The Methods and Benefits of Staining in the Microscopy of Consumer Products Presented by: Tom Kremer Technical Leader of M...
 
 
DuPont Fiber Identification Stain No. 4 <ul><li>Acid Blue 298 </li></ul><ul><li>Acid Red 182 </li></ul><ul><li>Direct Blue...
Color Reactions <ul><li>Nylon – red to reddish brown </li></ul><ul><li>Rayon – blue to blue-green </li></ul><ul><li>Cellul...
Color Reactions (contd.) <ul><li>Wood pulp (chemically treated) – green </li></ul><ul><li>Wood pulp (mechanical) – red </l...
Color Reactions <ul><li>S/B latex – red </li></ul><ul><li>Polystyrene acrylate – yellow-gold </li></ul><ul><li>Ethylene vi...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
“ Specifically, it has been attempted to produce disposable fibrous products which maintain a relatively high wet strength...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Osmium Tetroxide Vapor Staining
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Methods and benefits of staining for microscopy

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In the manufacturing process for disposable tissue and sanitary products, a wide variety of additives are commonly used for several purposes.

Additives are used in products to maintain, lose or gain strength, hold dissimilar parts together, offer moisturizer and softness, or even to absorb moisture and odors.

The aforementioned additives are typically not visible to the naked eye or, in many cases, even under the microscope. Therefore, it is necessary to render them visible.

Specific fiber stains have been extremely instrumental in identifying the physical structures of these products in product development and problem solving.


Tom Kremer, our technical leader of microscopy, recently presented at McCrone Research Institute's 2010 Inter/Micro conference about how stains can help identify consumer product problems.

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Methods and benefits of staining for microscopy

  1. 1. The Methods and Benefits of Staining in the Microscopy of Consumer Products Presented by: Tom Kremer Technical Leader of Microscopy
  2. 4. DuPont Fiber Identification Stain No. 4 <ul><li>Acid Blue 298 </li></ul><ul><li>Acid Red 182 </li></ul><ul><li>Direct Blue 218 </li></ul><ul><li>Disperse Orange 25 </li></ul><ul><li>Disperse Yellow 3 </li></ul>
  3. 5. Color Reactions <ul><li>Nylon – red to reddish brown </li></ul><ul><li>Rayon – blue to blue-green </li></ul><ul><li>Cellulose acetate – orange </li></ul><ul><li>Polyester – pale yellow/yellow tan/beige </li></ul><ul><li>Acrylic – beige </li></ul><ul><li>Olefin – light tan to pale yellow </li></ul>
  4. 6. Color Reactions (contd.) <ul><li>Wood pulp (chemically treated) – green </li></ul><ul><li>Wood pulp (mechanical) – red </li></ul><ul><li>Cotton (normal) – strong blue to blue-gray </li></ul><ul><li>Cotton (mercerized) – green </li></ul><ul><li>Glass – doesn’t stain </li></ul><ul><li>Silk – dark purple </li></ul>
  5. 7. Color Reactions <ul><li>S/B latex – red </li></ul><ul><li>Polystyrene acrylate – yellow-gold </li></ul><ul><li>Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) – pale yellow </li></ul><ul><li>Polyvinyl acetate (PVA) – red </li></ul>
  6. 15. “ Specifically, it has been attempted to produce disposable fibrous products which maintain a relatively high wet strength in the presence of solutions with elevated ion concentrations, but become more dispersible when in contact with solutions having a lower ion concentration. These ion sensitive, water dispersible polymer formulations are well known in the art.
  7. 29. Osmium Tetroxide Vapor Staining

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