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Ismoiljonov Shukhrat
Definitions
Adventure travel is a type of tourism, involving
exploration or travel to remote, exotic and possibly
hostile ...
Definitions
Adventure tourism gains much of its excitement by
allowing its participants to step outside of their
comfort z...
Definitions 2
The George Washington University
School of Business, The Adventure Travel Trade
Association, and Xola Consul...
Definition of UNWTO
Adventure tourism can be domestic or international, and like all
travel, it must include an overnight ...
Types of Adventure Tourism
There are two main categories of adventure
activities, hard adventure or soft adventure, and
vi...
Hard Adventure
Hard adventure includes trekking, climbing (mountain, rock
and ice) and caving. These activities are high r...
Soft Adventure
The number of soft adventure departures represents a substantial
percentage of trips worldwide. Interesting...
Orienteering
Orienteering is a family of sports that enquires navigational skills
using a map and compass to navigate from...
Orienteering sports
• Orienteering sports combine significant navigation with a specific method of
travel. Because the met...
The international orienteering flag
An orienteering map
Mountainbikeorienteerwitha
mapboardonbikehandlebars
Rafting
Rafting and white water rafting are recreational outdoor
activities which use an inflatable raft to navigate a riv...
Grades of white water
• Otherwise known as the International Scale of River Difficulty, below are the
six grades of diffic...
Backpacking/Trekking/
Hiking: A Growth Activity
Backpacking, trekking, and hiking are all forms of exploring
destinations ...
Hiking
What is the difference between hiking and
trekking?
• We've often heard the terms hiking and trekking used
interchangeably...
Cycling
Cycling tourism is on the rise across the world, with an increasing
number of adventure tourists embarking on both...
Sailing
Sailing tourism refers to any holiday where the main purpose of the trip is to
sail or learn how to sail. Sailing ...
Kayaking
Diving
Interesting facts about
adventure tourism
Brief History of Adventure Tourism
Humans have been engaging in adventurous
travel for hundreds of years via exploration b...
Brief History of Adventure Tourism
• In the mid-1800s, adventurers began to push
the limits of mountain climbing and river...
Brief History of Adventure Tourism
Today, Adventure Tourism is a vibrant, dynamic,
and fast-changing sector with new varia...
Tourism Different
from Other Types
of Tourism?
Adventure Tourism vs. Other Types of
Responsible Tourism
• The differences between adventure tourism and mass
tourism are ...
• Sustainable Tourism is tourism that takes full
account of its current and future economic, social
and environmental impa...
• Responsible Tourism is tourism “that creates better places
for people to live in, and better places to visit”.19
Respons...
Defining Risk in Adventure
Tourism
Professor Buckley reviews risk in adventure tourism across six
categories:
· Commercial...
Defining Risk in Adventure
Tourism
- Operational: Operational logistics of risk, such as itinerary
details, gear, lodging ...
Adventure tourist trials in persentage
Dziękuję bardzo za uwagę!!!
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Adventure tourism

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Adventure travelis a type of tourism, involving exploration or travel to remote, exotic and possibly hostile areas. Adventure tourism is rapidly growing in popularity, as tourists seek different kinds of vacations. According to the U.S. based Adventure Travel Trade Association, adventure travel may be any tourist activity, including two of the following three components: a physical activity, a cultural exchange or interaction and engagement with nature.

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Adventure tourism

  1. 1. Ismoiljonov Shukhrat
  2. 2. Definitions Adventure travel is a type of tourism, involving exploration or travel to remote, exotic and possibly hostile areas. Adventure tourism is rapidly growing in popularity, as tourists seek different kinds of vacations. According to the U.S. based Adventure Travel Trade Association, adventure travel may be any tourist activity, including two of the following three components: a physical activity, a cultural exchange or interaction and engagement with nature.
  3. 3. Definitions Adventure tourism gains much of its excitement by allowing its participants to step outside of their comfort zone. This may be from experiencing culture shock or through the performance of acts, that require significant effort and involve some degree of risk (real or perceived) and/or physical danger (See extreme sports). This may include activities such as mountaineering, trekking, bungee jumping, mountain biking, rafting, zip- lining, paragliding, and Rock climbing.
