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Pres 112 michael depew_leonamitchell feb 10 2016

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Pres 112 michael depew_leonamitchell feb 10 2016

  1. 1. Pipelines & Pathways into the Information Professions Lessons Learned from the iSchool inclusion Institute (i3) February 10, 2016 Michael Depew | Director, iSchool Inclusion Institute (i3) | University of Pittsburgh School of Information Sciences | mdepew@pitt.edu Leona Mitchell | Visiting Professor of Practice | University of Pittsburgh School of Information Sciences | leonam@pitt.edu i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  2. 2. The Talent/Skills Gap WHAT WE HAVE  50.8% of U.S. residents are female (Census)  37.9% of U.S. residents are minorities (Time)  -12% drop, since 1991, in the number of computer science degrees earned by women in the U.S. (Wired)  Black and Hispanic students took home 4.1% and 7.7% of bachelor’s degrees in computing and engineering; double the average number hired by the biggest tech firms (Wash. Post)  84% of professionals in U.S. science and engineering jobs are white or Asian males (NSF) WHAT WE NEED  8.65M – U.S. STEM workforce by 2018 (BLS)  34% increase in yearly production of undergraduate STEM degrees to match the demand forecast for STEM professionals (BLS)  35% of 38,000 worldwide employers reported difficulty filling jobs due to lack of available talent  39% of U.S. employers (HBR)  500,000 tech jobs sit open in the U.S. (Wired) i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  3. 3. Industry and government respond…
  4. 4. Pipelines vs.Pathways PIPELINES  Traditional approach of recruiting and developing talent  Primary focus on increasing pool of candidates  Suffers from points of high attrition  Does not account for structural barriers  Ex: promotion and review processes, family barriers, lack of formal mentoring and professional development programs, schedule inflexibility PATHWAYS  Creates options and flexible models for advancement  T-focused and interdisciplinary approach  Casts a wider net and recruits from a richer pool of resources  Recognizes and accounts for variety in student backgrounds and skills  Accounts for structural barriers  Proven results i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  5. 5. iSchool Inclusion Institute (i3) i3 is an undergraduate research and leadership development program that prepares students from underrepresented populations for graduate study and careers in the information sciences i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  6. 6. Objectives 1. Build awareness of the breadth and depth of opportunities for careers in the information sciences 2. Gain hands-on research experience and strengthen discipline-based skills and multi- disciplinary communications skills (T-shape) 3. Develop a network of mentors who encourage and assist i3 Scholars throughout their studies and careers 4. Develop a sense of community among i3 Scholars that sustains itself beyond the program 5. Collaborate with industry partners to expand available pathways for underrepresented students to enter academic, research, and professional careers in the information sciences i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  7. 7. Program Structure i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g Introductory Institute 4 Weeks, Summer 1, Hosted at Pitt  Special-topics workshops; professional development seminars  PhDTeaching Fellows lead modules on research design and programming  Form project teams and create research proposals Team Research Project Yearlong Project, Completed Remotely  Interdisciplinary projects  Gain experience with project management processes and software Concluding Institute 2 Weeks, Summer 2, Hosted at Pitt  Create a research poster and present findings  Prepare work for conference publication
  8. 8. i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g Female 58% Male 42% Gender Asian 9% Black 50% Hispanic/Latino 26% Middle Eastern 2% White 13% Race & Ethnicity Gender & Race/Ethnicity (Cohorts 1-5)
  9. 9. i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g 34 21 18 13 10 9 3 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Information & Computer Sciences Social Sciences Business & Economics Engineering Communications Liberal Arts Natural Sciences Mathematics & Statistics Undergraduate Majors by Discipline (Cohorts 1-5) i3 Scholars are interested in solving information and technology problems … and they approach those problems from unique perspectives 18 2 2 1 1 1 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Information Science Game Design Public Policy Education Criminal Justice Business & Economics Graduate Degrees by Discipline (Cohorts 1-5) The breadth of the information sciences matches students’ desire for interdisciplinary research and careers
