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Content 
Industrial Design⋯the roots 
Guiding Principles | Process | Case Study 
Sustainability Overview 
Methodology | Tr...
Industrial Design 
⋯the roots
Industrial Design 
“The professional service of creating and developing concepts and 
specifications that optimize the fun...
Primary Responsibilities 
• All aspects of the product that relate to the user 
• Aesthetic appeal (Form Factors) 
• Tacti...
Manufacturing & Fabrication Techniques 
Material Knowledge + Properties +Finishes 
Engineering + Technical Specification 
...
Industrial Design Workflow 
Identify 
Customer 
Needs 
Establish 
Target 
Specifications 
Generate 
Product 
Concepts 
Sel...
Problem Statement | Challenge | Discovery 
Discovery of Latent Needs of Consumer/User 
(Ethnography, In-Field, Research, C...
Case Study - Motorola 
Martin Cooper DynaTAC, 1983 ($3995) 
MicroTAC, 1989 ($2495) 
StarTAC, 1996 ($1000) 
Millions of Uni...
StarTAC Differentiating Success Factors 
• Small Size and Weight Lithium ion battery, 88grams, foldability, 
worn like a p...
Assessing the importance of industrial design for the StarTAC 
Needs Level of Importance 
Ergonomics 
Ease of use 
Ease of...
Industrial Design 
⋯through the lens of sustainability
What is “Sustainability” 
“The synergistic act of 
existing within living 
systems without upsetting 
the balance or endan...
“Designers are at least in part responsible for all 
the waste we see in the world.” 
“Design for the Real World,” Victor ...
Case for Sustainable Design Implementation 
• Transparency to Customers + Industry 
• Lower Costs 
• Remove Risks 
• Marke...
Innovation 
• Rethink ow to provide the benefit 
• Provide needs provided by associated 
products 
• Enable sharing of pro...
Closed Loop Product / Material Flow Overview 
Copyright (C) 1999-2011 Ricoh Co.,Ltd. 
Product 
Ecosystem
"The future of sustainable products will not just be about materials, 
toxicity, energy use, or recyclability – it will be...
Lifecycle Thinking + Guidelines 
Innovation 
• Rethink ow to provide the benefit 
• Provide needs provided by associated 
...
Phi Logic 
! 
Where design-thinking and life-cycle 
processes collide to innovate and grow 
products, services, environmen...
Industrial design presentation
Industrial design presentation
Industrial design presentation
Industrial design presentation
Industrial design presentation
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Industrial design presentation

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Overview of the Industrial Designer and sustainability in product design.

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Industrial design presentation

