Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
IRTL Grants & Fellowships Workshop
Series
Part II: Budget
Preparation for
Research Projects
Institute for Research on Teac...
Dr. Marcy Wallace, Associate Director
wallacem@msu.edu
Megan Drangstveit, Graduate Assistant
mdrangst@msu.edu
Institute fo...
Institute for Research on Teaching & Learning
IRTL supports doctoral students in the College of
Education by enhancing the...
1. Learn how education researchers develop a
project budget.
2. Understand what funding agencies view as
legitimate expens...
• Grants allow for more time dedicated to
your research
• Professional development opportunity
• Shows ability to prepare ...
Audience Poll (think, pair, share)
Budget Basics
• Many funders provide mandatory budget forms
that must be submitted with the proposal. Others
specify the budget categori...
Stipend (i.e. salary)
• Stipend rates and ranges can be calculated using
information from Michigan State’s Human Resources...
Undergraduate student
• You may choose to hire an undergraduate student
(e.g. to manually enter data).
Tuition and Fees
• ...
Faculty Advisor’s Salary
• Buying out your faculty advisor's time may be necessary if
your advisor serves as a primary inv...
Health Insurance
• Health insurance can be calculated using Michigan State’s
graduate student stipend information.
• http:...
Supplies
• List any special items that will
be consumed by the project,
such as office supplies;
video/audio tapes. All it...
Travel
• All travel needs to be itemized, such as specific
trips to research sites or conferences. Airfare rates
can be ob...
Lodging/Meals
• Lodging costs can be obtained from hotels directly. Food
costs can be computed from Michigan State's per d...
Equipment/Technology
• All equipment purchases must be itemized with current
market prices listed.
• Some funding organiza...
Expenses of doing business that are necessary for the operation of the
organization or program and activities it performs....
• Travel (mileage to/from research sites;
gasoline; conferences; international
trips; car rental; etc.)
• Lodging/Meals
• ...
How to Prepare a
Budget
• Well-planned budgets reflect carefully
thought-out projects.
• Budgets are road maps showing how
your project will be im...
Most funding organizations require that a proposed budget be based
upon a good faith estimate of the anticipated costs. Th...
• Many applicants struggle to prepare a competitive
budget request.
• > Some people inflate the budget because they are
co...
• Include your time as a level of % effort (at MSU),
instead of hours or months
• Make certain the budget adds up correctl...
• If you tend to be a cost-conscious person,
remember the funder can choose to
negotiate costs.
• They may draw a line thr...
Although you may prepare
the budget last, remember
many reviewers look at the
budget first!
Reviewers
Jane Geever, author of The Foundation Center's Guide
to Proposal Writing, conducted interviews with a
number of grantmaker...
"I look at the budget. Over the years I've
learned that narrative can be enriching,
but the numbers are stark and
straight...
"I skip around the document in the
following way: first the budget, to see if
the request is appropriate and to see the
ag...
"I often look at the budget and then read
the proposal backwards."
Michael Gilligan The Henry Luce Foundation, Inc.
"How d...
How to Manage a
Grant
Student: Comes up with great idea & application
Faculty/Department/College: Assists with application
preparation; May fund...
There are two primary ways to receive most grant
awards:
1. Personally / direct
2. Through the university
You will likely ...
Things to Consider
If handled through MSU:
• Cannot pay for personal groceries, but can pay
for participant food (no matte...
Sample Budgets
It may be helpful to review examples of budgets and
budget descriptions for AAUW, AERA, AIR,
Fulbright, NSF, and Spencer
I...
Budget Guidelines - AAUW
“Budget –
information is
required for
administrative and
U.S. Internal
Revenue Service
(IRS) purp...
There is no specific format for the budget section. Funds may
be used for tuition and/or institutional fees, living expens...
Sample Budget – AERA/AIR
• Travel expenses, including excess baggage
to and from the residence of the fellow to
the host country of research.
• Mai...
• In general, grants are awarded for up to 24 months.
• Funds are to be used exclusively for the necessary expenses
incurr...
The Graduate School and the college support more than 20 students
each year, providing a $6,000 fellowship which allows st...
This fellowship provides financial support for advanced doctoral students
who have projected or incurred expenses relevant...
Resources
IRTL budget preparation: http://education.msu.edu/irtl/grad/budget.asp
IRTL budget samples: http://education.msu.edu/irtl/...
• Workshops, sessions for groups and classes
• Overview of grants & fellowships; Grant proposal
writing; Budget developmen...
Please join us for other workshops in this
Grants and Fellowships series:
How to Write a Competitive Grant Application
• T...
