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The time Measurement     names adopted by     Christians have a        pagan origin!Prepared by: Abo Karim El Marakshy    ...
The time Measurement names adopted by   Christians have a pagan originChristian should learn that the names of the 12 mont...
From this method, the first hour of each day was namedafter:1st day: Saturn2nd day: Sun3rd day: Moon4th day: Mars5th day: ...
   Latin: dies solis - Helios, god of the sun            Saxon: Sunnandaeg - god of the heat and light ball in the       ...
We also now know that its not unique - there arecountless other stars visible to the naked eye, some ofwhich are much brig...
The Japanese Buddhist statue as shown with a kouhai or gokou (halo), holding a trident weapon to protect babies & young ch...
Celtic CrossGlory Cross      Jesus with Halo The Pope holding the (Monstrance)               7
Its easy to understand why some people have writtenarticles supporting their firm belief that Christianity isactually a Pa...
In the past man believed there were a countless numberof gods, we now have the intelligence to reason that thereis only on...
Monday: Day of the MoonLatin: dies lunae - Luna or Selene goddess of the moonSaxon: mona - god of the light ball in the ni...
Tuesday: Day of Mars Latin: dies martis - Mars or Aires, god of war Saxon: Tiwesdaeg - etymologically related to Zeus. Tiw...
Wodens Cross / Odins Cross   Wodens CrossTo cover the rather messy dead eye, he wore a large floppyhat and compensated for...
Thors CrossThors CrossThors Cross is a misnomer: The symbol is not supposedto represent a cruciform, rather it is a hammer...
         Friday: Frias day    Latin: dies veneris - Venus or Aphrodite, goddess of love    Saxon: Frigedaeg - Freyas day ...
Origins of the month names        The word month stems from moon, and calendar stems    from calare (to call out), just as...
             May: This is from Maia a Roman goddess of earth,    honour and reverence. She was wife of Vulcan, mother of ...
of these months. December, for example, could have been    changed to Christ-month or Jesus-month.)           September: ...
Origins of the season names           Winter: No mythical god ... just cold! The season of    wind and white snow, hence ...
The Glorious Quran addressed these pagan ideas and dis-cussed them extensively. After all, pagan beliefs and customs arege...
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The time Measurement names adopted by Christians have a pagan origin!

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The time Measurement names adopted by Christians have a pagan origin!
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The time Measurement names adopted by Christians have a pagan origin!

  1. 1. The time Measurement names adopted by Christians have a pagan origin!Prepared by: Abo Karim El Marakshy 1
  2. 2. The time Measurement names adopted by Christians have a pagan originChristian should learn that the names of the 12 months arenamed after 12 mythical pagan gods. The seven celestial bodies identified by the Egyptian astronomers Lets go back to the Egyptian astronomers who identified seven celestial bodies: Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, the Sun, Venus, Mercury, and the Moon. The Egyptian astronomers divided the daylight timeinto 12 hours; a convenient number which divides cleanly by2, 3, 4 and 6. The night time was also divided by 12, but thelength of day hours and night hours would differ accordingto the season. They named each hour after a particular celestialbody:1st hour: Saturn2nd hour: Jupiter3rd hour: Mars4th hour: Sun5th hour: Venus6th hour: Mercury7th hour: MoonThe 8th hour would recycle to the Saturn hour, as would the15th and 22nd. Following this pattern, the 23rd hour would beJupiter, the 24th Mars, and the 1st hour of the next day wouldbe the Sun. 2
  3. 3. From this method, the first hour of each day was namedafter:1st day: Saturn2nd day: Sun3rd day: Moon4th day: Mars5th day: Mercury6th day: Jupiter7th day: VenusEach day was consecrated to the celestial body of its firsthour, which has resulted not only in us having seven days aweek, but also the names of those days.The first day of a week was Saturns day (Saturday), but ontheir flight from the Egyptians, the Jews changed this andmade Saturday their Sabbath, the last day of the week. Christians later moved observance of the Sabbathfrom Saturday to Sunday as part of their theological andhistorical split from Judaism, even though they respect theHebrew Scriptures2. So following the Jewish day numbering system, withthe last day of the week being Saturday, the first day of theweek became: Sunday. Sunday: Day of the Sun 3
  4. 4.  Latin: dies solis - Helios, god of the sun Saxon: Sunnandaeg - god of the heat and light ball in the sky. Sun worship has always been popular and for obvious reasons Ancient sun worship Its easy to understand how ancient man would look at the sun as the most powerful god. Today, we are more enlightened and know that the sun is just an enormous ball of gas.On the right is a photo of a stele from Urof the Chaldees, with the symbol of theBabylonian sun god Shamash within thecrescent of the moon goddess Nanna. 4
