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Agile Marketing: Managing Marketing in a World of Constant Change

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Agile Marketing: Managing Marketing in a World of Constant Change

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Learn how an agile approach to marketing management may be the single most valuable decision your organization can make. Plus, examples of successful agile marketing for content marketing, social media & conversion optimization.

Learn how an agile approach to marketing management may be the single most valuable decision your organization can make. Plus, examples of successful agile marketing for content marketing, social media & conversion optimization.

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Agile Marketing: Managing Marketing in a World of Constant Change

  1. Agile Marketing by Scott Brinker @chiefmartec
  2. Do you like multiplication?
  3. Multiplication of touchpoints.
  4. Multiplication of content.
  5. Multiplication of devices.
  6. Multiplication of technologies.
  7. Multiplication of data.
  8. “There must be a pony in here somewhere!”
  9. Multiplication of ideas.
  10. Holy cats! It’s a full-time job just keeping up with all the things you should be keeping up with.
  11. Unprecedented scale of change.
  12. Unprecedented speed of change.
  13. Stop the ride. I’m going to be sick.
  14. Sorry, this is the new normal.
  15. Real-time marketing.
  16. High-metabolism marketing.
  17. What’s next? Something even faster?
  18. Warp-drive marketing?
  19. Is it too late to consider a career change to something more tranquil?
  20. Like a role on Deadliest Catch?
  21. TRUE FACT: Commercial Alaskan king crab fisherman have longer average tenure than CMOs.
  22. CMO tenure: 4.8 years Source: CMO Survey, February 2013, www.cmosurvey.org
  23. But we love marketing.
  24. We need a more enlightened approach to change.
  25. Agile marketing.
  26. Buzzword du jour?
  27. Who wouldn’t want to be agile?
  28. Little-a agile: an adjective.
  29. Big-AAgile: a methodology.
  30. Let’s just go with “agile marketing” because shift keys are a pain.
  31. “Agile marketing” is applying agile management methods in the context of marketing.
  32. So what is agile management?
  33. An iterativeand adaptiveprocess
  34. An iterativeand adaptiveprocess where small, highly-collaborativeteams
  35. An iterativeand adaptiveprocess where small, highly-collaborativeteams work in a series of short cycles,
  36. An iterativeand adaptiveprocess where small, highly-collaborativeteams work in a series of short cycles, incorporating rapid feedback,
  37. An iterativeand adaptiveprocess where small, highly-collaborativeteams work in a series of short cycles, incorporating rapid feedback, to deliver emergentsolutions,
  38. An iterativeand adaptiveprocess where small, highly-collaborativeteams work in a series of short cycles, incorporating rapid feedback, to deliver emergentsolutions, emphasizing transparency among all stakeholders.
  39. FOUL: Gobbledygook on the stage.
  40. An iterativeand adaptiveprocess where small, highly-collaborativeteams work in a series of short cycles, incorporating rapid feedback, to deliver emergentsolutions, emphasizing transparency among all stakeholders.
  41. An iterative and adaptiveprocess where small, highly-collaborative teams work in a series of short cycles, incorporating rapid feedback, to deliver emergent solutions, emphasizing transparency among all stakeholders.
  42. A brief history of “agile.”
  43. It began with software engineers...
  44. “Waterfall” project management.
  45. This is a predictive process, not an adaptive one.
  46. In the real world, things change.
  47. Going back up the waterfall is perilous.
  48. There must be a better way.
  49. agilemanifesto.org
  50. Scrum is the #1 agile framework.
  51. An agile task board.
  52. Driven by user stories. As a ____(role)_____, I want __(goal/desire)_ so that __(benefit)___.
  53. Sprints: 1-4 weeks, 4-8 cross-functional people.
  54. T-shaped people.
  55. The daily 15-minute stand-up.
  56. 3 Questions of the Daily Stand-up: 1. What did I do yesterday?
  57. 3 Questions of the Daily Stand-up: 1. What did I do yesterday? 2. What am I going to do today?
  58. 3 Questions of the Daily Stand-up: 1. What did I do yesterday? 2. What am I going to do today? 3. Are there any impedimentsin my way?
  59. Potentially shippable increment.
  60. The sprint review.
  61. The sprint retrospective.
  62. Inspect, adapt, repeat.
  63. Benefits of adopting agile: 84% Ability to change priorities Source: VersionOne 6th Annual State of Agile Survey
  64. Benefits of adopting agile: 84% Ability to change priorities 77% Improved project visibility Source: VersionOne 6th Annual State of Agile Survey
  65. Benefits of adopting agile: 84% Ability to change priorities 77% Improved project visibility 75% Increased productivity Source: VersionOne 6th Annual State of Agile Survey
  66. Benefits of adopting agile: 84% Ability to change priorities 77% Improved project visibility 75% Increased productivity 72% Improved team morale Source: VersionOne 6th Annual State of Agile Survey
  67. Benefits of adopting agile: 84% Ability to change priorities 77% Improved project visibility 75% Increased productivity 72% Improved team morale 71% Faster time-to-market Source: VersionOne 6th Annual State of Agile Survey
  68. What does this have to do with marketing?
  69. The marketing plan is dead.
  70. Who killed the marketing plan?
  71. The connected customer.
  72. ZMOT: Winning the Zero Moment of Truth, Jim Lecinski
  73. Hey, who twisted up my funnel?
  74. The Cynefin Framework (pronounced ku-nev-in)
  75. A Ferrari is complicated.
  76. A rainforest is complex.
  77. Marketing used to be complicated.
  78. Marketing used to be complicated. Now it is complex.
  79. This is complex.
  80. This is complex.
  81. This is complex.
  82. From Stretched to Strengthened, IBM Global CMO Study 2011
  83. What do you do in a complex environment?
  84. Probe, sense, respond. Experiment.