  10. 10. Current Obstacles for Students Entry into Graduate Study  Student loans, undergraduate debt  Limited access to, and experience applying for, financial resources  Lack of mentors with graduate study experience  Uninformed or unsupportive social networks (family and friends) Retention in Graduate Study & Professional Careers  Perceived consequences of being underrepresented  Exclusion and conflict with faculty, peers, or supervisors; explicit discrimination  Lack of community within one’s program or department  Family and work-life barriers  Lack of formal mentoring and professional development i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  11. 11. i3:Expanding Pathways & Improving Retention 1. Partner with iSchools to offer scholarships 2. Create a network of academic and professional mentors 3. Increasing the pool instead of shifting  5 minority faculty recruited to University of Florida from Clemson 4. Recruiting non-STEM majors  74 % of those with a bachelor's degree in STEM are not employed in STEM occupations (U.S. Census Bureau) 5. Provide opportunities for culturally-relevant and interdisciplinary projects  Contextualized computing education 6. Partner with industry leaders to develop career pathways i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  12. 12. Program Successes  110 students have participated in i3 since 2011  Diverse  Interdisciplinary  Advanced Education  6 iSchool partners offer scholarships for graduate school  Carnegie Mellon University  Drexel University  Syracuse University  University of Michigan  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill  University of Pittsburgh  16 research projects presented at conferences  Qualitative and quantitative methods  Social media data analysis, sentiment analysis  User studies  Systems analysis  Social informatics  Winner of the 2015 University of Pittsburgh Chancellor’s Affirmative Action, Diversity, and Inclusion Award i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  13. 13. Where i3 Scholars Complete Their Graduate Degrees Drexel University, Masterof Library and Information Science New York University, Master of Fine Arts in Game Design Rutgers University, PhD in Communication Texas State University, Master of Merchandising and Consumer Studies University of Arizona, Master of Library & Information Science University of California at Berkeley, Master of Information Management and Systems University of California at Irvine, PhD in Informatics & Computer Science University of Illinois, Master of Library Information Science University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Master of Public Policy University of Michigan, Master of Science in Information University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Master of Library and Information Science University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Master of Library and Information Science University of Pittsburgh, Master of Information Science University of Southern California, Master of Educational Counseling University of Southern California, Master of Interactive Media and Games University of Texas at Austin, Master of Information Studies University of Washington, Master of Library and Information Science Washington State University, Master of Criminal Justice and Criminology Syracuse University, Master of Information Management i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  14. 14. Current Projects Virtual Patient Computer Simulations Virtual patients are computer simulations of clinical encounters where the learner plays the role of a healthcare provider by interacting with an on-screen patient. The team is implementing Bayesian networks using medical data to drive agent behavior within the second iteration of design of a virtual patient simulator. The Role of Cognitive Maps in Familiarity and Wayfinding The team is investigating familiarity in terms of cognitive maps. By exploring the formation of a cognitive map over time, the team will examine the relationship between cognition, familiarity, and wayfinding success. Immigrant and Refugee Integration Through Online Communities The team is examining how immigrants and refugees can increase their sense of belonging in new communities through the use of information systems, especially neighborhood-based hyper-local online communities such as EveryBlock, Front Porch Forum, and NextDoor. Social Media Consumption & Health Information Seeking Behavior The team is investigating how teens’ usage of social media has impacted their information seeking behavior in regards to safe sex. Mobile Application Use in Social Activist Organizations The team is investigating information needs of social activist groups, specifically Ban the Box / Fair Chance. Analysis of information networks and organization needs will be utilized in the design of a mobile application prototype. i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  15. 