KIN 895 Research Ethics, 1 cr. course, Summer 2015
Identifying and resolving ethical problems in research. Collegial
inter...
• Workshop topic ideas
• Web and newsletter content suggestions
• New award information
• Updates on your grant/fellowship...
Institute for Research on Teaching and Learning
2nd Floor, Erickson Hall
http://education.msu.edu/irtl/grad
https://www.fa...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

2015-02Budgets

726 views

Published on

Michigan State University (MSU) - College of Education - Institute for Research on Teaching and Learning (IRTL) Grants and Fellowships Workshop Series - Part II: Budget Preparation for Research Projects - February 2015 - Megan Drangstveit, Marcy Wallace

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

2015-02Budgets

  1. 1. IRTL Grants & Fellowships Workshop Series Part II: Budget Preparation for Research Projects Institute for Research on Teaching and Learning Doctoral Student Research Support February 2015
  2. 2. Dr. Marcy Wallace, Associate Director wallacem@msu.edu Megan Drangstveit, Graduate Assistant mdrangst@msu.edu Institute for Research on Teaching & Learning Audience members… Introductions
  3. 3. Institute for Research on Teaching & Learning IRTL supports doctoral students in the College of Education by enhancing their knowledge of funding opportunities and grant writing. We are available to discuss funding opportunities; assist in conceptualizing, writing, and revising a grant proposal; or assist in preparing a competitive budget request. http://education.msu.edu/irtl/grad What is IRTL?
  4. 4. 1. Learn how education researchers develop a project budget. 2. Understand what funding agencies view as legitimate expenses of research. 3. Identify resources to help with budget creation. 4. View sample budgets. 5. Create your own project budget. Learning Objectives
  5. 5. • Grants allow for more time dedicated to your research • Professional development opportunity • Shows ability to prepare grants for academic job applications Why is budget preparation important?
  6. 6. Audience Poll (think, pair, share)
  7. 7. Budget Basics
  8. 8. • Many funders provide mandatory budget forms that must be submitted with the proposal. Others specify the budget categories that they will approve. • The following budget categories are commonly used. These are general guidelines. • For specific proposals, please consult the agency's request for proposal (RFP). Typical Budget Categories
  9. 9. Stipend (i.e. salary) • Stipend rates and ranges can be calculated using information from Michigan State’s Human Resources Department. Always include as the first line-item. • Ranges, MSUHR: http://www.hr.msu.edu/hiring/studentemployment/ gradasst/stipendRanges.htm • Rates: http://education.msu.edu/resources/documents/Gra duate-stipend-rates.pdf Direct Costs: Personnel
  10. 10. Undergraduate student • You may choose to hire an undergraduate student (e.g. to manually enter data). Tuition and Fees • Tuition and fees can be calculated using Michigan State’s tuition and fees calculator: http://www.ctlr.msu.edu/COStudentAccounts/Tuiti onCalculatorFall.aspx Direct Costs: Personnel
  11. 11. Faculty Advisor’s Salary • Buying out your faculty advisor's time may be necessary if your advisor serves as a primary investigator or co-PI to the project. • Person months vs % of effort Interpreter • For example, hiring an interpreter for international projects. • * This could be filed under an “Other” category, depending on institutional/funder guidelines. Direct Costs: Personnel
  12. 12. Health Insurance • Health insurance can be calculated using Michigan State’s graduate student stipend information. • http://www.hr.msu.edu/hiring/studentemployment/gradasst/ stipendRanges.htm Fringe Benefits • If faculty support is required, you may need to add fringe benefits: • https://cga.msu.edu/PL/Portal/DocumentViewer.aspx?cga=a QBkAD0AOQA1AA== Direct Costs: Employee Benefits
  13. 13. Supplies • List any special items that will be consumed by the project, such as office supplies; video/audio tapes. All items should be listed separately and based upon current prices. Copying & Printing • Estimate the number of photocopies to be made by the project and compute the cost based upon the current prices. Transcription Fees Postage • Estimate the number of items to be sent by first class and/or bulk rate and compute the expected cost. Communications • Phone cards for use on international trips, renting a satellite phone, etc. Incentives for Participants • Offering gift cards, refreshments for focus groups, etc. Direct Costs: Supplies & Services
  14. 14. Travel • All travel needs to be itemized, such as specific trips to research sites or conferences. Airfare rates can be obtained from airlines directly. Mileage to/from sites can be determined with Michigan State's published mileage rates. • MSU: http://ctlr.msu.edu/combp/ex70a.aspx Direct Costs: Travel
  15. 15. Lodging/Meals • Lodging costs can be obtained from hotels directly. Food costs can be computed from Michigan State's per diem allowances or the U.S. State Department's Foreign Per Diem Rates by Location. • MSU: http://ctlr.msu.edu/combp/ex70a.aspx • DeptOfState: http://aoprals.state.gov/web920/per_diem.asp Other • Additional costs for items such as tips, taxi, parking, and conference rooms should be included. Direct Costs: Travel
  16. 16. Equipment/Technology • All equipment purchases must be itemized with current market prices listed. • Some funding organizations do not allow the purchase of equipment, others require specific approval for equipment purchases, and others require equipment be turned over to the funding agency at the end of the grant period. • MSU guidelines: <$5,000 is considered a supply, which may differ than agency guidelines. Direct Costs: Equipment
  17. 17. Expenses of doing business that are necessary for the operation of the organization or program and activities it performs. • Costs such as heat, light, trash and snow removal, accounting – • IDC rates are used to distribute these costs • IDC are real expenses that afford the grantor access to your services For indirect cost percentages, visit Michigan State’s Current Facilities & Administrative Cost Rates: http://www.cga.msu.edu/PL/Portal/DocumentViewer.aspx?cga=aQBkAD0AMQA2ADUA Most graduate student research grant programs do not allow indirect costs. What do you think MSU’s IDC rate is? (53.5%) Indirect costs (IDC)?