  4. 4. Definitions 2 The George Washington University School of Business, The Adventure Travel Trade Association, and Xola Consulting Adventure travelers often seek unique or new travel destinations and activities. It is often believed that a percentage of this sector is willing to accept limited tourism infrastructure with the promise of an exceptional, authentic experience. Given their penchant for exploring new destinations and seeking new experiences, they are frequently coveted by emerging destinations at the early stages of tourism development and also in more mature destinations that have protected and/or developed appropriate product.
  5. 5. Definition of UNWTO Adventure tourism can be domestic or international, and like all travel, it must include an overnight stay, but not last longer than one year. Adventure tourists are passionate and risk-taking. The Adventure Pulse: USAAdventure Traveler Profiles indicates interest in destinations that have previously suffered significant commercial tourism setbacks due to natural and political events, such as Haiti, Rwanda, and Japan. The Adventure Travel Trade Association reports that adventure tourism operators routinely create and offer itineraries in places such as Colombia, North Korea, Iran, Rwanda, and other destinations recovering from environmental and political stress, making these destinations accessible to travelers seeking off-the- beaten path and authentic travel experiences.
  6. 6. Types of Adventure Tourism There are two main categories of adventure activities, hard adventure or soft adventure, and vigorous debate often surrounds which activities belong in each category. The easiest way to identify an adventure trip as hard or soft adventure is by its primary activity.
  7. 7. Hard Adventure Hard adventure includes trekking, climbing (mountain, rock and ice) and caving. These activities are high risk and require a high level of specialized skill. Unsurprisingly, these represented small percentages of the population but still uncovered a sizable market. The trend over the past three years indicates that the number of hard adventure trips has held steady, at around 2% of the population. However, respondents in Latin America and Europe indicated that they intended to take a hard adventure trip for their next vacation. In North America, the trend was opposite, and the percent of people expressing the intention to take a hard adventure vacation dipped slightly.
  8. 8. Soft Adventure The number of soft adventure departures represents a substantial percentage of trips worldwide. Interestingly, compared to North Americans and Europeans, Latin Americans are taking the most adventure trips at 35% of total outbound travelers. On average, 25% of international trips taken from all three regions are soft adventure trips. Soft adventurers are an important market for destinations, gear companies and tour operators. They are more likely to try different activities and destinations than hard adventurers. They are also more likely to respond to targeted marketing. In all three regions — Latin America, North America and Europe — soft adventure increased steadily over the traveler’s past three trips and continued to do so with future travel intentions. Around 43% of Europeans indicated that for.
  9. 9. Orienteering Orienteering is a family of sports that enquires navigational skills using a map and compass to navigate from point to point in diverse and usually unfamiliar terrain, and normally moving at speed. Participants are given a topographical map, usually a specially prepared orienteering map, which they use to find control points. Originally a training exercise in land navigation for military officers, orienteering has developed many variations. Among these, the oldest and the most popular is foot orienteering. For the purposes of this article, foot orienteering serves as a point of departure for discussion of all other variations, but basically any sport that involves racing against a clock and requires navigation using a map is a type of orienteering. Orienteering is included in the programs of world sporting events including the World Games (see Orienteering at the World Games) and World Police and Fire Games.
  10. 10. Orienteering sports • Orienteering sports combine significant navigation with a specific method of travel. Because the method of travel determines the needed equipment and tactics, each sport requires specific rules for competition and guidelines for orienteering event logistics and course design. • Canoe orienteering Car orienteering • Foot orienteering Mountain bike orienteering Mountain marathoning Mounted orienteering • Radio orienteering [including variants Fox Oring and Radio Orienteering in a Compact Area (ROCA)] • Rogaining • Ski-orienteering • SportLabyrinth – micro orienteering • Trail orienteering • Adventure racing is a combination of two or more disciplines, and usually includes orienteering as part of the race.
