WHAT IS IRD?
• A non-profit humanitarian organization that works on the
continuum of relief to development, specializing i...
WHAT HAVE WE ACCOMPLISHED
SINCE 1998?
• Assisted more than 100 million people
• Implemented more than 100 programs
• Opera...
PRIMARY DONORS
• U.S. Agency for International Development
(USAID)
• U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
• U.S. Departme...
Programs:
Afghanistan
Armenia
Azerbaijan
Bangladesh
Cambodia
Cameroon
Chad
Colombia
Cuba
Ethiopia
The Gambia
Georgia
Haiti...
PROGRAM SECTORS
Democracy and
Governance
Sustainable Food
and Agriculture
Systems
Infrastructure
Health
Community
Stabiliz...
The IRD Approach: Sustainable
Food and Agriculture Systems
• Value Chain Development (input suppliers,
producers, processo...
AGRICULTURE DEVELOPMENT
• Vouchers for Purchase of Inputs and
Equipment
• Development of Producers Associations
• Regional...
ZIMBABWE:
Restoring
livelihoods by
strengthening the
value chain of
smallholder
peanut farmers
(REVALUE)
GAMBIA,
SENEGAL
and GUINEA-
BISSAU:
Raising
incomes
through
cashew
production
MALI:
Working
with small
holders to
improve
sesame
value chain
MOZAMBIQUE:
Promoting
local seed
nurseries to
increase
vegetable
production
FOOD AID & NUTRITION
• Assistance to Refugees and Returnees
• Nutrition Education
• School Feeding
• Development of Fortif...
CAMEROON:
Distributing
seeds and
farming
equipment to
refugees
from Central
African
Republic
CAMBODIA:
Nutrition
education for
pregnant and
lactating
mothers
LAOS:
Utilizing
donated
food to
provide
nutritious
meals for
school
children
INDONESIA:
Working
with the
private
sector to
produce
fortified
food
products
CAMEROON:
Replicating a
successful
public-private
partnership
in Africa
Combine provided
through CRDA, Serbia
IMPROVING
LIVES
BUILDING
LIVELIHOODS
David Prettyman, Deputy Director
Sustainable Food and Agriculture Systems
dprettyman@ird-dc.org
IRD
1621 North Kent Street...
IRD Presentation at the 2010 International Food Aid & Development Conference
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IRD Presentation at the 2010 International Food Aid & Development Conference

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David Prettyman, IRD's Deputy Director of Sustainable Food and Agriculture Systems, presented at the 2010 International Food Aid and Development Conference on Tuesday, August 3. Prettyman discussed IRD's work in long-term agriculture and food assistance projects, including programs in Cameroon, the Gambia, Senegal, Guinea-Bissau, and Mozambique.

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  • What is IRD?
    IRD is a non-profit humanitarian organization that works on the continuum of relief to development, specializing in conflict and post-conflict situations.
    IRD uses a community-based approach, which allows rapid response and greater scalability of its projects.
    IRD tends to be more technically oriented than most non-profits. At the same time, IRD is more community-based than most for-profits.
    IRD is very adept at transitioning programs from relief to stabilization to development.
  • IRD was founded in 1998. Since then we have:
    Assisted more than 100 million people, implemented more than 100 highly successful projects, and delivered nearly $2 billion in aid.
    Currently, IRD is operating in 40 countries on five continents. To manage and implement its programs, IRD employs more than 3,000 staff worldwide.
  • IRD’s donors include:
    The US Agency for International Development, which provides funding through the Food for Peace Program and the Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance, as well as a number of local and regional missions.
    IRD also receives extensive funding from the US Department of Agriculture through the Food for Progress and McGovern-Dole Food for Education funding mechanisms.
    Other major donors include the US Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration and various UN organizations including the World Food Program, UNDP, Unicef and OCHA.
    IRD receives gift-in-kind assistance from LDS Charities and other faith-based organizations. We also receive funding from bi-lateral and multi-lateral donors such as DfiD, CIDA and the World Bank.
  • IRD is currently operational in 40 countries. Our largest programs can be found in Afghanistan, Iraq and the Balkans. We also have major programs in Southeast Asia and, of course, Africa, which has become the focus of IRD’s Agriculture Development and Food Aid efforts.
  • IRD implements programs in six sectors:
    Democracy and governance,
    Community stabilization,
    Relief and humanitarian aid,
    Health,
    Infrastructure, and
    Sustainable food and agriculture systems
  • The IRD approach to agriculture development focuses on the value chain, which we define as the full range of activities and services required to bring a product to the market.
    IRD also places great emphasis on developing private sector linkages, building local capacity for sustainability, and, in keeping with the theme of this conference, partnerships.
  • IRD utilizes a number of strategies in support of its agriculture development objectives. These activities include, but are not limited to:
    Providing vouchers for the purchase of agricultural inputs and equipment;
    Facilitating the development of producers’ associations;
    Focusing on the value chain for products with regional as well as local markets; and
    Promoting sustainable development through conservation agriculture.
  • In Zimbabwe, through the USAID-funded REVALUE project, IRD is providing vouchers to smallholder peanut farmers for the purchase of seeds and other inputs.
  • In the Gambia, Senegal and Guinea-Bissau, IRD is implementing a USDA-funded Food for Progress project that is raising incomes by facilitating the development of local and regional cashew producers associations.
  • In Mali, IRD is improving the value chain for sesame, an important agriculture commodity with an extensive regional market throughout West Africa. This project is also funded by USDA.
  • In Mozambique, with funding from the Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance, IRD is promoting conservation agriculture and developing seed nurseries to increase vegetable production in the flood-prone Zambezi River Delta region.
  • In addition to agriculture development, IRD has extensive food aid and nutrition programs. These programs focus on:
    Assistance to refugees, internally displaced persons and returnees,
    Nutrition education,
    School feeding, and
    The development of fortified food products.
  • In Cameroon, IRD has funding from the US Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration to provide assistance in the form of seeds and farming equipment to refugees from the Central African Republic.
  • In Cambodia, USAID is funding a maternal and child health program that includes nutrition education for pregnant and lactating mothers. The beneficiaries of this program are from many of the same households that benefit also from IRD’s USDA-funded Food for Education project.
  • In Laos, IRD is collaborating with the Humpty Dumpty Institute in an effort to make education safer for children by clearing unexploded ordinance from school playgrounds. This project, which is being implemented in an area of the country heavily bombed during the Indochina War, utilizes commodities donated by USDA and USAID to provide nutritious meals for 60,000 school children.
  • Anyone who knows ME will not be surprised to see this photo of a package of noodles. With funding from USDA, in Indonesia IRD collaborated with the American Soybean Association and US Wheat Associates to develop and introduce a soy-enriched, vitamin-fortified noodle that has been marketed through private sector channels and also distributed through various food aid programs. With USDA support, this program was successfully replicated in Cambodia.
  • As you heard this morning, IRD’s noodle program has inspired a local entrepreneur in Cameroon, Mr. Ahmadou Baba, to build a noodle factory of his own. If everything goes according to plan, this factory will begin producing soy-enriched, vitamin-fortified noodles by the end of this year. I encourage anyone who is interested in supporting a true private-public partnership to meet with Ahmadou, learn more about this initiative, and place your order for a shipment of noodles today!
  • In conclusion, since 1998, IRD has been working hard to improve the lives of the world’s most vulnerable groups.
  • By forging partnerships that build livelihoods, IRD is providing the tools and resources needed to guarantee self-sufficiency for generations to come.
  • Thank you very much for your attention.
    If you would like more information about IRD, there are some brochures on the table in the back of this room.
    I would also be happy to answer any questions or to speak individually after this session is over.
    Thank you very much.
  • IRD Presentation at the 2010 International Food Aid & Development Conference

