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NTXISSACSC4 - What Should a College Information or Cyber Security Program Contain?

What Should a College Information/Cyber Security Program Contain?

Do you really know what you want to do? Cyber Security sounds like it has a bright future, but does it, is it right for me, do I require a certification, which certification, is college the answer, how am I going to pay for college, what should I look for in a program, or what should I do. These and many more questions that will be raised, discussed, and alternatives will be provided in this presentation.

Many schools offer an Associates, Bachelors, Masters, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees or Certification programs in Cyber or Information Security. Some of these programs are within the Computer Science department or within their Business School. Businesses and Government organizations talk about shortage of qualified candidates to fill security positions.

No one program is perfect, but one should understand the options available that meets a person’s particular interest.

This presentation is meant for anyone just starting out in high school, college, just starting in the work force, or looking to advance their horizons.

The objectives of this presentation are as follows:

• Discuss why you may want a cyber, information, or information technology security career
• Discuss steps to know who you are and apply that to potential security focus areas
• Discuss subjects, topics, items or characteristics that should be offered or included as part of a cyber or information security degree program
• Compare/contrast different programs within the DFW area
• Suggest recommendations or options that one should look at while in a program or when looking at entering a program

Richard (Rick) Brunner has more than 40 years experience in information security and technology, specializing in secure systems/application design and development, system architectures, information risks and controls, testing, and strategy and program management. Rick’s past assignment was as an Assistant Vice President, Security Strategy and Architecture at GM Financial and has worked in Healthcare, Finance, Human Resources, Military, and Intelligence. Rick has 32 years of military service, both active and reserves, rising to the rank of Colonel (0-6). He holds an Executive Jurist Doctorate degree, concentration in Law and Technology from Concord Law School; Master of Science degree in Computer Science, concentration in Information Systems Security from James Madison University; and a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics and Computer Science from University of Texas at San Antonio. Rick is an Assistant Faculty member at Collin College, instructing courses in their cyber security program and is an active member of Collin’s Cyber Security Advisory Board. Rick holds the following certifications:

• Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) (Certification Number: 375658)
• SABSA Chartered Security Architect - Foundation Certificate (SCF) (License SCF14020703)

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NTXISSACSC4 - What Should a College Information or Cyber Security Program Contain?

