Asia Regional Sanitation and Hygiene Practitioners Workshop       Dhaka, Bangladesh (31st January-2nd February, 2012)     ...
BRAC WASH Iprogrammeintervention in 150 of482 upazilas                         www.brac.net
• Reasons for selecting the intervention upazilas  - Poor sanitation coverage  - High poverty rate  - Arsenic contaminatio...
Study focus•   Operational approaches of the programme to    facilitate water, sanitation and hygiene targets•   Change in...
Operational approachesCore approaches                                            Drawing social map• Formation of Village ...
Study sampleQuantitative• 30,000 households randomly selected from 50   upazilas to assess sanitation coverage and   water...
Some results:water safety practices                         www.brac.net
Ownership of sanitary latrines by economic                  status                                       www.brac.net
Transition of sanitary latrine users (2007 - 2011)• 73.3% of the HHs using sanitary latrines in 2007 continued  the practi...
Water-related disease prevalence                               www.brac.net
Conclusions• Hygiene behaviour about household water safety practices  improved, but sustainability is an issue• Ownership...
Thank you            www.brac.net
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The BRAC WASH Programme: Describing the core operational approaches, monitoring, evaluation and some results

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The BRAC WASH Programme: Describing the core operational approaches, monitoring, evaluation and some results

  1. 1. Asia Regional Sanitation and Hygiene Practitioners Workshop Dhaka, Bangladesh (31st January-2nd February, 2012) The BRAC WASH programme:Core operational approaches, monitoring, evaluation and some results Fazlul Karim, Tahera Akter, Nepal C Dey, Milan K Barua RED & WASH Programme, BRAC www.brac.net
  2. 2. BRAC WASH Iprogrammeintervention in 150 of482 upazilas www.brac.net
  3. 3. • Reasons for selecting the intervention upazilas - Poor sanitation coverage - High poverty rate - Arsenic contamination in ground water• Phase 1 (50 upazilas): 2.74 million HHs• Phase 2 (50 upazilas): 2.68 million HHs• Phase 3 (50 upazilas): 2.64 million HHs www.brac.net
  4. 4. Study focus• Operational approaches of the programme to facilitate water, sanitation and hygiene targets• Change in water safety practices, sanitation and self-reported water-related disease prevalence at household level www.brac.net
  5. 5. Operational approachesCore approaches Drawing social map• Formation of Village WASH Committee (VWC)• Capacity building of stakeholders• Diffusion approach to inform WASH Cluster meeting messages• School sanitation and hygiene educationOther approaches Demonstration of• Programme component-specific (e.g. hand washing water, sanitation and hygiene)• Quality control School sanitation www.brac.net
  6. 6. Study sampleQuantitative• 30,000 households randomly selected from 50 upazilas to assess sanitation coverage and water-related disease prevalence•6,600 households randomly selected from 11upazilas to assess water safety practicesData collection tools•Household questionnaire and spot checks www.brac.net
  7. 7. Some results:water safety practices www.brac.net
  8. 8. Ownership of sanitary latrines by economic status www.brac.net
  9. 9. Transition of sanitary latrine users (2007 - 2011)• 73.3% of the HHs using sanitary latrines in 2007 continued the practice in 2011• 19.6% of them removed water seal from the latrines• 7.1% of them shifted to other unsanitary practices, e.g., open defecation, pit latrines, etc.Transition of unsanitary latrine users (2007 -2011)• 52.4% of latrines without water seal converted to sanitary latrines through water seal installation• 46.5% of unsanitary latrines converted to sanitary latrines www.brac.net
  10. 10. Water-related disease prevalence www.brac.net
  11. 11. Conclusions• Hygiene behaviour about household water safety practices improved, but sustainability is an issue• Ownership of sanitary latrines increased across the economic groups, while major changes happened in the ultra poor• Shift to sanitary latrines was higher than shift to unsanitary practices, but removal of water seals still remains a challenge• Prevalence of water-related diseases reduced in all groups, but reported diseases among children under-five was relatively higher www.brac.net
  12. 12. Thank you www.brac.net

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