  18. 18. • Travel (mileage to/from research sites; gasoline; conferences; international trips; car rental; etc.) • Lodging/Meals • Software • Health insurance • Recruiting subjects • Research Assistant salary • Interpreter (e.g., for international projects) • Undergraduate student hourly pay (general—includes teachers, etc., working on the project) • Printing • Equipment/Technology (software; A/V equipment) • Supplies (e.g., stationery; video/audio tapes) • Tech support (e.g., processing statistics) • Services (e.g., mentor) • Postage/telephone/fax/internet charges • Transcription • Publication/Dissemination of findings • Incentives (participants/subjects) • Stipend (i.e., salary) • Training • Tuition and fees • Advisor? (i.e., her summer and/or academic year salary—calculated by % of faculty time dedicated to the project, e.g., 25%). May be necessary if advisor serves as Primary Investigator or co-PI to project. • Indirect costs (i.e., “overhead”) What are Possible allowable project expenses? * * These are general guidelines. For individualized assistance with questions on expenses allowed by a particular funding agency, please consult IRTL staff and agency guidelines.
  19. 19. How to Prepare a Budget
  20. 20. • Well-planned budgets reflect carefully thought-out projects. • Budgets are road maps showing how your project will be implemented and managed. Prepare Your Budget
  21. 21. Most funding organizations require that a proposed budget be based upon a good faith estimate of the anticipated costs. Three things to keep in mind in preparing your budget: • Is it necessary? Is it required to successfully complete the project? • Is it allowable? Is it permitted within the application guidelines or has it been explicitly approved by the funding agency? Only include things the funder is willing to support. • Is it reasonable? Does the amount reflect a prudent estimate of the costs? Cost estimates cannot be made up. They must have a reasonable basis. Project your expenses as accurately as possible. If required, properly estimate cost-sharing to meet the requirements. Prepare Your Budget
  22. 22. • Many applicants struggle to prepare a competitive budget request. • > Some people inflate the budget because they are concerned that the funding agency will cut the proposed budget and give them less than they need for their project. • < Other people ask way too little because they think cost-conscious reviewers will be impressed with an extremely low, bare-bones budget proposal – and a lower budget might increase their chances to be awarded the grant. • Neither approach is effective! • Reviewers know what things cost. Too Much or Too Little?
  23. 23. • Include your time as a level of % effort (at MSU), instead of hours or months • Make certain the budget adds up correctly • Put commas in numbers, easier to read (e.g., $1,000) • Use a column format, numbers align on right/at periods • Label all budget categories, leave nothing blank • Be realistic about the time you can commit, if you have 3 projects at 50% time and they are all funded, you’re in trouble! Budget tips
  24. 24. • If you tend to be a cost-conscious person, remember the funder can choose to negotiate costs. • They may draw a line through an item they choose not to fund OR provide partial funding of your total budget request. • In other words, don’t hesitate to let them know what you really need to do the project well! Funder discretion
  25. 25. Although you may prepare the budget last, remember many reviewers look at the budget first! Reviewers
  26. 26. Jane Geever, author of The Foundation Center's Guide to Proposal Writing, conducted interviews with a number of grantmakers and found that many do, in fact, consider the budget to be the best way to get a feel for the project without a lot of verbiage and hype. When asked the question, "How do you usually read a grant request?" here's what some of the respondents said: Reviewers Source: The Foundation Center http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/tutorials/prop_budgt/p bb_review.html
  27. 27. "I look at the budget. Over the years I've learned that narrative can be enriching, but the numbers are stark and straightforward. I want to see that the money is doing the job described in the proposal." Joel Orosz W.K. Kellogg Foundation "How do you usually read a grant request?"