  1. 1. Content Industrial Design⋯the roots Guiding Principles | Process | Case Study Sustainability Overview Methodology | Triple Bottom Line | Lifecycle Thinking | Case Study Closing Company Examples
  2. 2. Industrial Design ⋯the roots
  3. 3. Industrial Design “The professional service of creating and developing concepts and specifications that optimize the function, value, and appearance of products and systems for the mutual benefit of both user and manufacturer.” -IDSA “The profession of opportunistic solution-building in the form of products, services, environments, organizations, and modes of interaction through a multi-faceted lens for the well-being of humanity and the biosphere in which we exist.” -Irwin
  4. 4. Primary Responsibilities • All aspects of the product that relate to the user • Aesthetic appeal (Form Factors) • Tactile Features (Feel) • Functional Interface • Sensorial
  5. 5. Manufacturing & Fabrication Techniques Material Knowledge + Properties +Finishes Engineering + Technical Specification Visual Communication Techniques (Illustration) 2D Software 3D CAD Software Ergonomics (Human Factors) Scale Model Making / Prototyping Packaging Graphic Design / Branding / Typography Strategic Production Planning Market Trending User Interface Empathy Humility Listening Storytelling Understanding Latent User Needs Holistic Implications (social, cultural, societal) Highly Collaborative Aesthetic sensibility + Form Detail Project Management + Workflow Hand-on Approach Technical Proficiency Research + Development + Datamining Systems Thinking
  6. 6. Industrial Design Workflow Identify Customer Needs Establish Target Specifications Generate Product Concepts Select Product Concepts Test Product Concepts Set Final Specifications Plan Downstream Development Perform Economic Analysis Benchmark Competitive Products Build and Test Models and Prototypes Mission Statement Development Plan
  7. 7. Problem Statement | Challenge | Discovery Discovery of Latent Needs of Consumer/User (Ethnography, In-Field, Research, Client Driven) ! Identify Goals & Opportunities | Evaluate Methodology+ Prioritize Mind Map, Brainstorm, Biomimicry, Resource Allocation, Product Planning & Development, Competitive Analysis ! Concept Development Hand Renderings, Digital Renderings (25-100), Industry Expert Consultation ! Concept Testing | Packaging Low- Fi Prototypes, Rendering Iterations, Human Factors, Model Analysis, Surveys ! Prototype Testing & Review (High-Fi) CADD, Engineering, Consumer Testing, Review/Refine Function +Form Material ! Refine & Finalize for Production | Implementation Design for Manufacturability (DFM, Detailed Material + Mechanical Specifications) Process Outline
  8. 8. Case Study - Motorola Martin Cooper DynaTAC, 1983 ($3995) MicroTAC, 1989 ($2495) StarTAC, 1996 ($1000) Millions of Units Sold
  9. 9. StarTAC Differentiating Success Factors • Small Size and Weight Lithium ion battery, 88grams, foldability, worn like a pager, even necklace Continuous talk time of 60 minutes with slim battery, alphanumeric memory store numbers and names, stack to recall 10 numbers dialed, caller ID, voice messaging, silent vibration, accessories • Performance Features Complements human face, angled position of earpiece with respect to mouthpiece, conforms to user for superior comfort. Spacing and position of buttons based on accepted standards for faster more accurate dialing. Folding design allows user to answer and end calls by opening or closing keypad • Superior Ergonomics Designed to meet rigorous specifications. Can be dropped from 4ft. onto cement floor, or sat on in the open position without sustaining visible or operational damage. Withstand temperature extremes, humidity, shock, dust, and vibration • Durability Single circuit board consists entirely of electronic components assembled using automated equipment. Replicated at Motorola factories around the world to meet global capacity demands • Ease of Manufacture Sleek appearance and black color gave it a futuristic look associated with innovation. Aesthetic appeal = status symbol that evoked strong feelings of pride among owners • Appearance
  10. 10. Assessing the importance of industrial design for the StarTAC Needs Level of Importance Ergonomics Ease of use Ease of maintenance Quantity of user interactions Novelty of user interactions Aesthetics Safety Product differentiation Pride of ownership, fashion, or image Team motivation
  11. 11. Industrial Design ⋯through the lens of sustainability
  12. 12. What is “Sustainability” “The synergistic act of existing within living systems without upsetting the balance or endangering the future livelihood of that which offers the resources used for survival.” -Irwin
  13. 13. “Designers are at least in part responsible for all the waste we see in the world.” “Design for the Real World,” Victor Papanek
  14. 14. Case for Sustainable Design Implementation • Transparency to Customers + Industry • Lower Costs • Remove Risks • Market Advantage • Benchmarking for Future Success • Corporate Social Responsibility • Employee Retention • Long-Term Shareholder Value • Customer Loyalty • Build Better, Safer Products • Protects Employees • Protects the Planet • Profit • Creates a Circular Economy • Recoup Usable Materials • Reduced in Insurance Premiums ! 70% of costs of product development, manufacture and use are decided in early design stages (1991 National Research Council Report titled “Improving Engineering Design”)
  15. 15. Innovation • Rethink ow to provide the benefit • Provide needs provided by associated products • Enable sharing of products by many people • Anticipate technological change and build in flexibility • Design to mimic nature • Use living organisms in products Efficient Distribution Low Impact Materials • Avoid materials that damage human health, ecological health, or deplete resources • Use minimal materials • Use renewable resources • Use waste byproducts • Use throughly tested materials Lifecycle Thinking Offers a holistic view of a product or process from raw material extraction through manufacturing and product use to end-of-life Optimized End of Life • Integrate methods for product collection • Provide for ease of disassembly • Provide for recycling or down cycling • Design reuse, or “next life of product” • Provide for reuse of components • Provide ability to biodegrade • Provide for safe disposal Optimized Manufacturing • Design for ease of production quality control • Minimize manufacturing waste • Minimize energy production • Minimize number of production methods and operations • Minimize number of parts / materials • Reduce products and packaging weight • Use reusable or recyclable packaging • Use an efficient transport system • Use local production and assembly Low Impact Use • Minimize emissions / Integrate renewable energy sources • Reduce energy inefficiencies • Reduce water use inefficiencies • Reduce material use inefficiencies Product Ecosystem Optimized Lifetime • Build in desire for long term product care • Design easy product take-back programs • Build in durability • Design for maintenance and day repair • Design for upgrades • Design second life with other functions
  16. 16. Closed Loop Product / Material Flow Overview Copyright (C) 1999-2011 Ricoh Co.,Ltd. Product Ecosystem
  17. 17. "The future of sustainable products will not just be about materials, toxicity, energy use, or recyclability – it will be about empowering consumers with the ability to lead their lives in a more environmentally positive way to engage in citizen-driven causes, increase local prosperity and engage in community revitalization.
  18. 18. Lifecycle Thinking + Guidelines Innovation • Rethink ow to provide the benefit • Provide needs provided by associated products • Enable sharing of products by many people • Anticipate technological change and build in flexibility • Design to mimic nature • Use living organisms in products Efficient Distribution • Reduce products and packaging weight • Use reusable or recyclable packaging • Use an efficient transport system • Use local production and assembly Low Impact Materials • Avoid materials that damage human health, ecological health, or deplete resources • Use minimal materials • Use renewable resources • Use waste byproducts • Use throughly tested materials Low Impact Use • Minimize emissions / Integrate renewable energy sources • Reduce energy inefficiencies • Reduce water use inefficiencies • Reduce material use inefficiencies Optimized Lifetime • Build in desire for long term product care • Design easy product take-back programs • Build in durability • Design for maintenance and day repair • Design for upgrades • Design second life with other functions Optimized Manufacturing • Design for ease of production quality control • Minimize manufacturing waste • Minimize energy production • Minimize number of production methods and operations • Minimize number of parts / materials Optimized End of Life • Integrate methods for product collection • Provide for ease of disassembly • Provide for recycling or down cycling • Design reuse, or “next life of product” • Provide for reuse of components • Provide ability to biodegrade • Provide for safe disposal
  19. 19. Phi Logic ! Where design-thinking and life-cycle processes collide to innovate and grow products, services, environments, and experiences. ! www.philogic.co

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