The Native Peoples of Canada Chapter 7
Read: Story on p. 182-3
Write out Chapter 7 Outline
Read Introduction (p.186) as a group
An introduction to Anthropology <ul><li>The study of human groupings and the interactions of human beings – how they struc...
 
The History of the Nunavut Inuit Ancient and Early History <ul><li>5,000 years ago   </li></ul><ul><li>The Tuniit or Dorse...
<ul><li>Between 3,000 and 2,000 years ago   </li></ul><ul><li>The Inuit peoples appear in the southern Bering Sea or North...
The Inuit of the Arctic <ul><li>The Arctic – N. Cdn, Alaska, Greenland </li></ul><ul><li>Inuit – largest ethnic group livi...
 
Caribou Inuit 1a – Copper Inuit 1b – Caribou Inuit
Women’s parka Men’s parka Caribou Inuit
Children’s Clothing <ul><li>The development of clothing from infancy to adulthood reflected a child’s changing role in Inu...
Copper Inuit men hunting
Looking for Food <ul><li>Inland Inuit  hunted caribou and musk-ox. </li></ul><ul><li>Coastal groups  depended on seal, wal...
<ul><li>The traditional hunting method would be to erect a series of inukshuiit in a funnel shaped pattern narrowing to a ...
Social Organization <ul><li>Inuit society was organized according to groups of people who hunted together, and on trading ...
The Iroquois of the Eastern Woodlands
The Iroquois <ul><li>Read p. 193 as a group </li></ul>Iroquois warrior
Legends p. 194-5 <ul><li>What is the difference between a legend and a myth? </li></ul><ul><li>Legend  – describes the cha...
Society & Government <ul><li>Iroquoian societies were  matrilineal  and  matrilocal . </li></ul><ul><li>Women owned the fi...
The Agriculture of the Iroquois <ul><li>Make a timeline to discuss what was happening during the 4 periods of time discuss...
 
The Peoples of the Plains <ul><li>Huge group of NA Indians spanning from current Manitoba to Alberta. </li></ul><ul><li>De...
The Hunt <ul><li>Bison were unpredictable – could stampede at any time. </li></ul><ul><li>Herds consisted of tens of thous...
 
The Sun Dance <ul><li>The central religious festival of the Plains peoples – the dancers sought visions by subjecting them...
 
The Sun Dance emphasizes the relationship between mankind and the universe which was perceived as existing in a cyclic har...
THE BLACKFOOT SUN DANCE <ul><li>The Sun Dance lodge was built by erecting a central pole hung with offerings to the Great ...
 
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The nativepeoplesofcanada

1,433 views

Published on

BC Canada SS 9 Curriculum Chapter 7 Crossroads

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,433
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
221
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
20
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The nativepeoplesofcanada