    1. 1. WHAT IS IRD? • A non-profit humanitarian organization that works on the continuum of relief to development, specializing in conflict and post-conflict settings. • Community-based approach allows more rapid response and greater scalability of projects. • More technically-oriented than most non-profits and more community-based than most for-profits. • Adept at transitioning programs from relief to stabilization to development.
    2. 2. WHAT HAVE WE ACCOMPLISHED SINCE 1998? • Assisted more than 100 million people • Implemented more than 100 programs • Operating in 40 countries • Over $1.75 billion in aid • More than 3,000 employees globally
    3. 3. PRIMARY DONORS • U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) • U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) • U.S. Department of State (DOS) • United Nations • Church of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) • U.K. Department for International Development (DfID) • Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)
    4. 4. Programs: Afghanistan Armenia Azerbaijan Bangladesh Cambodia Cameroon Chad Colombia Cuba Ethiopia The Gambia Georgia Haiti Honduras Indonesia Iraq Jordan Kosovo Laos Lebanon Liberia Mali WHERE WE WORK Mauritania Montenegro Mozambique Nepal Niger Pakistan Senegal Serbia Sri Lanka Sudan Swaziland United States Ukraine West Bank/Gaza Yemen Zimbabwe Shipments: Benin Kenya Philippines Vietnam
    5. 5. PROGRAM SECTORS Democracy and Governance Sustainable Food and Agriculture Systems Infrastructure Health Community Stabilization Relief & Humanitarian Aid
    6. 6. The IRD Approach: Sustainable Food and Agriculture Systems • Value Chain Development (input suppliers, producers, processors, financing, marketing) • Private Sector Linkages • Capacity Building for Sustainability • Partnerships
    7. 7. AGRICULTURE DEVELOPMENT • Vouchers for Purchase of Inputs and Equipment • Development of Producers Associations • Regional Markets • Conservation Agriculture
    8. 8. ZIMBABWE: Restoring livelihoods by strengthening the value chain of smallholder peanut farmers (REVALUE)
    9. 9. GAMBIA, SENEGAL and GUINEA- BISSAU: Raising incomes through cashew production
    10. 10. MALI: Working with small holders to improve sesame value chain
    11. 11. MOZAMBIQUE: Promoting local seed nurseries to increase vegetable production
    12. 12. FOOD AID & NUTRITION • Assistance to Refugees and Returnees • Nutrition Education • School Feeding • Development of Fortified Food Products
    13. 13. CAMEROON: Distributing seeds and farming equipment to refugees from Central African Republic
    14. 14. CAMBODIA: Nutrition education for pregnant and lactating mothers
    15. 15. LAOS: Utilizing donated food to provide nutritious meals for school children
    16. 16. INDONESIA: Working with the private sector to produce fortified food products
    17. 17. CAMEROON: Replicating a successful public-private partnership in Africa
    18. 18. Combine provided through CRDA, Serbia IMPROVING LIVES
    19. 19. BUILDING LIVELIHOODS
    20. 20. David Prettyman, Deputy Director Sustainable Food and Agriculture Systems dprettyman@ird-dc.org IRD 1621 North Kent Street Suite 400 Arlington, VA 22209 703-248-0161 www.ird.org

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