15. Help Needed  Engage i3 alumni in research projects or internships  Present a workshop highlighting company research at i3 2016 (June/July 2016)  Sponsor a research project(s) for the 2016 cohort (June 2016 – June 2017)  Mentor a student  Other suggestions? Contact: Mike Depew (mdepew@pitt.edu) i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  16. 16. i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  17. 17. References Bessen, James. (2014). “Employers Aren’t Just Whining – the “Skills Gap” Is Real.” Harvard Business Review. https://hbr.org/2014/08/employers-arent-just-whining- the-skills-gap-is-real/ “Census Bureau Reports Majority of STEM College Graduates Do Not Work in STEM Occupations.” (2014). U.S. Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2014/cb14-130.html “Deloitte Millennial Survey 2016: Winning over the next generation of leaders.” (2016). Deloitte. http://www2.deloitte.com/global/en/pages/about- deloitte/articles/millennialsurvey.html Figueroa, Tanya and Hurtado, Sylvia. (2013). “Underrepresented Racial and/or Ethnic Minority (URM) Graduate Students in STEM Disciplines: A Critical Approach to Understanding Graduate School Experiences and Obstacles to Degree Progression.” Association for the Study of Higher Education. http://www.heri.ucla.edu/nih/downloads/ASHE2013-URM-Grad-Students-in-STEM.pdf Guzdial, Mark. “Contextualized Computing Education Increasing Retention by Making Computing Relevant.” http://coweb.cc.gatech.edu/mediaComp- plan/uploads/1/Contextualized-Computing-Education.pdf Kang, Cecilia and Frankel, Todd C. (2015). “Silicon Valley struggles to hack its diversity problem.” Washington Post. https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/silicon-valley-struggles-to-hack-its-diversity-problem/2015/07/16/0b0144be-2053-11e5-84d5- eb37ee8eaa61_story.html Lapowsky, Issie. (2015). “Obama Has a $100M Plan to Fill the Tech Talent Shortage.” Wired. http://www.wired.com/2015/03/techhire-initiative/ National Science Board. (2015). “Revisiting the STEM Workforce: A Companion to Science and Engineering Indicators 2014.” National Science Foundation. http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsb201510/nsb201510.pdf Ouimet, Maeghan. (2015). “5 Numbers That Explain Why STEM Diversity Matters to All of Us. Wired. http://www.wired.com/brandlab/2015/05/5-numbers-explain- stem-diversity-matters-us/ Pepitone, Julianne. “How diverse is Silicon Valley?” CNN Money. http://money.cnn.com/interactive/technology/tech-diversity-data/?iid=EL “STEM crisis or STEM surplus? Yes and yes.” (2015). Bureau of Labor Statistics: Monthly Labor Review. http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2015/article/stem-crisis-or-stem- surplus-yes-and-yes.htm Sanburn, Josh. (2015). “U.S. Steps Closer to a Future Where Minorities Are the Majority.” TIME. http://time.com/3934092/us-population-diversity-census/ Watson, Jamal. (2014). “University of Florida Takes Giant Step Onto Center Stage.” Diverse Issues in Higher Education. http://diverseeducation.com/article/63916/ White, Judith S. (2005). “Pipeline to Pathways: New Directions for Improving the Status of Women on Campus.” Liberal Education. https://www.aacu.org/publications- research/periodicals/pipeline-pathways-new-directions-improving-status-women-campus i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  18. 18. i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g Background
  19. 19. Former Projects Crowdfunding: Applying Collective Indexing of Emotions to Campaign Videos| To be presented at CSCW 2016 The Customer Is Always Right: Analyzing Existing Market Feedback to Improve TVs | To be presented at iConference 2016 Effects of Social Networking Sites on User Experience | http://hdl.handle.net/2142/73702 Entering the Boys' Club: An Analysis of Female Representation in Game Industry, Culture, and Design | http://hdl.handle.net/2142/47355 Hacked: A Qualitative Analysis of Media Coverage of the Sony Breach | To be presented at iConference 2016 iDiscover: Inspiring youth to pursue STEM | http://hdl.handle.net/2142/41282 iGo Green: A Life Cycle Assessment of Apple's iPhone | http://hdl.handle.net/2142/73760 Information Occupation: Using Information Science to Explore Occupy Wall Street | http://hdl.handle.net/2142/42045 The Path from New to Viral: Understanding What Makes Videos Go Viral | http://hdl.handle.net/2142/47367 "Our Experiences Are Not Unique": An Exploratory Study of Common Motivators and Inhibitors For Latinas in STEM Fields. | http://hdl.handle.net/2142/73733 #ReproHealth: A State-Based Investigation of Reproductive Health Rights Policy and Social Media Activity | To be presented at iConference 2016 Sex Offenders and Interoperability in E-Government: A qualitative analysis of SORNA compliance in Florida and Texas | To be presented at iConference 2016 Social Network Identity: Facebook, Twitter and Identity Negotiation Theory | http://hdl.handle.net/2142/47365 Tweet for Democracy: Examining the Monitorial Citizen | ttp://hdl.handle.net/2142/47334 Utilizing Social Networks to Analyze Needs of Caregivers of Autistic Individuals | http://hdl.handle.net/2142/73693 i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  20. 