  1. 1. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 What Should a College Information/Cyber Security Program Contain? Rick Brunner, Col USAF (Retired), EJD, MS, SCF, CISSP, ITIL Enterprise Information/Application Security Architect & Consultant, Adjunct Faculty Robert Half & Collin College 7 October 2016
  2. 2. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Disclaimer The views, thoughts, claims, or opinions in this presentation are solely those of the presenter. Nothing in this presentation represents the views, thoughts, claims, or opinions of Collin College, Robert Half, United States Air Force, the Air Force Reserves, the Department of Defense, the Intelligence Community, or any prior employer.
  3. 3. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Objectives • Discuss why you may want a cyber, information, or information technology security career • Discuss steps to know who you are and apply that to potential security focus areas • Discuss subjects, topics, items or characteristics that should be offered or included as part of a cyber or information security degree program • Compare/contrast different programs within the DFW area • Suggest recommendations or options that one should look at while in a program or when looking at entering a program
  4. 4. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Definitions Term Meaning Source Computer Security Measures and controls that ensure confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the information processed and stored by a computer CNSS 4009 Cyber Security The protection of information assets by addressing threats to information processed, stored, and transported by internetworked information systems ISACA Glossary Information Assurance Measures that protect and defend information and information systems by ensuring their availability, integrity, authentication, confidentiality, and non- repudiation. These measures include providing for restoration of information systems by incorporating protection, detection, and reaction capabilities CNSS 4009 Information Security Ensures that within the enterprise, information is protected against disclosure to unauthorized users (confidentiality), improper modification (integrity), and non-access when required (availability) ISACA Glossary Information Technology Security Is the process of implementing measures and systems designed to securely protect and safeguard information (business and personal data, voice conversations, still images, motion pictures, multimedia presentations, including those not yet conceived) utilizing various forms of technology developed to create, store, use and exchange such information against any unauthorized access, misuse, malfunction, modification, destruction, or improper disclosure, thereby preserving the value, confidentiality, integrity, availability, intended use and its ability to perform their permitted critical functions. SANS
  5. 5. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 100 Best Jobs Title U.S News Ranking Median Income ($) Unemployment Rate (%) Number of Jobs (2014- 2024) Computer Systems Analyst 3 82,710 2.6 118,600 Software Developer 13 95,510 2.5 135,300 Statistician 17 79,990 4.0 10,100 Operations Research Analyst 18 76,660 3.8 27,600 Web Developer 20 63,490 3.4 39,500 IT Manager 29 127,640 1.8 53,700 Information Security Analyst 34 88,890 1.4 14,800 Mathematician 35 103,720 4 700 Database Administrator 48 80,280 2.0 13,400 Computer Support Specialist 60 61,830 3.3 13,600 Computer Systems Administrator 67 75,790 2.0 30,200 Compliance Officer 94 64,950 1.0 8,700 Source: http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/rankings/the-100-best-jobs
  6. 6. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Is a Cyber Security Degree Worth It?
  7. 7. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 The Cybersecurity Workforce Deficit • Global cybersecurity workforce shortfall range from one to two million positions unfilled by 2019 • In 2015, about 209,000 cybersecurity jobs went unfilled in the United States alone Source: Hacking the Skills Shortage--A study of the international shortage in cybersecurity skills, Center for Strategic and International Studies Report, Sponsored: McAfee, Part of Intel Security, 2016
  8. 8. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 “Know thyself.” ― Socrates
  9. 9. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Worth it? What is "it"? Increased knowledge? Almost certainly Increased satisfaction with one's profession? Quite likely Better job opportunities? For many career paths, yes Additional knowledge in other domains? Almost certainly Better opportunities for networking and social connectivity? Possibly Providing a basis for advanced degrees? Almost certainly Reducing initial outlay of funds? Probably not Providing a better basis to pursue your own startup? Not usually https://www.quora.com/Is-a-computer-security-degree-worth-it Author: Gene Spafford
  10. 10. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Worth it? What is "it"? (Continued) Once you define "it" then an answer can be more readily determined • Highly dependent on your own talents, skills, and dedication https://www.quora.com/Is-a-computer-security-degree-worth-it Author: Gene Spafford
  11. 11. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Who Are You • What are your strengths • StrengthsFinder - http://freestrengthstest.workuno.com/ • What did/are you enjoy(ing) the most • What are your hobbies • What are your Goals: • Short (1 to 2 years) • Mid (3 to 5 years) • Long (Anything past 5 years) • What are you passionate about, alternatively, what drives you • What is your personality type • DISC • Myers Briggs • What is your emotional intelligence level • What got you here won’t get you there – Goldsmith
  12. 12. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Match Your Strengths • Find that niche or specialty area • Match strengths and experience with a potential Security domain Strengths Previous Careers Security Focus Areas Inquisitive, Analytical Law enforcement, Military, IT Incident Response, Forensics Attention to detail, Focus Technical writing, Legal Policy and Governance, Privacy Outgoing, Communicator Education, Sales Security Training Professional, Collect input Sales, Marketing Business Security, BCP, Strategy Detail oriented, Problem solver Insurance, risk, tax Risk Assessment, Architect Data driven, Organized Engineering Metrics and Reporting Technical, Structured Clerical, High tech Technology administration Source: Mr. Scott Preston, Vice President, Corporate Information Security, GM Financial
  13. 13. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Source: http://www.cyberdegrees.org/jobs/