  85. That, sir, is a dead marketing plan.
  86. The yearly marketing plan process kind of looked like this:
  87. “Little strategy” marketing cycles kind of look like this:
  88. Could we adapt agile development methodologies to help us manage complex, modern marketing?
  89. Short answer: yes.
  90. Agile Development Values
  91. Agile Marketing Values Individuals and interactions over processes and tools.
  92. Self-organizing teams. High-bandwidth communications. Direct customer interactions.
  93. Agile Marketing Values Responding to change over following a plan.
  94. Respond to market feedback. Avoid “sunk cost” traps. Act on new opportunities.
  95. Agile Marketing Values Remarkable customer experiences over formalized internal procedures.
  96. Marketing is not manufacturing. “The model is not reality.” Customers don’t see silos.
  97. Agile Marketing Values Testing and data over opinions and conventions.
  98. Beware the HiPPO. Seek “validated learning.” Detect when things change.
  99. Agile Marketing Values Many small experiments over a few large bets.
  100. Adaptive and iterative campaigns over “Big Bang” campaigns. Probe, sense, respond. Discovery over prophecy.
  101. Agile principles have many advocates.
  102. Big data thrives with experimentation.
  103. Big Data Generate hypotheses Big Testing Prove cause- and-effect Big Experience Deliver better experiences
  104. Agree in principle? How does that translate into practice?
  105. If agile development delivers software, what does agile marketing deliver?
  106. We ship content!
  107. Stories along the buyer’s journey. As a ___(persona)____, I want __(goal/desire)_ so that __(benefit)___.
  108. Marketing missions with small, discrete components.
  109. Content marketing is great for agile marketing.
  110. Social media marketing is great for agile marketing.
  111. Web development is great for agile marketing.
  112. Search engine optimization (SEO) is great for agile marketing.
  113. Mobile app development is great for agile marketing.
  114. Marketing automation is great for agile marketing.
  115. PPC advertising is great for agile marketing.
  116. Landing page optimization is great for agile marketing.
  117. Landing page optimization is great for agile marketing.
  118. Mobile landing page optimization is great for agile marketing.
  119. Disclosure: my company sells software for agile production of amazing landing pages (and more).
  120. FOUL: Blatant self-promotion on the stage.
  121. Many marketingmissions can be broken into discrete chunks for iteration and adaptation.
  122. How do you get started?
  123. Read “Essential Scrum” by Kenneth S. Rubin For software development, but Chapter 2 will give you a great high- level explanation of Scrum, and Chapter 3 is one of the best articulated arguments for adopting agile for any executive.
  124. Read more specifically about “agile marketing” on the web: http://chiefmartec.com/category/agile-marketing/ http://www.agilemarketing.net http://www.seomoz.org/blog/agile-marketing-whiteboard-friday http://www.agilemarketingblog.com http://agilemarketingmanifesto.org http://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2012/10/01/agile- marketing-guide http://neilperkin.typepad.com/only_dead_fish/agile-planning.html http://gregmeyer.com/?s=agile+marketing
  125. Share and discuss with with colleagues. Not just marketing: sales, IT, and beyond.
  126. Win executive support.
  127. Get volunteers for your first agile team.
  128. Prepare for acclimation. Modest expectations for your first sprints.
  129. Focus on being agile, not just doing agile.
  130. Brace yourself for resistance.
  131. Most sacred cows are not agile.
  132. Why agile adoption fails: 52% Inability to change culture Source: VersionOne 6th Annual State of Agile Survey
  133. Why agile adoption fails: 52% Inability to change culture 39% General resistance to change Source: VersionOne 6th Annual State of Agile Survey
  134. Why agile adoption fails: 52% Inability to change culture 39% General resistance to change 34% Lack of manager support Source: VersionOne 6th Annual State of Agile Survey
  135. “To the uninitiated (and sometimes even to those in the industry), this way of working feels like barely controlled chaos.” February 2013 www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Business_Technology/BT_Organization/Competing_in_a_digital_world_Four_lessons_from_the_software_industry_3058
  136. Challenge in a Complex Domain “Of primary concern is the temptation to fall back into traditional command-and-control management styles— to demand fail-safe business plans with defined outcomes.” – David J. Snowden and Mary E. Boone A Leader’s Framework for Decision Making
  137. Is it worth it?
  138. “Accelerated cycles, increased transparency, and teaming outside the typical organizational boundaries (both within and outside the company) will have great impact.” February 2013 www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Business_Technology/BT_Organization/Competing_in_a_digital_world_Four_lessons_from_the_software_industry_3058
  139. Punctuated equilibrium.
  140. Modern marketing is an Olympic sport.
  141. Modern marketing is an Olympic sport. It’s better to be agile.
  142. Thank you! Want to reach me? sbrinker@ioninteractive.com Twitter: @chiefmartec More about agile marketing: http://chiefmartec.com Software to help you be agile: http://ioninteractive.com
  143. Credits: Inspiration from these brilliant people (and others): Agile Marketing Agile Development And More Matt Blumberg Kent Beck David Armano John Cass Ron Jeffries Brian Clark Jonathon Colman Mitch Lacey Steve Denning Frank Days Robert C. Martin Jim Manzi Jim Ewel Kenneth S. Rubin Eric Ries Neil Perkin Michael Sahota Peter Sims Todd Shimizu Ken Schwaber David J. Snowden Jascha Kaykas-Wolff Jeff Sutherland Brian Solis
  144. Thank you! Want to reach me? sbrinker@ioninteractive.com Twitter: @chiefmartec More about agile marketing: http://chiefmartec.com Software to help you be agile: http://ioninteractive.com

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