  28. 28. "I skip around the document in the following way: first the budget, to see if the request is appropriate and to see the agency's financials; then the project section, to see what they want to accomplish; then the board list." Lynn Pattillo The Pittulloch Foundation, Inc. "How do you usually read a grant request?"
  29. 29. "I often look at the budget and then read the proposal backwards." Michael Gilligan The Henry Luce Foundation, Inc. "How do you usually read a grant request?"
  30. 30. How to Manage a Grant
  31. 31. Student: Comes up with great idea & application Faculty/Department/College: Assists with application preparation; May fund this great idea or put forth application to larger competition; Dept. may manage smaller awards. IRTL: Assists with application preparation == Larger awards only beyond this point / Faculty research support == • Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP): Pre-award management • Contract and Grant Administration (CGA): Post-award management MSU Grant Management Basics
  32. 32. There are two primary ways to receive most grant awards: 1. Personally / direct 2. Through the university You will likely be taxed on any awards that you receive personally. If run the award through Michigan State University or your department, the university will withhold taxes when necessary. If award is >$25,000, student will be considered in- state for tuition purposes. Income Tax (though we are not tax advisors)
  33. 33. Things to Consider If handled through MSU: • Cannot pay for personal groceries, but can pay for participant food (no matter the funder’s guidelines/approval). • We encourage negotiating the budget up front – there are certain ways to list items in the budget in order to use the funds. • Will be processed with a faculty advisor name, not yours, in order to obtain an account number. • It may take a while. • Must have Human Subjects complete in order to obtain an account number. • Pay will occur like typical graduate student pay checks. • Can charge against your account, even if payments are scheduled installments. If paid directly to student: • You can use the money when you want. • May have to wait for installments. • May need to make arrangements through your department for managing funds.
  34. 34. Sample Budgets
  35. 35. It may be helpful to review examples of budgets and budget descriptions for AAUW, AERA, AIR, Fulbright, NSF, and Spencer IRTL samples & examples: • http://education.msu.edu/irtl/grad/pdf/IRTL_B udgetSamples.pdf Prepare Your Budget
  36. 36. Budget Guidelines - AAUW “Budget – information is required for administrative and U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) purposes. Failure to itemize your budget will result in disqualification. AAUW records are subject to IRS audit and must reflect appropriate planned use of funds.”
  37. 37. There is no specific format for the budget section. Funds may be used for tuition and/or institutional fees, living expenses, equipment, professional travel, books, supplies, computing time, etc. The proposed budget must include travel funds to attend the next AERA Annual Meeting. Budget Guidelines - AERA
  38. 38. Sample Budget – AERA/AIR
  39. 39. • Travel expenses, including excess baggage to and from the residence of the fellow to the host country of research. • Maintenance and dependents allowances based on the cost of living in country(ies) of research for the fellow and his or her dependent(s). • Project allowance for research related expenses such as books, copying, tuition and affiliation fees, local travel and other incidental expenses. • Health and accident insurance premiums. • $100.00 administrative fee to applicant institution. • Dependent allowances should either be for the same time period as the research, or justification included for different timing. • Research assistants (i.e., students at collaborating institutions) are not appropriate for doctoral research. • Transcription of survey responses should be done by the student, no transcribers. • Equipment or materials with a life expectancy beyond the life of the grant are not allowable. Sample Budget - Fulbright
  40. 40. • In general, grants are awarded for up to 24 months. • Funds are to be used exclusively for the necessary expenses incurred in the actual conduct of the dissertation research. • These funds may not be used as a stipend for the student, for tuition, textbooks, journals, or for the typing, reproduction, or publication costs of the student's dissertation. • Although stipends are not permitted, an allowance for expenses during time away from the student's U.S. academic institution may be allowed. • Funds may be requests for research assistants only in special circumstances, which should be carefully justified. Many of the limitations are program specific. • Please consult the relevant program’s website and contact the program assistant or director if necessary. Budget Limitations – NSF Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants
  41. 41. The Graduate School and the college support more than 20 students each year, providing a $6,000 fellowship which allows students to devote considerable time to completing their dissertations. Recipients may hold a maximum of a quarter-time assistantship during the award semester. Doctoral students are notified, via the Ph.D. listserv, of the application process and submission deadlines. Applications are submitted to the student's department in fall (for the upcoming spring or summer), and include one letter of nomination/support from the director of the dissertation that attends to the following: it reaffirms the approval of the proposal, testifies to the dissertation's strengths, and to the likelihood of completion before the end of summer. The letter must include a timeline for completion, with major benchmarks, and should indicate the way in which the award will help release time to complete the dissertation. Budget Guidelines – CoEd Dissertation Completion Fellowships
  42. 42. This fellowship provides financial support for advanced doctoral students who have projected or incurred expenses relevant to data collection for their dissertation or research practicum. Deadline: Typically Oct/Nov, varies by department. Award: $1,000-4,000, varies by department. Allowable research expenses vary by department, but may include: • Testing/validating original survey instruments with focus groups or in cognitive labs • Acquiring a commercially available instrument that will be given to a new population • Providing incentives to schools to encourage participation of faculty, staff, and students (e.g., donation to a library/media center) • Providing direct incentives to interview or survey participants (i.e., gift card to a book store) • Offering refreshments or tokens of appreciation to focus groups (i.e., MSU t-shirts for high school students who participate in focus groups) • Funding postage/mailing/copying costs for hard copy surveys or to purchase an online survey hosting account • Travel to data collection sites • Equipment such as digital recorders or transcription machines • Data entry/transcription labor costs Applicants should include a one-paragraph summary of your project's needs and a detailed budget for anticipated expenses. CoEd Research Practicum / Research Development Fellowship (RP/D)
  43. 43. Resources
  44. 44. IRTL budget preparation: http://education.msu.edu/irtl/grad/budget.asp IRTL budget samples: http://education.msu.edu/irtl/grad/pdf/IRTL_BudgetSamples.pdf GA rates: http://education.msu.edu/resources/documents/Graduate-stipend-rates.pdf GA ranges; Health insurance (MSU HR): http://www.hr.msu.edu/hiring/studentemployment/gradasst/stipendRanges.htm Fringe benefits: https://cga.msu.edu/PL/Portal/DocumentViewer.aspx?cga=aQBkAD0AOQA1AA== MSU tuition calculator: http://ctlr.msu.edu/COStudentAccounts/TuitionCalculator.aspx MSU mileage rates; Per Diem rates: http://ctlr.msu.edu/combp/ex70a.aspx State Department Foreign Per Diem: http://aoprals.state.gov/web920/per_diem.asp MSU current facilities & administrative cost rates: http://www.cga.msu.edu/PL/Portal/DocumentViewer.aspx?cga=aQBkAD0AMQA2ADUA Links from today
  45. 45. • Workshops, sessions for groups and classes • Overview of grants & fellowships; Grant proposal writing; Budget development; RCR; and more! • One-on-one consultation (mdrangst@msu.edu) • in person, over the phone, Skype/FaceTime, email • Web resources (http://education.msu.edu/irtl/grad/) • Sample proposals, budgets, timelines, resources • Monthly newsletters (sign up on our website) • Announcements, workshops, resources, funding opportunities • Facebook updates (facebook.com/MSUIRTL) What does IRTL do?
  46. 46. Please join us for other workshops in this Grants and Fellowships series: How to Write a Competitive Grant Application • Thursday, March 26, 1-3 p.m., 252 Erickson Planning Ahead for 2015-2016 (and Beyond) • Friday, April 10, 1-2 p.m., 252 Erickson Upcoming events
  47. 47. KIN 895 Research Ethics, 1 cr. course, Summer 2015 Identifying and resolving ethical problems in research. Collegial interactions. Authorship, publication, and reviewing practices. Data management. Ownership of data and intellectual property. Conflicts of interest. Protection of human and animal subjects. Lab safety and compliance. • T/W/H May 12-14, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. • Counts toward RCR requirements for 2014-2015 • Interdepartmental course with CEP, EAD, TE. If you wish to have your enrollment in this course appear on your record as CEP 895 or EAD 895 or TE 895, enroll in this section and then contact the CEP or EAD or TE department when this class is completed. Upcoming events
  48. 48. • Workshop topic ideas • Web and newsletter content suggestions • New award information • Updates on your grant/fellowship applications • Corrections on typos, spelling, and grammar. We are always excited for
  49. 49. Institute for Research on Teaching and Learning 2nd Floor, Erickson Hall http://education.msu.edu/irtl/grad https://www.facebook.com/MSUIRTL http://education.msu.edu/irtl/grad/Subscribe.asp Bob Floden, Director, floden@msu.edu Marcy Wallace, Associate Director, wallacem@msu.edu Megan Drangstveit, Graduate Assistant, mdrangst@msu.edu (201C Erickson Hall) IRTL – Doctoral Student Research Support

×