  14. 14. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Take Action • Research the Security focus area in detail • Books, podcasts, trade organizations • Incidents in the news, compliance regulations • Use web resources such as http://www.cyberdegrees.org/jobs/ • Show competency • Gain an industry certification • Complete a college course • Complete a college degree • Create a Plan of Action and Milestones
  15. 15. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 15 Where are we now? Where do we want to go? How do we do that ? What do we need to do to get there? What Do You Need to Do Current State Gap Analysis Desired State
  16. 16. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Do You Really Need College Degree • Employers insistence on a bachelor’s degree as a baseline credential for cybersecurity work • Only 23% of respondents say education programs are preparing students to enter the industry • A bachelor’s degree in a technical field is ranked third among most effective ways to acquire cybersecurity skills, behind hands-on experience and professional certifications • A degree is a signal of general competence rather than indicator of relevant cybersecurity skills Source: Hacking the Skills Shortage--A study of the international shortage in cybersecurity skills, Center for Strategic and International Studies Report, Sponsored: McAfee, Part of Intel Security, 2016
  17. 17. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Another View Source: Understaffed and at Risk--Today’s IT Security Department, Independently conducted by Ponemon Institute LLC, Sponsored by HP Enterprise Security Publication Date: February 2014
  18. 18. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Do You Really Need College Degree (Continued) • Average cost of a 4-year degree (tuition, fees, room and board) • State School—$78,000 • Texas Resident—$23,140/year • Texas Nonresident—$32,738/year (http://www.collegeforalltexans.com/apps/collegecosts.cfm?Type=1&Level=1) • Private School—2X State School • Average student loan debt • $37,000/graduate • Not reported for those that did not graduate • Consumer Reports national survey on 1500 student loan borrowers: • 44% left college; cutting back on daily living expenses in order to pay loan • 28% delaying major goals like buying a house • 37% put off saving for retirement • 45% knowing what they know now, their college experience wasn’t worth the cost Source: Having the College Money Talk, Consumer Reports, August 2016
  19. 19. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Alternatives • Professional Certifications & Programs • Non-traditional • 2-Year degrees
  20. 20. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Professional Certifications & Programs • A degree will only take you so far up the job ladder (3rd criteria behind experience and certification) • Professional Security certification is necessary (2nd criteria behind experience ) • They come in all shapes and subjects – from forensics to intrusion to ethical hacking • Regardless of the topic or level: • Can be used across jobs and organizations • Consists of training and a final exam • Must be renewed periodically (every 3 to 4 years) • Need continuing education credits for reaccreditation • They can be expensive and time-consuming • An entry-level credential can take three to nine months to complete and set you back $300-$600 for the exam • They can lead to promotion, better job prospects and/or a raise • SANS survey reported salary increases of up to 5% after accreditation Source: http://www.cyberdegrees.org/resources/certifications/
  21. 21. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 15 Top-Paying Certifications for 2016 Rank Certification Granting Organization Average Salary ($) 1 AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate AWS 125,871 2 Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC) ISACA 122,954 3 Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) ISACA 122,291 4 Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) ISC2 121,923 5 Project Management Professional (PMP®) PMI 116,094 6 Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) ISACA 113,320 7 Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) Routing and Switching Cisco 112,858 8 Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Data Centerr Cisco 107,045 9 Cisco Certified Design Professional (CCDP) Cisco 105,008 10 Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) EC-Council 103,297 11 Six Sigma Green Belt Council of Six Sigma Certification 102,594 12 Citrix Certified Professional - Virtualization (CCP-V) Citrix 102,138 13 Cisco Certified Networking Professional (CCNP) Security Cisco 101,414 14 ITIL® v3 Foundation APM Group Limited 99,868 15 VMware Certified Professional 5 - Data Center Virtualization (VCP5-DCV) VMware 99,334 Source: https://www.globalknowledge.com/us-en/content/articles/top-paying-certifications/
  22. 22. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 How Do You Get Your Foot in the Door (Non- Traditional)? • There is no one true path to working in cyber security • Train in general IT • Many experts suggest that you begin with a job, internship or apprenticeship in IT • Focus your interests • Employers suggest you focus on an area (e.g. networking security) and do it well • Think ahead 5-10 years to your “ultimate security career” • Look for start IT jobs that will supply you with the right skills • Gain practical experience • Gain professional security certification • Use http://www.cyberdegrees.org/resources/transitioning-from- general-it/#starter web site as a resource in your journey Source: http://www.cyberdegrees.org/resources/transitioning-from-general-it/#starter
  23. 23. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 “Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.” ― Socrates
  24. 24. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 What is a Cyber Security Degree • The cybersecurity career field is constantly growing and changing • There are an increasing number of cybersecurity degree programs, and there are also many degree programs that can lead to careers in the cybersecurity field • Many of these degree programs fall within the five traditional sub-disciplines of computing: • Computer Science • Computer Engineering • Information Systems • Information Technology • Software Engineering • Other degree programs that can also lead you there include • Business • Science • Law • Engineering • Criminal Justice • Other degrees Source: https://niccs.us-cert.gov/education/degree-programs
