June 2009 Powerpoint (Original)

861 views

Published on

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

June 2009 Powerpoint (Original)

  1. 1. Raymond School DistrictTeaching and Learning<br />How Do We Know What They Know?<br />
  2. 2. “A Global Vision”<br /><ul><li>Three things Research Tells Us:
  3. 3. No significant learning occurs without significant relationships
  4. 4. Professional development is powerful
  5. 5. Standards are powerful
  6. 6. Teaching to standards
  7. 7. Assessing to Standards</li></ul>2<br />Raymond School District<br />
  8. 8. If we want student achievement to improve, what must we change?<br /><ul><li>The adults’ learning experience-</li></ul>Time to ponder, plan and produce<br /><ul><li>The students’ classroom experience- Instructional Focus
  9. 9. The feedback we give students- Assessment Focus</li></ul>3<br />Raymond School District<br />
  10. 10. Instructional Focus<br /> In schools showing marked improvement in low-performing student achievement, providing constructivist learning opportunities was the onlymitigating factor.<br />Duane Baker, 2003<br />4<br />Raymond School District<br />
  11. 11. What Supports Instructional Focus?<br /><ul><li>Clear learning standards
  12. 12. Explicit teaching of standards
  13. 13. Transparent reporting of standards-based achievement
  14. 14. System designed to measure student growth, not sort</li></ul>5<br />Raymond School District<br />
  15. 15. Why clear standards?<br />6<br />Raymond School District<br />
  16. 16. Who’s clear about the goal?<br />7<br />Raymond School District<br />
  17. 17. Assessment<br />“All of these studies show that innovations which include strengthening the practice of formative assessment produce significant, and often substantial, learning gains.”—Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam<br />8<br />Raymond School District<br />
  18. 18. What Supports Good Assessment?<br /><ul><li>Standards-based Assessment
  19. 19. Development of assessment tasks
  20. 20. Data analysis training
  21. 21. Coordinated assessment (classroom, school, state)</li></ul>9<br />Raymond School District<br />
  22. 22. Standards and Grades<br />10<br />Raymond School District<br />
  23. 23. Standards and Grades<br />What does a grade represent?<br />11<br />Raymond School District<br />
  24. 24. Standards and Grades<br />Why do we grade?<br />12<br />Raymond School District<br />
  25. 25. What’s in a grade?<br />13<br />Raymond School District<br />
  26. 26. What’s in a grade?<br />14<br />Raymond School District<br />
  27. 27. What’s in a grade?<br />15<br />Raymond School District<br />
  28. 28. What’s in a grade?<br />16<br />Raymond School District<br />
  29. 29. Reasons We Grade<br /><ul><li>Feedback about student achievement
  30. 30. Guidance of students
  31. 31. Instructional planning
  32. 32. Motivation
  33. 33. Administrative purposes (rank, credits, GPA)</li></ul>17<br />Raymond School District<br />
  34. 34. What’s in a grade?<br />18<br />Raymond School District<br />
  35. 35. What’s in a grade?<br />19<br />Raymond School District<br />
  36. 36. What’s in a grade?<br />20<br />Raymond School District<br />
  37. 37. What Can We See?<br /><ul><li>Four weeks of 76-minute classes
  38. 38. Six marks >=90%, two in high 80s, none lower than 62.5%
  39. 39. Grade awarded was 68.1%
  40. 40. Without a “0”, the grade would be 81.6%</li></ul>21<br />Raymond School District<br />
  41. 41. Did you ever feel like this?<br /> “A grade is an inadequate report of an inaccurate judgment by a biased and variable judge of the extent to which a student has attained an undefined level of mastery of an unknown proportion of an indefinite amount of material.”—Paul Dressel<br />22<br />Raymond School District<br />
  42. 42. Packing a Parachute<br />23<br />Raymond School District<br />
  43. 43. Discussion questions for the parachute packing case<br />Which student will you choose to pick your parachute? Why?<br />If these were scores in a typical teacher’s grade book, which students would pass? Which students would fail?<br />Is there any discrepancy between your answers to questions 1 and 2? If so, why does this discrepancy occur?<br />What are the implications of this for the way you calculate student grades?<br />24<br />Raymond School District<br />
  44. 44. Does it matter in Raymond?<br />25<br />Raymond School District<br />
  45. 45. Perspectives on Grading<br /><ul><li>Grading is not essential to learning
  46. 46. Grading is complicated
  47. 47. Grading is subjective and emotional
  48. 48. Grading is inescapable
  49. 49. Grading has a limited research base
  50. 50. Grading has no single best practice
  51. 51. Grading that is faulty damages students and teachers</li></ul>26<br />Raymond School District<br />
  52. 52. Standards-based Guidelines<br /><ul><li>Relate grading procedures to the standards and other learning goals
  53. 53. Use criterion-referenced performance standards as reference points to determine grades
  54. 54. Limit the valued attributes included in grades to individual achievement
  55. 55. Sample student performance—do not included all scores in grades
  56. 56. Grade in “pencil”, so records can be updated easily
  57. 57. Crunch numbers carefully
  58. 58. Use quality assessments and properly recorded evidence of achievement
  59. 59. Discuss and involve students in assessment, including grading, throughout the teaching/learning process</li></ul>27<br />Raymond School District<br />

×