Journalism and diversity of audience                    Verica Rupar    Cardiff University and Media Diversity Institute
EU and fundamental rights              framework• Action grant: actions aimed at fighting traditional  and new stereotypes...
EJI project• Journalistic sector is a vehicle to public conversation  and civic action• Denmark, Slovakia, Lithuania, Ital...
Who they are?• White, male,  mainstream…not always• Don’t feel strongly about  their ethnic and religious  background• Soc...
Norms and practice• Journalists declare their dedication to values of  objectivity, unbiased reporting, promotion of  plur...
What they know?• Awareness of general principles• Legislation better known in new member states• EU Charter on fundamental...
But…• “We are not racists, we support Greek citizens”  (Greece)• “People don’t care about successful integration  stories”...
How they do it (successfully)?• New forms of community engagement (UK)• Revival of undercover reporting (Germany,  Lithuan...
• Italy: The migration has been largely emphasized by  the media. They talked about biblical exodus,  millions of migrants...
Changes• Journalism training and education  (workshops, inclusive curriculum)• Improving newsroom diversity• CSOs, Interns...
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Journalism and diversity of audience by Verica Rupar (Cardiff University and Media Diversity Institute)

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Journalism and diversity of audience by Verica Rupar (Cardiff University and Media Diversity Institute). In Other Words Conference in Mantova. Read more about the European project at: www.inotherwords-project.eu

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Journalism and diversity of audience by Verica Rupar (Cardiff University and Media Diversity Institute)

  1. 1. Journalism and diversity of audience Verica Rupar Cardiff University and Media Diversity Institute
  2. 2. EU and fundamental rights framework• Action grant: actions aimed at fighting traditional and new stereotypes whose diffusion are at the roots of racist attitudes and speech, discriminatory action and violent incidents.• IFJ, Article 19 and MDI: Ethical journalism initiative: Campaign to fight racism and discrimination through the highest professional standards of journalism• 2 studies on media, ethnicity/religion and the EU fundamental rights framework
  3. 3. EJI project• Journalistic sector is a vehicle to public conversation and civic action• Denmark, Slovakia, Lithuania, Italy, the UK, Hungary, Greece, France and Germany• Interviews with journalists and case studies:• Who they are? (demographics and norms)• What they know? (awareness of anti-discriminatory legislation)• How they do it? (case studies)• How it can be improved to breakdown prejudices, tackle discrimination, endorse common values and provide independent and trustworthy information?
  4. 4. Who they are?• White, male, mainstream…not always• Don’t feel strongly about their ethnic and religious background• Social sciences background• General and crime reporters• Journalism culture comparisons
  5. 5. Norms and practice• Journalists declare their dedication to values of objectivity, unbiased reporting, promotion of plurality, democracy and civic society when reporting about ethnicity, while at the same time they all admit that media further negative stereotypes about ethnic minorities
  6. 6. What they know?• Awareness of general principles• Legislation better known in new member states• EU Charter on fundamental rights: Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited
  7. 7. But…• “We are not racists, we support Greek citizens” (Greece)• “People don’t care about successful integration stories” (Italy)• No religious background unless relevant, but OK to use term “Muslim gangs” (France)• “We have a church journalist and an integration journalist and a religious reporter reporting on other denominations than the Lutheran Church” (Denmark)
  8. 8. How they do it (successfully)?• New forms of community engagement (UK)• Revival of undercover reporting (Germany, Lithuania, Denmark, France…)• Special supplements (Nuovi Italiani)• “We believe individual stories of people for people are the most effective tool to raise awareness on these issues” (France)
  9. 9. • Italy: The migration has been largely emphasized by the media. They talked about biblical exodus, millions of migrants landing into the country. Actually until now twenty thousand migrants have landed in Lampedusa, a number Italy can cope with no problem. There has been no Exodus whatsoever. So what we did there: we told and showed people about the awful welcome we gave these migrants, which was not Lampedusa inhabitants fault at all, it was all about wrong governmental policies• Denmark: Religion is not so much a matter of facts as it is a matter of what people think and believe, and what interpretations they make, and in the religious field people cannot always asked to document their interpretations or beliefs, so yes, it is quite tough, when it comes to religion.”
  10. 10. Changes• Journalism training and education (workshops, inclusive curriculum)• Improving newsroom diversity• CSOs, Internship programs• Encouraging professional reflexivity (public editors, newsroom guests, awards…)• Journalism practice: method, account, approach

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