2003 18th idf

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2003 18th idf

  1. 1. Insulin-resistance in overweight women with breast cancer: effect of cytokines and body weight, before and after successful chemotherapy.E. Chala1, C. Manes2, H. Iliades3, G. Skaragkas2, D. Mouratidou3 and E. Kapantais11: Dep.Diabetes-Obesity-Metabolism, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens - Greece2: Diabetes Center, Papageorgiou Hospital, Thessaloniki - Greece3: 3rd Dep. Clinical. Oncology, Theagenio Hospital, Thessaloniki - Greece
  2. 2. Introduction: Malignancy is known to be an insulin-resistant state, possibly attributed to the action of multiple cytokines. Moreover, insulin resistance (IR) is a well-known condition in overweight persons, especially those with central obesity. Aim:To explore insulin resistance (IR), as well as certain growth factors and cytokinelevels, in women suffering from breast cancer and to possibly prove:a) their relationship with anthropometric measurements, BMI in particular, andb) the change in IR when these patients are successfully treated.
  3. 3. Methods: 11 not (known) diabetic women, with stage IV breast cancer (hepaticmetastases excluded), age 62.458.43, BMI 28.262.74, and 4 controls (BMI30.865.51) were subjected to weight and height measurements for calculationof BMI, and OGTT with 75gr glucose. Blood glucose levels as well as insulin, leptin, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α,PDGF, VEGF and IGF-1 were measured before and 120 minutes after glucoseadministration. IR and β-cell function were calculated using HOMA method. Patients were subjected to the same measurements after 6 cycles ofsuccessful chemotherapy. Statistics included simple and paired t-test, Wilcoxon test, parametric andnon-parametric correlation (r Pearson and r Spearman), multiple regressionanalysis and ANOVA for two-way interactions. Calculations were carried outusing SPSS statistical package version 11.5. Results were consideredsignificant when p<0.05.
  4. 4. Results:
  5. 5. 12,50 10,00 IR-HOMA 7,50 5,00 2,50 control patient (p=0.032)Patients were found to be more insulin resistant than controls: (7.623.15 vs. 3.162.64, p=0.032)
  6. 6. 250 200 150 100 50 insulin 0΄ 0 insulin 120΄ control patient insulin 0΄: p=0.037 - insulin 120΄: p=0.009Patients had higher insulin levels than controls both before and after glucose administration (23.35  8.93 vs. 13.55  10.27, p=0.037 and 160.28  81.30 vs. 36.19  26.50, p=0.009, respectively)
  7. 7. OGTT hadhadgreater insulin response OGTT a a greater insulin response in patients than in controls (p=0.016) in patients than in controls (p=0.016) 180 120Mean Insulin levels case 60 control 0 patient before glucose 120΄ after glucose OGTT R square=60.4,F=15.766, sig=0.000 R square=60.4, F=15.766, Sig=0.000 Case: p=0.003, OGTT: p=0.001, case x OGTT: p=0.016 p=0.016 case: p=0.003, OGTT: p=0.001, case x OGTT:
  8. 8. 2,4 2,0 1,6 1,2 ,8 ,4 IL-1, OGTT: 0΄IL.1 0,0 IL-1, OGTT: 120΄ control patient (IL-1 0΄ : p=0.056, IL-1 120΄: p=0.031) casePatients had higher interleukin-1 levels, than controls especially after glucose administration
  9. 9. 8 6 4 2 interleukin-6 0΄ 0 interleukin-6 120΄ control patient (IL-6 0΄: p=0.047 - IL-6 120΄ : p=0.047) (IL-6 0΄: p=0.047 IL-6 120΄: p=0.047)Patients had higher interleukin-6 levels than controls both before and after glucose administration
  10. 10. before OGTT 120 minutes after OGTT 182 150   100   105 50   28 25 0       before chemotherapy after 6 months of chemotherapy before chemotherapy after 6 months of chemotherapyIn patients, after 6 months of chemotherapy, insulin levels 120΄ were statistically lower (111.75  76.19 vs.170.39 78.07mU/ml, p=0.037), while no difference was noticed in insulin levels 0΄.
  11. 11. before OGTT 120 minutes after OGTT 4,00   3,00   2,00   1,00   0,00       before chemotherapy before chemotherapy after 6 months of chemotherapy after 6 months of chemotherapyIn patients, neither time 0΄, nor time 120΄ IL-1 levels differed significantly before and after successful chemotherapy.
  12. 12. before OGTT 120 minutes after OGTT 6,00   4,00   2,00   0,00       before chemotherapy before chemotherapy after 6 months of chemotherapy after 6 months of chemotherapyIn patients, neither time 0΄, nor time 120΄ IL-6 levels differed significantly before and after successful chemotherapy.
  13. 13. be fo re ch e m othe ra p y a fte r 6 m o nths o f ch e m othe ra pyArea under the curve of insulin according to different BMI tertiles, before and after six months of chemotherapy
  14. 14. Insulin response to OGTT and BMI: a) before and b) after chemotherapy be fore chemothe ra py af ter 6 months of che mothe rapy  300  R-Square = 0,27  (p=0.125) R-Square = 0,50 (p=0.022)    200Insul in            100          0             26 28 30 32 34 26 28 30 32 34 BM I BM I Multiple regression: Multiple regression:(R square=69.8, F=5.385, Sig=0.031) (R square=90.2, F=11.44, Sig=0.010) Beta for BMI=0.364, p=0.180, Beta for BMI=0.578, p=0.011, Beta for IL-8=1.097, p=0.005, Beta for IL-8=0.567, p=0.017, Beta for IGF-1=0.757, p=0.039 Beta for age= -0.532, p=0.035, Beta for TNF-α= -0.611, p=0.016
  15. 15. Conclusions:Successful chemotherapya) results in lower post-prandial insulin levels, indicating thatthe effect of malignancy to insulin resistance is blunted andb) at the same time reveals the well-known positive relationshipbetween BMI and insulin resistance.

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