20. Oliver Haimson (i3 2011) UC Irvine,PhD Student in Informatics Carnegie Mellon University,BS in Economics i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g Information Occupation: Using Information Science to Explore Occupy Wall Street Global social movements of 2011 like the Arab Spring and Occupy Wall Street were unprecedented in their use of social media as an organizing tool and communication technique. To further explore the role of mobile/social technologies in these movements, we analyze information diffusion in Occupy Wall Street by means of social media over a nine-month period beginning in September 2011 as well as describe the movement’s information ecosystem. Specifically, we perform a network visualization and analysis of Twitter data sets and analyze Twitter volume over time to understand OWS’ information practices. Multi-site, participant observation is utilized to observe these information practices. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/42045 “Before i3 I did not really know what information science was or what opportunities were available for graduate school and careers. i3 educated me […] and helped me to realize my passion for IS. i3 is the reason that I am pursuing a PhD in Information and Computer Sciences.”
  21. 21. Oliver Haimson (projects cont.) UC Irvine,PhD Student in Informatics Carnegie Mellon University,BS in Economics DDF Seeks Same: Sexual Health-Related Language in Online Personal Ads For Men Who Have Sex With Men OL Haimson, JR Brubaker, GR Hayes ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2014, 1615-1624 Disclosure, Stress, and Support During Gender Transition on Facebook OL Haimson, JR Brubaker, L Dombrowski, GR Hayes ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing 2015 Using Depression Analytics to Reduce Stigma via Social Media: BlueFriends OL Haimson, KE Ringland, S Simpson, CT Wolf iConference 2014 Information Occupation: Using Information Science to Explore Occupy Wall Street OL Haimson, J Cartagena iConference 2013, 733-737 Evaluating a Collaborative iPad Game's Impact on Social Relationships for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder LE Boyd, KE Ringland, OL Haimson, H Fernandez, M Bistarkey, ... ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing (TACCESS) 7 (1), 3 Between the Lines: Reevaluating the Online/Offline Binary S Vieweg, OL Haimson, M Massimi, K O'Hara, EF Churchill Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human ... Facebooking in Face: Complex Identities Meet Simple Databases MJ Handel, R Bivens, JR Brubaker, OL Haimson, J Lingel, S Yarosh Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference Companion on Computer Supported ... On Vintage Values: The Experience of Secondhand Fashion Reacquisition AE Bowser, OL Haimson, E Melcer, EF Churchill ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2015 Online inspiration and exploration for identity reinvention OL Haimson, A Bowser, E Melcer, EF Churchill ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2015 Exploring Gender, Race, and Sexuality with Social Media Data OL Haimson, A Menking, J Eschler, I Erickson, GR Hayes iConference 2015 User Response to Facebook’s Custom Gender Options OL Haimson, JR Brubaker, C Loder, L Dombrowski, GR Hayes iConference 2015 i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g
  22. 22. Amana Kaskazi (i3 2012) Rutgers University,PhD Student in Communications University of Michigan,MS in Information i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g Social Network Identity: Facebook, Twitter and Identity Negotiation Theory The use of social networking sites (SNS) has had implications in traditional areas of communication such as identity and relationship construction. This study explores how identity is expressed on Facebook and Twitter, the top two most trafficked SNS (Brenner, 2013). Specifically, this study reports the finding of a survey of young adults who use these sites. Respondents were asked questions about what prompts them to choose how they express their identity on Facebook and how/if it differs from identity expression using Twitter. In addition this study examines how Facebook and Twitter can be understood through the sociological theory of identity negotiation. Implications for the connection between social digital identity and "catfishing" are provided and discussed. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/47365 “i3 was a wonderful opportunity that allowed me to expand my horizons and explore new areas of research.”