  25. 25. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 How Do You Choose a Program • Look for interdisciplinary degree that includes computer programming, probability and statistics, system architecture, software engineering, secure systems design, ethics, business, communication, technical writing, teamwork, and so forth • Where to begin • 2-Year Programs • 4-Year Programs Source: http://www.cyberdegrees.org/listings/
  26. 26. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 2-Year Program • A technical 2-Year program should include the following core knowledge units (KU): • Basic Data Analysis • Basic Scripting or Introductory Programming • Cyber Defense • Cyber Threats • Fundamental Security Design Principles • Information Assurance Fundamentals • Intro to Cryptography • IT Systems Components • Networking Concepts • Policy, Legal, Ethics, and Compliance • System Administration • Look for courses that give you a lot of hands-on experience with real world problems Source: National NSA/DHS Centers of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance/Cyber Defense Knowledge Units, https://www.iad.gov/NIETP/documents/Requirements/CAE_IA-CD_KU.pdf
  27. 27. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Incorporating Cybersecurity into Existing Curricula (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics [STEM]) • Technical Dual Credit at Collin College • Allen Independent School District (ISD) • Prosper ISD • Frisco ISD • Wylie ISD • Student completes program at Collin • Associate of Applied Science (AAS) • Certification • 4-Year Programs • University of Texas—Dallas (UTD) • University of North Texas (UNT)
  28. 28. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 4-Year Program • Should include all of the 2-Year program KUs and these additional KUs: • Databases • Network Defense • Networking Technology and Protocols • Operating Systems Concepts • Probability and Statistics • Software Engineering • Have advanced classes such as cloud computing, forensic accounting, wireless sensor networks • Look for courses that give you a lot of hands-on experience with real world problems Source: National NSA/DHS Centers of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance/Cyber Defense Knowledge Units, https://www.iad.gov/NIETP/documents/Requirements/CAE_IA-CD_KU.pdf
  29. 29. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 What Else • Have specific criteria for choosing a degree program (cost/geography/commute etc.) • Look for a program that provides best value • Evaluating programs • NSA/DHS Current National Centers of Academic Excellence Designated Institutions • Ponemon Institute Report—2014 Best Schools For Cybersecurity • Use these when you’re deciding between schools Source: http://www.cyberdegrees.org/listings/
  30. 30. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 NSA/DHS Current National Centers of Academic Excellence Designated Institutions In addition to core knowledge units, the NSA/DHS also insists that a program: • Demonstrates outreach and collaboration • Has a center for Information Assurance (IA) / Cyber Defense (CD) education • Fosters a robust and active IA/CD academic program • Ensures IA/CD is a multidisciplinary science within the institution • Supports the practice of IA/CD throughout the institution • Encourages student and faculty IA/CD research Source: http://www.cyberdegrees.org/listings/
  31. 31. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 2014 Best Schools For Cybersecurity (Ponemon Institute Report) Characteristics that set the best schools apart: • Interdisciplinary program that cuts across different, but related fields – especially computer science, engineering and management • Designated by the NSA and DHS as a center of academic excellence in information assurance education • Curriculum addresses both technical and theoretical issues in cybersecurity • Both undergraduate and graduate degree programs are offered • A diverse student body, offering educational opportunities to women and members of the military • Faculty composed of leading practitioners and researchers in the field of cybersecurity and information assurance • Hands-on learning environment where students and faculty work together on projects that address real life cybersecurity threats • Emphasis on career and professional advancement • Courses on management, information security policy and other related topics essential to the effective governance of secure information systems • Graduates of programs are placed in private and public sector positions Source: http://www.cyberdegrees.org/listings/ and http://www.ponemon.org/local/upload/file/2014%20Best%20Schools%20Report%20FINAL%202.pdf
  32. 32. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 2014 Best Schools For Cybersecurity (Ponemon Institute Report) Insistence on interdisciplinary studies • Course work to include management, law, business, ethics, probability and statistics, communications, technical writing, and teamwork* • A strong degree is going to prepare you for issues you’ll be discussing with non-technical colleagues Source: http://www.cyberdegrees.org/listings/ and http://www.ponemon.org/local/upload/file/2014%20Best%20Schools%20Report%20FINAL%202.pdf *Note: probability and statistics, communications, technical writing, and teamwork were added by presenter
  33. 33. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 National Hacking or Capture the Flag Competitions • Provide an effective channel to identify talent and develop cybersecurity skills • Over three in five survey respondents say national hacking competitions play a key role in developing cybersecurity talent • Overall two in five respondents cite hacking competitions as among the most effective way to acquire skills Source: Hacking the Skills Shortage--A study of the international shortage in cybersecurity skills, Center for Strategic and International Studies Report, Sponsored: McAfee, Part of Intel Security, 2016
  34. 34. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition (CCDC) • CCDC Events are designed to: • Build a meaningful mechanism by which institutions of higher education may evaluate their programs • Provide an educational venue in which students are able to apply the theory and practical skills they have learned in their course work • Foster a spirit of teamwork, ethical behavior, and effective communication both within and across teams • Create interest and awareness among participating institutions and students • Competition: • Each team begins the competition with an identical set of hardware and software • Team scored on their ability to detect and respond to outside threats, maintain availability of existing services such as mail servers and web servers, respond to business requests such as the addition or removal of additional services, and balance security needs against business needs • An automated scoring engine is used to verify the functionality and availability of each team’s services on a periodic basis and traffic generators continuously feed simulated user traffic into the competition network • A volunteer red team provides the “external threat” all Internet-based services face and allows the teams to match their defensive skills against live opponents http://www.nationalccdc.org/index.php/competition/about-ccdc/mission
