
x x x 
places...
These have a LOT in common 
CBD FAO Regular 
Process 
Best practices 
(X) x User 
-science steps Best practices 
(X) x Use...
Greater Generality 
• Points about FAO apply to other IGOs with 
regulatory or oversight roles: IMO, ISA etc 
• Points abo...
Conclusions 
• Every issue can have “regulatory” agency AND 
conservation agency engagement 
• Information needs AND “best...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Biodiversity and the High Seas – What’s Asked for and What’s Needed (Rice)

Presentation given by Jake Rice from Canada, during the GEF/FAO Discussion Meeting on Marine Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ) on 19 November 2010.

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Biodiversity and the High Seas – What’s Asked for and What’s Needed (Rice)

  1. 1. Biodiversity and the High Seas – What’s asked for and what’s needed Jake Rice Canada
  2. 2. Three main avenues for creating/expressing needs • UNGA itself – Resolutions to be enacted by other Agencies – Resolutions to be enacted by itself (Parties) • Regulatory / “Oversight” Agencies – Increase sustainability of biodiversity consequences of industries they advise or manage – FAO & RFMOs, IMO, ISA etc • Conservation Agencies – Increase protection / reduce threats to marine and coastal biodiversity – CBD, Ramsar, . IUCN, Regional Seas Conventions(?)
  3. 3. “Conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity” plays out as the intersections of ecosystem features and human uses Fishing Shipping Mining (etc) Fish population Reality Reality Reality Food Web links Reality … … Habitat feature Reality … … (etc) Reality
  4. 4. Commonalities among them • For ALL of them, their ultimate mandate and priorities come from UNGA • Goals of the regulatory bodies must be coherent with goals of conservation bodies • Measures adopted by all relevant regulatory bodies must also be coherent for a given ecosystem feature • ALL REQUIRE THE SAME INFORMATION TO USE WITHIN THEIR RESPECTIVE MANDATES
  5. 5. Rest of presentation: • What are some of the key players trying to achieve? • What support do they need to succeed? • What are the commonalities of necessary support? • Where are the best opportunities for investment?
  6. 6. CBD (conservation) - Goals • Identify areas and features of the sea that are ecologically and biologically significant – Apply EBSA criteria globally and regionally • Understand the threats to those areas and features – Include biodiversity in mandatory SEAs and IAs • Identify measures that would offer adequate protection to those areas and features – Enable use of multiple tools including Networks of MPAs to achieve conservation and sust. use
  7. 7. CBD – Information Needs • Application of EBSA criteria – Geo-referenced information on species and habitats that are found in the ocean, and their functional roles – Standards and fora for processes to apply the criteria – A library of the results of expert application of the Criteria to the best available information • Evaluation of threats – Knowledge of direct impacts of human activities on biodiversity features and indirect consequences of direct impacts – Knowledge of expected places and magnitudes of the activities • Provision of adequate management protection – Knowledge of effectiveness of management tools – Wise placement of (spatial) management tools
  8. 8. FAO (Management) - Goals • Allow fisheries to contribute to economic and social prosperity and food security – Identify sustainable fishing opportunities • Ensure fisheries do not cause serious adverse impacts to vulnerable marine ecosystems – Implement the Deep-Sea Fishery Guidelines: • Identify the areas that meet the VME criteria • Identify mitigation measures that provide adequate protection to VMEs • Conduct adequate impact assessments before authorizing fisheries to proceed • Provide sufficient Management, control and surveillance to prevent Serious Adverse Impacts
  9. 9. FAO Information needs • Sustainable Fishing Opportunities – Better knowledge of what harvest levels are sustainable – population sizes and life histories • Implement Deep Sea Fishery Guidelines – Geo-referenced information on species and habitats to which to apply the VME criteria – Identification of “best practices” for the: • scientific evaluation tasks in the Guidelines • management practices called for in the Guidelines • impact assessment and risk assessment methodologies required by the Guidelines • Libraries of information & experience with the Guidelines
  10. 10. UNGA Regular Process - Goals • Policy relevant assessments that integrate ecological, economic, and social information, on global and regional scales, to inform about: – Status and trends (ALL three dimensions) – Opportunities for sustainable development – Needs for greater conservation efforts – Policy gaps – Implementation gaps • The “chapeau” for all the other initiatives
  11. 11. Regular Process Information Needs • Ecological, economic, and social data sets that have some inter-operability and spatial resolution • Regional and sub-regional assessments of status and trends on all three factors • Sharing and pooling of information and assessments across agencies and jurisdictions • Processes for identifying priorities and needs (conservation AND development) at regional and sub-regional scales • Processes for doing the integration across sectors, social – economic – ecological, and from sub-regional to regional and global
  12. 12. These have a LOT in common CBD FAO Regular Process Geo-referenced x x x ecological data Information on x x x places and levels of uses Repositories of outcomes x x x Processes for applying criteria x x use results
  13. 13. These have a LOT in common CBD FAO Regular Process Best practices (X) x User -science steps Best practices (X) x User -management Impact / risk x x x assessments Integrated assessments input input X
  14. 14. Greater Generality • Points about FAO apply to other IGOs with regulatory or oversight roles: IMO, ISA etc • Points about CBD apply to other cons agencies • UNEP and Regional Seas have agendas & role • IOC and other science orgs can contribute a lot • Regular process will built on everyone else’s products and add much value (and coherence?) • UNGA and BBNJ will keep moving the goalposts – This work will influence type and pace of change,
  15. 15. Conclusions • Every issue can have “regulatory” agency AND conservation agency engagement • Information needs AND “best practice” standards overlap greatly • Requirement for coherence and efficiency both argue for shared initiatives • Regular process may provide skeleton, but the “meat” will come from agencies • Roles for NGOs in many parts, especially consolidating information and tools.

×