  1. 1. The Native Peoples of Canada Chapter 7
  2. 2. Read: Story on p. 182-3
  3. 3. Write out Chapter 7 Outline
  4. 4. Read Introduction (p.186) as a group
  5. 5. An introduction to Anthropology <ul><li>The study of human groupings and the interactions of human beings – how they structure their lives, deal with each other, and deal with the world around them. </li></ul><ul><li>Vocab : Subsistence, hunting and gathering, agriculture, domestication, shamanism, kinship, matrilocal, patrilocal, patriarchal, patrilineal, bilateral. </li></ul>
  6. 7. The History of the Nunavut Inuit Ancient and Early History <ul><li>5,000 years ago </li></ul><ul><li>The Tuniit or Dorset Culture peoples arrive in Alaska from Siberia ( Bering Land Bridge ), and then proceed to spread across the western Arctic and down the coasts of Greenland and Labrador. </li></ul><ul><li>The Tuniit bring with them the bow-and-arrow and finely tailored skin clothing similar to that used by the Inuit and northern Siberian peoples today. </li></ul>
  7. 8. <ul><li>Between 3,000 and 2,000 years ago </li></ul><ul><li>The Inuit peoples appear in the southern Bering Sea or Northern Pacific </li></ul><ul><li>About 1,000 years ago </li></ul><ul><li>Some of these Inuit peoples moved eastward across Arctic Canada. </li></ul><ul><li>The Inuit displace the Tuniit and establish the first Inuit settlements in Nunavut. </li></ul><ul><li>They bring with them Kayaks, throwing harpoons, large umiat (skin covered transport boats), strong sinew-backed bows for hunting, and well insulated houses made from boulders and turf. </li></ul>
  8. 9. The Inuit of the Arctic <ul><li>The Arctic – N. Cdn, Alaska, Greenland </li></ul><ul><li>Inuit – largest ethnic group living in Canada, they trace their ancestry back thousands of years BCE. </li></ul><ul><li>Most Inuit live along the coast. </li></ul><ul><li>Shelter is very important because of climate – temp can drop to below -30 degrees C in the winter. </li></ul><ul><li>Iglus in winter – warm safe home. How? </li></ul><ul><li>Clothing – made of caribou skin. How? </li></ul>
  9. 11. Caribou Inuit 1a – Copper Inuit 1b – Caribou Inuit
  10. 12. Women’s parka Men’s parka Caribou Inuit
  11. 13. Children’s Clothing <ul><li>The development of clothing from infancy to adulthood reflected a child’s changing role in Inuit society. </li></ul><ul><li>When the child was old enough to walk, it was dressed in a combination suit made from the complete skin of a young caribou. </li></ul>
  12. 14. Copper Inuit men hunting
  13. 15. Looking for Food <ul><li>Inland Inuit hunted caribou and musk-ox. </li></ul><ul><li>Coastal groups depended on seal, walrus, and whales. </li></ul><ul><li>Seal was very important because the blubber provided both energy and protein. </li></ul><ul><li>Fat was rendered into oil for lamps. </li></ul><ul><li>Snow was melted for drinking water. </li></ul><ul><li>Meat eaten raw because cooking by lamps took too long. </li></ul><ul><li>Dog sleds and kayaks used for hunting and transportation. </li></ul>
  14. 16. <ul><li>The traditional hunting method would be to erect a series of inukshuiit in a funnel shaped pattern narrowing to a dead end on a hillside. </li></ul><ul><li>The hunters would hide behind the inukshuiit armed with their bows and arrows. </li></ul><ul><li>The women and children would herd the caribou towards the hunters by waving hides up and down to create loud noises, enabling the hunters to move behind the herd. </li></ul>THE INUKSHUK
  15. 17. Social Organization <ul><li>Inuit society was organized according to groups of people who hunted together, and on trading partnerships between groups who had different goods to offer. </li></ul><ul><li>Some had patrilineal bonds (p.192) </li></ul><ul><li>All Inuit shared a belief in the spirit force of the universe and the need to behave in a certain way in order to ensure existence with nature. </li></ul><ul><li>Illness and misfortune was a signal to the community that they hadn’t acted properly </li></ul>
  16. 18. The Iroquois of the Eastern Woodlands
  17. 19. The Iroquois <ul><li>Read p. 193 as a group </li></ul>Iroquois warrior
  18. 20. Legends p. 194-5 <ul><li>What is the difference between a legend and a myth? </li></ul><ul><li>Legend – describes the challenges and adventures of a heroic person. </li></ul><ul><li>Myth – explains something about the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Read the legend of Dekanawida </li></ul><ul><li>Answer p.195 #1 Activity 7-2 </li></ul>
  19. 21. Society & Government <ul><li>Iroquoian societies were matrilineal and matrilocal . </li></ul><ul><li>Women owned the fields where crops were grown. </li></ul><ul><li>When a couple married, they lived with the bride’s family. </li></ul><ul><li>3 level system of government: </li></ul><ul><li>Local- </li></ul><ul><li>Tribal – </li></ul><ul><li>Confederacy - </li></ul>
  20. 22. The Agriculture of the Iroquois <ul><li>Make a timeline to discuss what was happening during the 4 periods of time discussed on p. 196: </li></ul><ul><li>500 CE – </li></ul><ul><li>2. 500 to 1300 CE – </li></ul><ul><li>3. 1300 to 1400 CE – </li></ul><ul><li>4. 1400 to 1600 CE – </li></ul>
  21. 24. The Peoples of the Plains <ul><li>Huge group of NA Indians spanning from current Manitoba to Alberta. </li></ul><ul><li>Depended on mainly one animal – Bison </li></ul><ul><li>50 to 100 people operated a bison drive </li></ul><ul><li>Subsisted on its meat, made household and personal items from its hide, hair, horns, and bones. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: tipis for shelter, … </li></ul>
  22. 25. The Hunt <ul><li>Bison were unpredictable – could stampede at any time. </li></ul><ul><li>Herds consisted of tens of thousands </li></ul><ul><li>Herds were funneled towards a location where they could be killed. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex. Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump </li></ul><ul><li>Buffalo would be guided into pounds where hunters could kill them easier. </li></ul>
  23. 27. The Sun Dance <ul><li>The central religious festival of the Plains peoples – the dancers sought visions by subjecting themselves to pain and suffering. </li></ul><ul><li>Held in the summer, the sponsor fasted while a lodge for the ceremony would be built. </li></ul><ul><li>Description on p.201 </li></ul>
  24. 29. The Sun Dance emphasizes the relationship between mankind and the universe which was perceived as existing in a cyclic harmonious balance. Artist Peter Whyte (Canadian, 1905-1966) entitled this painting: Blackfoot Sun Dance Camp. (1955, oil on masonite).
  25. 30. THE BLACKFOOT SUN DANCE <ul><li>The Sun Dance lodge was built by erecting a central pole hung with offerings to the Great Spirit. </li></ul><ul><li>This was surrounded with a circle of 10 more poles. Leafy branches covered the top. </li></ul><ul><li>The dancers consisted of a few men who fasted and have prayed. </li></ul><ul><li>Sharp skewers (thin sticks) pierce the skin of the dancers' back and chest. Ropes were tied from the skewers to the center pole. </li></ul><ul><li>They danced in the sacred circle around the center pole . </li></ul><ul><li>The dancers try to break away from the center pole to end the dance. </li></ul>

×