USING MODELS
MODELS <ul><li>Don’t mistake the map for the territory: </li></ul>
MODELS <ul><li>Don’t mistake the map for the territory: </li></ul>
MODELS <ul><li>Don’t mistake the map for the territory: </li></ul>
MODELS <ul><li>This picture shows  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>what your eyes see  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>at a facilitated w...
MODELS <ul><ul><ul><li>What does the eye see?  </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What does the model ‘see’? </li></ul></...
WHAT IS A SOCIOGRAM?   <ul><li>Sociograms show interaction patterns for a group of people </li></ul><ul><li>Each circle re...
PHENOMENOLOGY <ul><li>Behaviourists  model  (make models to explain)  what people  do . </li></ul><ul><li>Behaviourists de...
IS IT REALLY THERE? <ul><li>Two people watch the same video </li></ul><ul><li>One person sees something odd. </li></ul><ul...
IS IT REALLY THERE? <ul><li>Watch the video at: </li></ul><ul><li>http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/39199153/ns/today-books/  ...
MERLEAU PONTY <ul><li>Merleau Ponty’s ‘Phenomenology of Perception’ is difficult (like Sartre). </li></ul><ul><li>What fol...
MERLEAU PONTY <ul><li>In a workshop, as an event unfolds </li></ul><ul><li>We seem to have many possible responses to choo...
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Using models

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Models from psychology can be very useful. They can also be very dangerous.
Don't mistake the map for the territory.

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Using models

  1. 1. USING MODELS
  2. 2. MODELS <ul><li>Don’t mistake the map for the territory: </li></ul>
  3. 3. MODELS <ul><li>Don’t mistake the map for the territory: </li></ul>
  4. 4. MODELS <ul><li>Don’t mistake the map for the territory: </li></ul>
  5. 5. MODELS <ul><li>This picture shows </li></ul><ul><ul><li>what your eyes see </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>at a facilitated workshop </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This sociogram is </li></ul><ul><ul><li>one model (one of many) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>of what happened </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>at the same workshop </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. MODELS <ul><ul><ul><li>What does the eye see? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What does the model ‘see’? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What can the eye not see? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What can the model not see? </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. WHAT IS A SOCIOGRAM? <ul><li>Sociograms show interaction patterns for a group of people </li></ul><ul><li>Each circle represents an individual. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Should you label the circle with their role? or name the individual? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does the seating plan influence how people interact? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Each line represents a ‘speech act’. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The direction of the line indicates who was talking to whom. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. PHENOMENOLOGY <ul><li>Behaviourists model (make models to explain) what people do . </li></ul><ul><li>Behaviourists demand observable evidence </li></ul><ul><li>So behaviourists reject everything but observable behaviour. </li></ul><ul><li>Do different observers see the same actions? </li></ul><ul><li>Can observers see an action without attributing meaning to it? </li></ul><ul><li>Phenomenologists model (make models to explain) what people experience . </li></ul><ul><li>Intentionality = purpose, be it conscious or otherwise </li></ul><ul><li>Embodiment = body structure, skills, affordance </li></ul><ul><li>(e.g. chairs don’t have affordance for flamingos, or in 18 th century Japan) </li></ul><ul><li>Worldliness = a model of the world as previously experienced </li></ul>
  9. 9. IS IT REALLY THERE? <ul><li>Two people watch the same video </li></ul><ul><li>One person sees something odd. </li></ul><ul><li>The other person did not see it. </li></ul><ul><li>Was it there? </li></ul><ul><li>Behaviourists say ‘No’. We must replicate our results. </li></ul><ul><li>Phenomenologists say ‘Yes’. </li></ul><ul><li>We only access reality through our perceptions. </li></ul><ul><li>If one person perceived it, then (in some sense) it was there. </li></ul>
  10. 10. IS IT REALLY THERE? <ul><li>Watch the video at: </li></ul><ul><li>http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/39199153/ns/today-books/ </li></ul><ul><li>Count how many times people in the white tops pass the ball. </li></ul>
  11. 11. MERLEAU PONTY <ul><li>Merleau Ponty’s ‘Phenomenology of Perception’ is difficult (like Sartre). </li></ul><ul><li>What follows is just what Isobel got from it (right or wrong) </li></ul><ul><li>In a workshop, we ‘see’ many different realities: </li></ul><ul><li>A simple exchange of knowledge and expertise </li></ul><ul><li>Genuine attempts to collaborate </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional reactions (empathy, fear, helpfulness, embarrassment …) </li></ul><ul><li>Exercise of power (or resisting power, or desisting from the use of power) </li></ul><ul><li>Hard-nosed negotiation </li></ul>
  12. 12. MERLEAU PONTY <ul><li>In a workshop, as an event unfolds </li></ul><ul><li>We seem to have many possible responses to choose from </li></ul><ul><li>BUT: </li></ul><ul><li>We perceive so many different realities </li></ul><ul><li>Each reality gives a different meaning to the event </li></ul><ul><li>Many realities demand different responses </li></ul><ul><li>Must our response be acceptable to all meanings? </li></ul><ul><li>Does one meaning have priority on this occasion? </li></ul><ul><li>Suddenly it’s full of complexity, subtlety and dilemmas </li></ul><ul><li>Whenever we deal with people, we navigate through all this </li></ul>

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