  23. 23. Amana Kaskazi (project cont.) Rutgers University,PhD Student in Communications University of Michigan,MS in Information i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g 19th Century Acts Digital humanities project designed to create a visually interesting and interactive screen that tracks the life, travels, performances, cultural context and repertory of the 19th century actor Ira Aldridge; display includes geo-spatial mapping of Aldridge’s journeys, images of historical documents, network schemata, and video recordings of gestures that document 19th century acts http://19thcenturyacts.com/index.html Visualizing 19th Century Acts: Informatics, Design, Theatre and History Collaborate Panel Presentation at the 2014 Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru) National Conference. November 5-8, 2014 Organizational Communication Analysis of the University of Michigan Library Contextual inquiry analysis of the University of Michigan Library that identified strengths and weaknesses of organizational communication; conducted interviews and observations of various employees and presented findings in a technical report to the operational manager of the library ‘With Class’: Exploring Black Female Identity and Cultural Expression on Twitter and Instagram Workshop Presentation at the 2015 iConference, Exploring Gender, Race, and Sexuality with Social Media Data session. March 24- 27, 2015
  24. 24. Jamar Smith (i3 2012) Syracuse University,MS in Information Management University of New Mexico,BS in Statistics i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g Tweet for Democracy: Examining the Monitorial Citizen In the 2012 US presidential election, there was concern about voter turnout. Since Obama for America's use of social media during 2008 Presidential elections, there has been growing speculation of social media becoming a medium for re-engaging citizens in politics. Hence, social media's role in political engagement and the nature of political engagement were examined via three analyses of Twitter data (i.e. network posting frequency, sentiment analysis, and social network analysis) and one survey study. The results showed that Twitter's impact on political engagement is simply about spreading awareness -- it still depends on whether open-minded, and politically and civically interested users see the politically relevant tweets. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/47334 “I have a greater understanding of teamwork and I feel more prepared to lead a research project or group. I am also more familiar with technology that can enhance and enable teamwork.”
  25. 25. Mandi Gonzalez (i3 2013) University of Michigan,MS in Information (HCI Concentration) UNC Chapel Hill,BS Library and Information Science i S c h o o l I n c l u s i o n I n s t i t u t e ( i 3 ) | w w w . i s c h o o l - i n c l u s i o n . o r g Entering the Boys' Club: An Analysis of Female Representation in Game Industry, Culture, and Design Numerous studies have examined the role of gender in game design, game play and game experience and conclude that women are often excluded and objectified in character design, appearance and behavior. Game and gender studies scholars encourage further research in these topics. However, in the analysis and critique of these findings, there is little to no emphasis on a plan of implementation or suggestions made concerning a change in the approach of stereotypes used in game and character design, sexism in game culture and inclusion of women in STEM related fields. This paper provides insights into the importance of gender roles and character design and representation in video games in relation to creating inclusive gaming environments for women. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/47355

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