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Facebook and Patient Safety

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Presentation at the 2nd Patient Safety Congress, 29 Mar 2019. PICC, Manila.

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Facebook and Patient Safety

  1. 1. FACEBOOK & PATIENT SAFETY IRIS THIELE ISIP TAN MD, MSC Professor 3, University of the Philippines College of Medicine Director, UP Manila Interactive Learning Center Chief, University of the Philippines Medical Informatics Unit
  2. 2. NOTHING TO DISCLOSE I give consent for the audience to tweet this talk and give me feedback (@endocrine_witch). Feel free take pictures of my slides (though it will be on www.slideshare.net/isiptan).
  3. 3. 1 Filipinos are using Facebook to look for health information.
  4. 4. Pei-Li Teh & Marc Yates (2013) researchpartnership.com Nine in ten had accessed the internet looking for healthcare information, with almost 3/4s having done so in the last month.
  5. 5. GENERAL HEALTHCARE WEBSITES ONLINE HEALTH FORUMS HEALTH COMMUNITY WEBSITES DISEASE WEBSITES CLINICAL WEBSITES PHARMACEUTICAL WEBSITES WIKIS E-NEWSLETTER FACEBOOK % 0 25 50 75 100 HEALTH INFORMATION SOURCES EVER USED Pei-Li Teh & Marc Yates (2013) researchpartnership.com (Philippines) 25%
  6. 6. www.fb.com/EndocrineWitch 144 K followers
  7. 7. www.fb.com/EndocrineWitch DOK BRU
  8. 8. Do cultural variations exist in patterns of online health information seeking? Song et al. Trusting Social Media as a Source of Health Information: Online Surveys Comparing the United States, Korea, and Hong Kong. J Med Internet Res 2016;18(3):e25) US Hong Kong Korea
  9. 9. HEALTH INFORMATIONSong et al. J Med Internet Res 2016;18(3):e25) Expertise-based information produced by medical professionals Experience-based information laypersons’ subjective first-hand experiences of health & illness
  10. 10. HEALTH INFORMATIONSong et al. J Med Internet Res 2016;18(3):e25) Expertise-based information Americans showed a stronger preference for WebMD & CDC Experience-based information Asians showed more trust in blogs, online support groups & social networking sites
  11. 11. 2 Filipinos are using Facebook for peer-to- peer healthcare.
  12. 12. … the average person with diabetes spends no more than 0.1% of their time in the course of an entire year discussing health matters with a medical professional. Hernandez M. Diabetes Manage. 2013;3(3):203-205 “
  13. 13. Lewinski AA & Fisher EB. Chronic Illness 2016 Chronic Illness 12(2):116-144. Interactions are not constrained by geographical limitations.
  14. 14. 3 How can Facebook be used to get reliable health information to patients?
  15. 15. Rus HM & Cameron LD. Ann Behav Med 2016;50(5):678-689. Content analysis of health communications posted on diabetes-related Facebook pages (n=10; 50 posts each) Coding categories: •illness representation information (identity, cause, consequence, control, and timeline), imagery •negative affect •positive affect •social support •positive identity •crowdsourcing •use of external links and videos
  16. 16. Illness Representations, Coping, and Illness Outcomes in People with Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Systematic Review Illness Representations in Cancer - Scientific Figure on ResearchGate. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/figure/ The-common-sense-model-of-self-regulation-of-health-and-illness-Leventhal-et-al-1980_fig1_305344696 [accessed 27 Dec, 2018] THE COMMON SENSE MODEL OF SELF-REGULATION AND ILLNESS
  17. 17. Rus HM & Cameron LD. Ann Behav Med 2016;50(5):678-689. HYPOTHESIS Illness representation, imagery, positive affect, social support and positive self- identity —> higher user engagement (likes, shares, comments) Negative affect will deter engagement
  18. 18. Rus HM & Cameron LD. Ann Behav Med 2016;50(5):678-689. Posts with imagery had 4.25 times more likes vs posts without imagery
  19. 19. Rus HM & Cameron LD. Ann Behav Med 2016;50(5):678-689. IMAGERY AND USER ENGAGEMENT LIKES
  20. 20. Rus HM & Cameron LD. Ann Behav Med 2016;50(5):678-689. SHARES
  21. 21. Rus HM & Cameron LD. Ann Behav Med 2016;50(5):678-689. ILLNESS REPRESENTATION ATTRIBUTES AND USER ENGAGEMENT Symptoms and timeline information did not predict user engagement Shared/liked more: control information Shared more: consequence information
  22. 22. Rus HM & Cameron LD. Ann Behav Med 2016;50(5):678-689. AFFECTIVE TONE AND USER ENGAGEMENT Positive affect did not predict higher engagement. Text-only messages with negative affect had relatively higher likes and comments.
  23. 23. Reach: 1.3M Engagements: 167,526
  24. 24. SOCIAL SUPPORT & POSITIVE IDENTITY AND USER ENGAGEMENT Rus HM & Cameron LD. Ann Behav Med 2016;50(5):678-689. Social support posts prompt comments Positive identity posts motivate users to share the message with others
  25. 25. Rus HM & Cameron LD. Ann Behav Med 2016;50(5):678-689. EXTERNAL LINKS AS AN ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY 55% of posts had external links Had lower user engagement
  26. 26. HOW TO PACKAGE MESSAGES ON SOCIAL MEDIA Logan A. Community hypertension programs in the age of mobile technology & social media. Am J Hypertension 2014;27(8): 1033-1035
  27. 27. What is the optimal size for an online network for a behavioral intervention? Pagoda S. et al. Adapting Behavioral Interventions for Social Media Delivery J Med Internet Res 2016;18(1):e24
  28. 28. What is the ideal structure of a group intervention? Pagoda S. et al. Adapting Behavioral Interventions for Social Media Delivery J Med Internet Res 2016;18(1):e24
  29. 29. Pagoda S. et al. Adapting Behavioral Interventions for Social Media Delivery J Med Internet Res 2016;18(1):e24 WHAT IS MEANINGFUL ENGAGEMENT?
  30. 30. FOR WHOM? Pagoda S. et al. Adapting Behavioral Interventions for Social Media Delivery J Med Internet Res 2016;18(1):e24
  31. 31. @endocrine_witch

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