  5. 5. We also now know that its not unique - there arecountless other stars visible to the naked eye, some ofwhich are much brighter than our sun. The use of HalosThe word halo comes from the Greek halos, which meansthe ring of light shown around the sun. The Sun halo disc on the head of RaOther religions such as Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainismuse halos in iconography. 5
  6. 6. The Japanese Buddhist statue as shown with a kouhai or gokou (halo), holding a trident weapon to protect babies & young children. The Hindu god Shiva as shownwith Parvati, both with a halo. Shiva has a Third Eye, a necklacemade of skulls, a trident and a few snakes. Halos and Christianity The Consecration Cross, like the sun, is circular. And its not only the shape of this cross that makes Christianity appear to revere the sun. 6
  7. 7. Celtic CrossGlory Cross Jesus with Halo The Pope holding the (Monstrance) 7
  8. 8. Its easy to understand why some people have writtenarticles supporting their firm belief that Christianity isactually a Pagan form of sun worship.The halo seen in Christian icons,The The Last Supper (In Simon Ushakovs icon 1685)Eleven of the twelve apostles have haloes: only JudasIscariot does not. 8
  9. 9. In the past man believed there were a countless numberof gods, we now have the intelligence to reason that thereis only one supreme God (Allah), the creator of thisuniverse.Jesuit IHS symbolYes, the Jesuits use the sun as the symbol of Jesus Christ.The Jesuits are pretty conservative on cosmological issuesand like all Christians, they believe that Christ is the Lightand the Life. So why not depict this using an object weare all familiar with? Their choice of the sun isappropriate: When Jesus appeared before his disciples,"his face shone like the sun, and his garments becamewhite as light."4. The sun is used to remind us of the gloryof Christ.And of course there is the homophone the sun and theSon (Jesus), the Light of the world.Sunday is the day Christians set work aside so they canworship and we must thank old Egyptian astrology fornaming this day for us. They identified seven planets andnamed the greatest of these sun.Each day was named after a planet and the first day ofthe week, according to the Jews, was labelled after thegreatest planet, the sun. Hence we have Sunday.Saturday became the seventh day for the Jews, and thatwas their day of rest (Sabbath). 9
  10. 10. Monday: Day of the MoonLatin: dies lunae - Luna or Selene goddess of the moonSaxon: mona - god of the light ball in the night sky, and tidemaker. Crescent Cross This combination is used predominantly by the Catholic Church: Catholic Crescent and Cross Heres another symbol used by the Catholic Church: Marian Cross This cross has no particular Christian association, except in heraldry. It is also often used in Pagan art: Lunate Cross 10
  11. 11. Tuesday: Day of Mars Latin: dies martis - Mars or Aires, god of war Saxon: Tiwesdaeg - etymologically related to Zeus. Tiw lived on a high mountain and guided warriors who worshipped him. If a warrior died in battle Tiw would come down to earth with his angels and take the dead warrior to heaven.Wednesday: Wodens day Latin: dies mercurii - Mercury or Hermes, Messenger of the gods Saxon: Wodnesdaeg - Wodens day (King of the gods). Woden was the god who controlled all the other gods. His number-one mission was to gain all knowledge and wisdom. He visited all four corners of the world to gather information. Nothing could be hidden from him. In fact(!) he even wore out one of his eyes from seeing so much wisdom. 11
  12. 12. Wodens Cross / Odins Cross Wodens CrossTo cover the rather messy dead eye, he wore a large floppyhat and compensated for his sightlessness with blackbird oneach shoulder. These birds were his extra eyes and could flyoff to spy on people, and then report back to Woden. In thisway, Woden knew everything that was going on and peoplehad to be very careful how they behaved in case Woden waswatching. After all, as king of all gods, he could wreak havocon dissenters in any way he chose. Thursday: Thors dayThors HammerLatin: dies jovis - Jove or Zeus, god of thunderSaxon: Thuresdaeg - Thors day (god of thunder). Thunderwas the sign that Thor was angrily throwing his large hammeracross the sky.Its a good idea not to annoy this god. When he comesstorming after sinners, the sparks of his chariot wheels createthe lightening we see. 12
  13. 13. Thors CrossThors CrossThors Cross is a misnomer: The symbol is not supposedto represent a cruciform, rather it is a hammer andseldom seen in a Christian context.Christian symbolIn Christian iconography, a hammer represents that usedto drive nails through the hands and feet of Jesus prior toHis crucifixion. (See Hammer Cross.)Masonic symbolIn a Masonic context the heads also represent a hammeror an axe, and may be referred to as an Axe Head Crossor Brick-axe Cross, representing bricklayers and otherconstruction trades. (See Axe Cross.)Heraldic symbolCapital CrossIn heraldry it might be referred to as a Corniced,Cornished or Capiteau Cross composed of four columnswith capitals. 13
  14. 14.  Friday: Frias day Latin: dies veneris - Venus or Aphrodite, goddess of love Saxon: Frigedaeg - Freyas day (goddess of love). Frigg was a kind and beautiful Norse goddess and wife of Odin, the most powerful god. Their job was to oversee everything that happened in the world and Friggs specialty was love and marriage. (Interestingly, frig is a modern coarse euphemism for sex.) Saturday: Saturns day Latin: dies saturni - Saturn, god of agriculture Saxon: Seternes day (god of agriculture). People believed that the god named Saturn controlled the weather and hence the success or failure of crops. Sacrificing a farm animal to Saturni would increase the chances of pleasing the god, resulting in favourable weather and a good crop. Although our days are named after gods, the names were not regularly capitalized until the 17th century. (Relating this boring fact will do you no favours during dinner conversation, unless your companions are drunk.) 14