  35. 35. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition(Continued) • Demonstrates: • “TEAM” Work • Technical ability to counter/mitigate/minimize “real” world attacks • Teams understanding in maintaining “Business Services” while under attack • Results • Many participants receive on the spot job offers from business entities while at the competition • Some are in the 6 figure range • Many are in the high 5 figure range
  36. 36. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Additional Presenter’s View Source: http://www.texascisocouncil.org/resources
  37. 37. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Additional Presenter’s View (Continued) • Demonstrated technical writing and communications capabilities • Employed as summer hire or as part of an Internship Program • Perform volunteer work for a Charity • Join InfraGard and local Chapter near your school • Join (if possible): • Information Systems Security Association and a local Chapter near your school • ISACA and a local Chapter near your school
  38. 38. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 “If you pursue a degree and take all the easy courses and blow off some of the assignments, the degree may be worth a lot less than if you pursue a more challenging path. If you live on campus and get involved with some of the clubs and organizations for students your experience will be very different from someone who takes everything online.” Gene Spafford
  39. 39. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 What about a Master’s Degree or Higher? • It depends • Do your homework: • Will the MS give you real technical skills • Have you considered a Master’s in Computer Science or Technology Management with a concentration in Information Security • IT is continually changing – is your MS in Cyber Security going to be a helpful qualification in 10 years • Does gaining a Master’s increase your job opportunities • Can you justify the cost of a degree (e.g. $30k) in terms of ROI? In other words, will it significantly increase your earning power in the future • If the answer to these questions is “no,” you may want to hold off on the investment. Source: http://www.cyberdegrees.org/listings/#Do_I_Need_a_Degree
  40. 40. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Local Schools University of Dallas
  41. 41. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Compare and Contrast School 2-Year 4-Year Technical Dual Credit Certificate Program Associates of Applied Science Bachelors Masters Master of Business Administration PhD DHS/NSA Designated Center of Excellence Collin College X X X X Richland College X X X X University of Texas at Arlington X University of Texas at Dallas X X X X X X X University of North Texas X X X X X X X University of Dallas X X X X X Southern Methodist University X X X X X Western Governors University Texas X X X X
  42. 42. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Conclusions • Information/Cyber Security opportunities abound • Information/Cyber Security is a relatively young field of study • College degree programs vary • Work Experience and Professional Certifications remain more important than a degree in the hiring decision • A recognized college or graduate-level degree program is essential or very important in the hiring decision • Course work to include management, law, business, ethics, probability and statistics, communications, technical writing, and teamwork A College Degree in Information/Cyber Security is worth it, but do your homework
  43. 43. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Recommendations • Define “it” • Know your strengths and weaknesses • Know yourself and where you like/want to go • Do your homework • Look at yourself objectively • Identify actions you need to take in order to move foreword • Are you sure you want a Cybersecurity career
  44. 44. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Recommendations (Continued) • Professional Certification • Current Employer • Veterans • GI Bill • Federal Virtual Training Environment (FedVTE) • Short courses at little to no cost • College and Dual Credit students • Plan on taking certification course/exam while in school • Use ISC2 Associates Program to your advantage • Check other certification organization requirements
  45. 45. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Recommendations (Continued) • College • Read “Having the College Money Talk” article, Consumer Reports, August 2016 • Use the information provided in presentation and further complete “Compare and Contrast” slide in deciding which program is “right” for “you” • Get involved • Clubs, organizations such as ISSA-NTX • “Capture the Flag” exercises • Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition • Can lead to strong employment opportunities with potential lucrative salaries • Ensure interdisciplinary program cuts across different, but related fields – especially computer science, engineering, management, business, ethics, probability and statistics, technical writing, communications • Take the “hard” courses • Use/take part in any internships with local industry and excel • Summer hire programs • Semester programs
  46. 46. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 Recommendations (Continued) • MS, MBA or PhD • Based on you, your needs and wants • Possible Financial Options • The Hazlewood Act - State of Texas • Veterans • GI Bill • Current employer • https://www.cappex.com/ Finding Schools and Scholarships • CyberCorps®: Scholarship for Service (SFS) https://niccs.us- cert.gov/education/cybercorps-scholarship-service-sfs • Has 2,300 graduates since 2000 with a 93% placement rate • Specific School Programs • Talk to people in the field
  47. 47. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 “The more I learn, the more I realize how much I don't know.” ― Albert Einstein
  48. 48. @NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4@NTXISSA #NTXISSACSC4 The Collin College Engineering Department Collin College Student Chapter of the North Texas ISSA North Texas ISSA (Information Systems Security Association) NTX ISSA Cyber Security Conference – October 7-8, 2016 48 Thank you