  11. 11. The international orienteering flag
  12. 12. An orienteering map
  13. 13. Mountainbikeorienteerwitha mapboardonbikehandlebars
  14. 14. Rafting Rafting and white water rafting are recreational outdoor activities which use an inflatable raft to navigate a river or other body of water. This is often done on whitewater or different degrees of rough water, and generally represents a new and challenging environment for participants. Dealing with risk and the need for teamwork is often a part of the experience. The development of this activity as a leisure sport has become popular since the mid-1970s, evolving from individuals paddling 10 feet (3.0 m) rafts with double-bladed paddles to multi-person rafts propelled by single-bladed paddles and steered by a tour guide at the stern. It is considered an extreme sport, and can be fatal. The International Rafting Federation (IRF) is the worldwide body which oversees all aspects of the sport.
  15. 15. Grades of white water • Otherwise known as the International Scale of River Difficulty, below are the six grades of difficulty in white water rafting. They range from simple to very dangerous and potential death or serious injuries. • Grade 1: Very small rough areas, might require slight maneuvering. (Skill level: very basic) Grade 2: Some rough water, maybe some rocks, might require some maneuvering. (Skill level: basic paddling skill) Grade 3: Whitewater, small waves, maybe a small drop, but no considerable danger. May require significant maneuvering. Grade 4: Whitewater, medium waves, maybe rocks, maybe a considerable drop, sharp maneuvers may be needed. Grade 5: Whitewater, large waves, large volume, possibility of large rocks and hazards, possibility of a large drop, requires precise maneuvering. Grade 6: Class 6 rapids are considered to be so dangerous that they are effectively unnavigable on a reliably safe basis.
  16. 16. Backpacking/Trekking/ Hiking: A Growth Activity Backpacking, trekking, and hiking are all forms of exploring destinations on foot, often on a budget. Like cycling, these types of adventure activities are on the rise. The Adventure Pulse: USA Adventure Traveler Profiles confirms that these are the most popular activities for the United States of America adventure travelers. These tourists often stay in their destination longer, thus spending more money, albeit less per day. Their expenditures often penetrate deeply into local and regional economies, helping increase the spread of tourism benefits. The demand for this type of travel in creases year after year, and while some destinations seek to attract these types of tourists, others prefer to focus on higher value clientele.
  17. 17. Hiking
  18. 18. What is the difference between hiking and trekking? • We've often heard the terms hiking and trekking used interchangeably. We all know they're both outdoor recreational activities. But are they really the same? • Hiking is an outdoor activity of walking in beautiful natural environments on pre-charted paths called hiking trails. There are day hikes and overnight hikes. • Trekking is a long journey be undertaken on foot in areas where there are usually no means of transport available. Trekking is not necessarily mountaineering; it is walking for a number of days, usually on uncharted paths, in challenging environments which are likely to be hilly or mountainous.
  19. 19. Cycling Cycling tourism is on the rise across the world, with an increasing number of adventure tourists embarking on both road and mountain biking tours, participating in cycling events such as Ride the Rockies, or spectating events like the Tour de France. According to the European Cyclists Federation,22 cycling brings in over EUR 44 billion annually to the continent, resulting from 2.3 billion cycling trips with a tourism value. There is no region-wide data available for other continents, but positive growth has been charted by several U.S. states. Wisconsin, for example, found that bike tourism generated USD 924 million from in-state and out-of-state visitors
  20. 20. Sailing Sailing tourism refers to any holiday where the main purpose of the trip is to sail or learn how to sail. Sailing tourism has two broad categories, which are defined by the type of boat used: a yacht (which is also used as overnight accommodation) or a dinghy (a smaller boat without berths – therefore overnight accommodation is on land). Yacht sailing holidays tend to be either bareboat charters, where the boat is hired – without crew - and can be sailed to any chosen destination, or flotilla, where all boats in the flotilla follow a pre- planned route. Dinghy sailing holidays are most likely to be combined with a sailing course.
