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WASH and IWRM

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WASH and IWRM
IRC – Debate 22 November 2017
Pim van der Male -IGG

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Linking WASH and IWRM, Why?

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Linking WASH and IWRM, Why?
• Sustainability!
• SDG 6
• WASH strategy 2017-2030
 Long term resource availability
 Protec...

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WASH and IWRM

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Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) should be linked to integrated water resources management (IWM). First because water quality/quantity for WASH is dependent on water resources management and secondly because sanitation service waste can pollute water resources. Linking WASH and IWRM is needed to ensure sustainable WASH services. WASH/IWRM linkages are an integral part of Sustainable Development Goal 6 (SDG6) and of the new WASH strategy of the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Addressing these linkages from a narrow problem-based perspective seem most feasible but they can also be addressed within the wider, holistic context of a catchment or a landscape approach. There are examples of both approaches in Dutch-funded projects in Ethiopia (narrow perspective) and in Mozambique and Tanzania (holistic perspective). The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is promoting improved WASH/IWRM linkages through awareness raising, rolling out sustainability tools, integration in proposals, and improving access to analytical tools and financial mechanisms. Presentation by Pim van der Male, Netherlands Minsitry of Foreign Affairs, given at the IRC WASH Debate: Linking WASH and IWRM programmes to achieve SDG6, 22 November 2017, The Hague, The Netherlands.

Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) should be linked to integrated water resources management (IWM). First because water quality/quantity for WASH is dependent on water resources management and secondly because sanitation service waste can pollute water resources. Linking WASH and IWRM is needed to ensure sustainable WASH services. WASH/IWRM linkages are an integral part of Sustainable Development Goal 6 (SDG6) and of the new WASH strategy of the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Addressing these linkages from a narrow problem-based perspective seem most feasible but they can also be addressed within the wider, holistic context of a catchment or a landscape approach. There are examples of both approaches in Dutch-funded projects in Ethiopia (narrow perspective) and in Mozambique and Tanzania (holistic perspective). The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is promoting improved WASH/IWRM linkages through awareness raising, rolling out sustainability tools, integration in proposals, and improving access to analytical tools and financial mechanisms. Presentation by Pim van der Male, Netherlands Minsitry of Foreign Affairs, given at the IRC WASH Debate: Linking WASH and IWRM programmes to achieve SDG6, 22 November 2017, The Hague, The Netherlands.

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WASH and IWRM

  1. 1. WASH and IWRM IRC – Debate 22 November 2017 Pim van der Male -IGG
  2. 2. Linking WASH and IWRM, Why?
  3. 3. Linking WASH and IWRM, Why? • Sustainability! • SDG 6 • WASH strategy 2017-2030  Long term resource availability  Protection of ecosystems from pollution and depletion  Taking into consideration claims of other water users (e.g. agriculture.)
  4. 4. Linking WASH and IWRM, how ? • Narrow: • Holistic: WASH IWRM WASH IWRM landscape
  5. 5. Linking WASH and IWRM, how, how better ? • Raising awareness/Documenting and sharing experiences • Further roll out sustainability tools and M&E requirements. • Integration in assessment of proposals (FDW) • Improve access to analytical tools • Improve access to budget for retrofitting programmes. • Integrate in BeMo and Q@E process?
  6. 6. Thank you!

Editor's Notes

  • Two examples to illustrate the case:

    one where WASH services (quantity and quality) are vulnerable to issues related to Water Management (planned mining activities in Atwa, main source for Accra)

    and one (from Holland) to show that WASH contributes to pollution and has a role to play in the context of IWRM. Amsterdam 19th century canals heavily polluted, Sarphati with collection, 110 years later queen swims in canal.
  • Remember previous slide: Water quality/quantity for WASH dependent on water resouces management AND WASH can be a pollutant:

    In fact: FIETS is sustainability framework for WASH and E (ecological sustainability) is all about climate change adaptation and ensuring WASH services do not pollute or deplete scarce resources important for others water users and ecosystems.

    Linking IWRM and WASH can also help in the I and S for sustainability: establishing user/stakeholder platforms for negotiations and seeking solutions for problems.

    Of course this is informed by SDG 6 which gives us a broader water framework for our programmes

    Our new strategy is pegged to the SDGs and link IWRM directly to the aim for sustainability and SDG 6 .

  • How to approach integration,?
    Different variations can be identified from current programmes.
    Depend on type of issues at hand and main objectives of programmes involved.

    Narrow; work on areas where WASH and IWRM interface (can be both ways e.g. main objective WASH, or IWRM), problem oriented (short-medium term), limited number of stakeholders directly involved in solving the issue.
    Case: VEI Source to tap and back and Harar case. Entry point water supply/sanitation to Adama and Addis Ababa and Harar . Identified issues around drought and source protection. Extra efforts related to water management but in context of WASH and set up stakeholder consultation structure and concrete measures to protect sources (eg checkdams to prevent erosion and sedimentation of water source.

    Narrow approach does help to keep things concrete and doable, also in short run.
    Suitable for ‘retrofitting’ once issues arise and need to be addressed. Trigger: disaster/acute pressure

    Holistic integrate WASH as one of the stakeholders in broader approaches (IWRM-catchment management or even wider: Landscape approaches. main objective much wider than just WASH) – Suitable when programming from scratch. Backed by policy framework., Process oriented, many more stakeholders (complex often multisectoral integration) , in case of Sustain notably the private sector, longer term, Examples:

    Sustain/IUCN: Growth corridors (Zambezi Mozambique, Kilombero Tanzania:

    Green Economic Growth through its SUSTAIN programme that focuses on sustainable and climate smart agriculture and on equitable and eco-responsible water resources use and governance, working with local farmers, governments, civil society and private sector.

    Either Narrow or wide are fine and need to be promoted, when local conditions demand. Most feasible seems the narrow approach. With good options for quick wins and retrofitting to resolve sustainability issues while programmes are on-going.

    Atewa?? Where does it fit? Does it fit? Does it have to fit?

  • So what are we doing to walk the talk of our new WASH strategy.

    Remember canvas? These examples are mainly on our what we can do in the area of programming and finance at the level of

    Raising awareness/documenting/sharing experiences: Webinar (collaboration with watershed partnership), Water specialists retreat.
    Turns out a lot is happening in the field, exchange of experiences is minimal.
    Detail strategy based on this process and develop a ‘menu of options’ (canvas) for staff.
    Triggers: identified: 1. the occurring of specific emergencies or events like a flood. 2. the adoption of new policies which forces integration to happen. 3. realisation of poor water resources sustainability affecting WASH and IWRM plans. Moreover, the importance of evidence and data for integration solutions was discussed during this session.

    Sustainability tools (Check): Water quality, continuity, Source protection): further roll out.

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