2013 war of 1812

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2013 war of 1812

  1. 1. The War of 1812 p.320
  2. 2. U.S. After Revolutionary War
  3. 3. War of 1812 1. Rick Mercer 2. Make a chart with 2 titles: Causes & Outcomes • Crash Course
  4. 4. Introduction • The Americans were annoyed by many things, including the loss of trading privileges within the British Empire. • The British thought the US was a threat to the British fur trade. • The populations of BNA & the US were…(check your textbook)
  5. 5. Major Players • President Thomas Jefferson (1801-1809) stated that, “Winning the war was merely a matter of marching.” • “War Hawks” political party led by James Madison (president from 1809-1817) wanted war. • A Native Confederacy led by a great Shawnee warrior named Tecumseh to defend its own territories from the Americans. • New England were against war – wanted to renew their profitable trade with Britain & the colonies.
  6. 6. • British General Sir Isaac Brock lead British forces. Died in the battle for Queenston Heights near Niagara Falls. • American General & Governor of the Michigan Territory William Hull. • Laura Secord alerted the British of a planned American invasion of Beaver Dams
  7. 7. Causes of the War • British interference with American shipping – naval blockade • Impressment (kidnapping) American sailors • American expansion into Canada. • British felt Americans threatening the fur trade.
  8. 8. Major Events • See p. 320
  9. 9. Outcomes of the War • • • • Last invasion of Canadian territory. Changed no boundaries. Confirmed the existence of Canada. People of Upper Canada became more loyal to Britain, and less like Americans. • Americans felt more patriotic. Felt they had fended off a strong military power, even though they had larger numbers or troops. • No clear winner. Argument for 200 years.

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