  21. 21. Kayaking
  22. 22. Diving
  23. 23. Interesting facts about adventure tourism
  24. 24. Brief History of Adventure Tourism Humans have been engaging in adventurous travel for hundreds of years via exploration by the likes of Marco Polo, Captain James Cook, and Sir Ernest Shackleton, who had primarily scientific, geographic, or colonial motives. However, commercial adventure travel is a relatively new phenomenon, in which travelers hire a professional guide to provide a range of technical support and equipment, as well as culture and nature interpretation.
  25. 25. Brief History of Adventure Tourism • In the mid-1800s, adventurers began to push the limits of mountain climbing and river rafting, with the first ascent of the Matterhorn in 1865 and descent of the Colorado River in 1869. • In the mid-1950s, many first ascents and descents attracted global attention and inspired many people to attempt their own expeditions. Maurice Herzog’s ascent of Annapurna in 1950, Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzig Norgay’s ascent of Mount Everest, and others’ successes were hailed in the media around the world.
  26. 26. Brief History of Adventure Tourism Today, Adventure Tourism is a vibrant, dynamic, and fast-changing sector with new variants routinely added into the possible experiences. Individual companies are often small, owner- operated businesses led by entrepreneurs with a drive to share their favorite places and passions with others. Adventure offers opportunities to entrepreneurs in rural areas around the world to do the same. 69% of overall international travel departures leave from Europe, North America, and South America, and together these three regions account for over USD 263 billion in adventure travel expenditures.
  27. 27. Tourism Different from Other Types of Tourism?
  28. 28. Adventure Tourism vs. Other Types of Responsible Tourism • The differences between adventure tourism and mass tourism are clear, but the differences between adventure tourism and other types of tourism can be more nuanced. Below are definitions of other popular types of tourism, which share characteristics with adventure tourism, such as minimizing negative impacts and increasing local benefits:
  29. 29. • Sustainable Tourism is tourism that takes full account of its current and future economic, social and environmental impacts, addressing the needs of visitors, the industry, the environment and host communities.17 • Conservation Tourism, as defined by tourism researcher Prof. Ralf Buckley, is “commercial tourism which makes a net positive contribution to the continuing survival of threatened plant or animal species.”18 Buckley notes that while there are a variety of ways for tourism to add positive contributions to conservation, the key issue is to calculate net outcomes after subtracting the negative impacts.
  30. 30. • Responsible Tourism is tourism “that creates better places for people to live in, and better places to visit”.19 Responsible tourism can take place in any environment, and many cities have adopted responsible tourism policies. Responsible tourism is clearly defined in the Cape Town Declaration of 2002.20 • Pro-Poor Tourism is tourism that provides net benefits to poor people as defined by the Pro-Poor Tourism Partnership. • Community Based Tourism (CBT) is defined by The Mountain Institute and Regional Community Forestry Training Center as a visitor-host interaction that has meaningful participation by both, and generates economic and conservation benefits for local communities and environments
  31. 31. Defining Risk in Adventure Tourism Professor Buckley reviews risk in adventure tourism across six categories: · Commercial: The standard commercial risks associated with business management. Examples specific to tourism include travel market downturns or drops in visitors due to changing consumer preferences, terrorism, natural disasters, exchange rate shifts, and more. · Legal: Permits and licenses required for adventure tour operators to operate legally; ensuring that contractual arrangements with commercial partners and suppliers are appropriate. · Medical: Depending on the destination, conditions, and activities involved in the trip, advanced screening may involve age, strength, and general health. Risk factors here include fitness and pre-existing medical conditions.
  32. 32. Defining Risk in Adventure Tourism - Operational: Operational logistics of risk, such as itinerary details, gear, lodging and vehicle maintenance, and quality, as well as emergency operations, such as medical evacuations, carrying first aid kits, and guide training in field medicine. · - Physical: Physical safety during the adventure activity; the prevention of injury or disease. As mentioned above, this aspect garners the most sector attention. - Social: Managing interactions among clients, between clients and guides, and between the group and people in the community. Group harmony is important on adventure travel trips.
  33. 33. Adventure tourist trials in persentage
  34. 34. Dziękuję bardzo za uwagę!!!

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