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What Should a College Information/Cyber Security Program Contain? Do you really know what you want to do? Cyber Security sounds like it has a bright future, but does it, is it right for me, do I require a certification, which certification, is college the answer, how am I going to pay for college, what should I look for in a program, or what should I do. These and many more questions that will be raised, discussed, and alternatives will be provided in this presentation. Many schools offer an Associates, Bachelors, Masters, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees or Certification programs in Cyber or Information Security. Some of these programs are within the Computer Science department or within their Business School. Businesses and Government organizations talk about shortage of qualified candidates to fill security positions. No one program is perfect, but one should understand the options available that meets a person’s particular interest. This presentation is meant for anyone just starting out in high school, college, just starting in the work force, or looking to advance their horizons. The objectives of this presentation are as follows: • Discuss why you may want a cyber, information, or information technology security career • Discuss steps to know who you are and apply that to potential security focus areas • Discuss subjects, topics, items or characteristics that should be offered or included as part of a cyber or information security degree program • Compare/contrast different programs within the DFW area • Suggest recommendations or options that one should look at while in a program or when looking at entering a program Richard (Rick) Brunner has more than 40 years experience in information security and technology, specializing in secure systems/application design and development, system architectures, information risks and controls, testing, and strategy and program management. Rick’s past assignment was as an Assistant Vice President, Security Strategy and Architecture at GM Financial and has worked in Healthcare, Finance, Human Resources, Military, and Intelligence. Rick has 32 years of military service, both active and reserves, rising to the rank of Colonel (0-6). He holds an Executive Jurist Doctorate degree, concentration in Law and Technology from Concord Law School; Master of Science degree in Computer Science, concentration in Information Systems Security from James Madison University; and a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics and Computer Science from University of Texas at San Antonio. Rick is an Assistant Faculty member at Collin College, instructing courses in their cyber security program and is an active member of Collin’s Cyber Security Advisory Board. Rick holds the following certifications: • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) (Certification Number: 375658) • SABSA Chartered Security Architect - Foundation Certificate (SCF) (License SCF14020703)

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