  15. 15. Origins of the month names The word month stems from moon, and calendar stems from calare (to call out), just as the ancient priests did when they announced a new moon. The month names we use were chosen to celebrate Roman deities and emperors. (Similar names are used in other European languages, such as French, German, Italian and Spanish.) January: Roman god Janus was the god of doorways, entrances, gateways, thresholds and beginnings, and therefore used for the opening of the New Year. February: This used to be the last month of the Roman calendar. On 15th day of the month was a Pagan festival of purification called Februa and so this month came to be known as Februas month. The day before that, and the day after (ides), was a holiday to honour Juno. The goddess Juno was the Queen of the Roman gods and goddesses, and also the goddess of women and marriage. Was it coincidence that the nasty Emperor Claudius II arranged for a priest named Valentine to be clubbed to death and then beheaded on this day? March: The Roman god Mars, god of war and guardian of the state. This was the first month of the ancient Roman calendar. April: Considered a sacred Roman month for the goddess Venus. The name April is probably from Apru, an Etruscan borrowing of Greek Aphrodite, a fertility goddess. Alternatively, it may stem from the Latin aperire (to open), as so many buds and blossoms open in this month (in the northern hemisphere). 15
  16. 16.  May: This is from Maia a Roman goddess of earth, honour and reverence. She was wife of Vulcan, mother of Mercury by Jupiter and daughter of Atlas. It became a popular girls name in English. June: The chief goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter and queen of the heavens and gods. July: Named after the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BC to deify and immortalize his name. Gaius Julius Caesar was born in this month, which was formerly Quintilis (fifth) month of the Roman calendar. August: Named in 8 BC after Augustus Caesar, the adopted heir of Julius Caesar and the first Roman emperor (31 BC - 14 AD). A synonym for the adjective august is venerable, and the emperor was known as the Venerable Caesar. Quite a contrast to the months original name, Weodmonao, which means month of weeds. Todays gardeners would agree with that. The next four months are just based on a mundane numbering system. The year used to begin in March, so September through to December were months 7 to 10. A numbering system is still used in many cultures today for the whole year. Modern Japanese, for example, has 1-gatsu, 2- gatsu, 3-gatsu ... 12-gatsu. Similarly in Chinese: 1-yuè, 2- yuè, 3-yuè ... 12-yuè. (Curiously, when Pope Gregory XIII changed the calendar system in 1582 and established the Gregorian calendar with January as the first month of the year, he did not rename any 16
  17. 17. of these months. December, for example, could have been changed to Christ-month or Jesus-month.) September: This name comes from the Latin septem, meaning seven. October: This name comes from the Latin octo, meaning eight. (Octopus - an 8-sided cat?) This is the month when people start thinking of Christmas and New Year parties. Amaze your friends by telling them the day of the week for Christmas Day and New Years Day; these days are always the same weekday as 2nd October. November: This name comes from the Latin novem, meaning nine. December: This name comes from the Latin decem, meaning ten. 17
  18. 18. Origins of the season names Winter: No mythical god ... just cold! The season of wind and white snow, hence the name winter. Spring: The time when new plants spring up after a harsh winter. Summer: From Old Norse sumarsdag, the time for lots of sunshine. Autumn: The time for reaping and harvesting the main crops of the year. The old English name for this season of harvest was replaced by the Latin autumnus in the 16th century. Also known as fall in America, as this is the time the temperature falls and leaves fall from the trees. (And youve probably noticed that already.) 18
  19. 19. The Glorious Quran addressed these pagan ideas and dis-cussed them extensively. After all, pagan beliefs and customs aregenerally similar in form and substance.(1) Say, "He is Allah, [who is] One,(2) Allah, the Eternal Refuge.(3) He neither begets nor is born,(4) Nor is there to Him any equivalent." The Noble Quran Surah 112- Al-Ikhlas ( Sincerity ) Sadly, it is the same pagan legacy that has led to Zionism and the Universal Crusade. This is just one of the many amazing facts that the Quran enlightens us with. It always puts the whole truth at our disposal in the clearest and most complete fashion, without the least ambiguity or complicated arguments. This is how we find the Glorious Quran—inimitable and calm in whatever it says and mandates. It says nothing but what is right. It speaks nothing but the truth. www.islamic-invitation.com 19

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