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Interactive storytelling in video games

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Many video games let players create their own, unique stories and adventures. Alasdair Gray explores some of the techniques that game designers are using to create these experiences, and what we can learn from them.

Published in: Marketing
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Interactive storytelling in video games

  1. 1. 1 1 Confidential © 2014 Under the influence
  2. 2. 2 2 Confidential © 2014
  3. 3. 3 3 Confidential © 2014 Game narratives are often understood to be predetermined story chunks interspersed with gameplay. What is interactive storytelling? This is a story you interact with, not interactive storytelling.
  4. 4. 4 4 Confidential © 2014 Interactive storytelling is where the narrative and its evolution can be influenced in real time by the user.
  5. 5. 5 5 Confidential © 2014 It risks being overlooked
  6. 6. 6 6 Confidential © 2014 Why is it important for us?
  7. 7. 7 7 Confidential © 2014 5 Example Methods
  8. 8. 8 8 Confidential © 2014 1. Build an interactive narrative
  9. 9. 9 9 Confidential © 2014 Games example: morality systems
  10. 10. 10 10 Confidential © 2014 1. A situation 2. A choice 3. A result It’s possible to achieve simply.
  11. 11. 11 11 Confidential © 2014 You don’t have to build it from scratch +
  12. 12. 12 12 Confidential © 2014 Where else could we build interactive narratives? [Enable captions] ‘Don’t listen. It’s all lies!’
  13. 13. 13 13 Confidential © 2014 2. Be repetitive
  14. 14. 14 14 Confidential © 2014 Making games is a long and costly process
  15. 15. 15 15 Confidential © 2014 ‘Replay’ can be a narrative device
  16. 16. 16 16 Confidential © 2014 And it’s not just in indie games
  17. 17. 17 17 Confidential © 2014 Could we send our audience back to the start for a different experience?
  18. 18. 18 18 Confidential © 2014 3. Make their data the ending
  19. 19. 19 19 Confidential © 2014
  20. 20. 20 20 Confidential © 2014 Surprise, you’ve been monitored!
  21. 21. 21 21 Confidential © 2014 Psst… It needs to be a secret Black and White 1 Black and White 2 Hidden data = creature training Visible data = creature programming
  22. 22. 22 22 Confidential © 2014 Can we use audience data to tell them their own personal story?
  23. 23. 23 23 Confidential © 2014 4. Narrate the user
  24. 24. 24 24 Confidential © 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RTkUgov60g
  25. 25. 25 25 Confidential © 2014 User actions can trigger story elements
  26. 26. 26 26 Confidential © 2014 In another setting, the narration is commentary
  27. 27. 27 27 Confidential © 2014 Can we turn existing behaviours into narrative triggers?
  28. 28. 28 28 Confidential © 2014 5. Manipulate user communication
  29. 29. 29 29 Confidential © 2014 Online games are plagued by trolls
  30. 30. 30 30 Confidential © 2014 Their solution: moderate user language
  31. 31. 31 31 Confidential © 2014
  32. 32. 32 32 Confidential © 2014 Turning Player Communication into narrative design
  33. 33. 33 33 Confidential © 2014 Then you meet the full cast
  34. 34. 34 34 Confidential © 2014 Can we consider another tone of voice? Through designing user communications: e.g. How do we want our audience members to appear to each other?
  35. 35. 35 35 Confidential © 2014 In summary
  36. 36. 36 36 Confidential © 2014 @AlasdairGray

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