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HAV Risk Management Best Practice - Myths and Reality

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This presentation is a pragmatic guide to current best practice in hand arm Vibration (HAV) risk management. It includes the myths surrounding vibration risk assessment, PPE (simple, there is none...) and other red herrings that can waste resources that would be better spent on risk reduction.

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HAV Risk Management Best Practice - Myths and Reality

  1. 1. HAV Management Best Practice www.invc.co.uk vibration HAV Risk Management Myths and Best Practice Industrial Noise and Vibration Centre
  2. 2. Industrial Noise and Vibration Centre • Invited to present on the HSE Road-Shows across the UK to launch the new HAV (and noise) regulations • The largest HAV database of accurate field values available  virtual assessments as per HSE guidance • Developed and run the IOSH HAV competency courses  the major provider of noise and HAV training in the UK • Developed Croner, 3M, Desoutter … HAV Documentation • HAV-Test tool maintenance system www.invc.co.uk • Vibration control design and development
  3. 3. Vibration Management Programme Objective: establish and implement "Best Practice" for each element - in your particular circumstances.... • Identify potential hazardous tools and operations list tool types, models, manufacturers + "jobs“ • Assess risks for tools and operations representative sample + published data • Train managers, supervisors and operators • Implement Risk Reduction Programme PPE, ergonomics, operating conditions, maintenance, modifications… www.invc.co.uk • Buy / Hire Smooth implement vibration purchasing / hiring policy • Health Surveillance Programme where A(8) exposure likely to be > 2.5m/s2) • Audit Programme
  4. 4. Vibration Management Programme • Identify potential hazardous tools and operations list tool types, models, manufacturers + "jobs“ • Assess risks for tools and operations representative sample + published data • Train managers, supervisors and operators Much of the safety Reduction Programme • Implement Risk industry has a "risk measurement" culture, with assessment as an end in itself maintenance, modifications… PPE, ergonomics, operating conditions, rather than as a precursor to the more challenging action to reduce risk... • Buy / Hire Smooth implement vibration purchasing / hiring policy "If you are paying suppliers or consultants to measure your • Health Surveillance Programme tool vibration every year or two, it's very good business for where completely unnecessary..." them, but A(8) exposure likely to be > 2.5m/s2) www.invc.co.uk • Audit Programme
  5. 5. Vibration Risk Assessment • Tasks and activities list typical tasks and operations that could pose a potential risk • Tools and Plant list items of plant / tools that could pose a potential risk - include tool details, manufacturers and models, accessories/consumables used, task, material etc. www.invc.co.uk • Vibration data acquire matching field data from reliable sources of published data; set-up vibration assessments for the minimum number of tasks for which good information is not available. This generates a realistic estimate of the typical range of vibration for each activity • Trigger times acquire estimates of realistic likely finger-on-trigger times for the various tools and activities http://www.invc.co.uk/noise/vibration/handarm-vibration/
  6. 6. Dosimetry • Noise: well understood technology high cost logging meters + software used to assess the likely exposures of typical operators via sampling of staff as part of a risk assessment: c £400 / unit • Vibration: instrumentation - only relatively recently available HAVi: simple, low cost tool single-tool use timer and dose evaluation: c £35 - £50 / unit www.invc.co.uk HAVmeter: high cost, multi-tool use timer and dose evaluation with reporting software: c £350/head + £750 base-station (8) + £6k software (10 users) + subscription Both can be useful during initial assessment and as a "tool“ to remind operators of the risks. But: cost v benefit analysis must be carried out.
  7. 7. Assessment Cost v Benefit The only reason to carry out an assessment is to provide you with the data you need to develop a practical Plan of Action to reduce the risks. www.invc.co.uk Best Practice Objectives assess typical operator tool and / or task (multi-tool) vibration exposures in terms of daily dose or dose per task e.g. dose per wheel (wrench / wheel nuts); dose per meter of trench.... evaluate data to generate statistics for each task which are then used in the risk assessment (as for noise) develop an Action Plan to implement a risk reduction programme Resource Allocation spend the minimum on assessment of both vibration values and trigger times. Once you have good representative statistics, any further expenditure on assessment is unnecessary spend as much of your resources as possible on risk reduction, rather than measurement
  8. 8. www.invc.co.uk Equivalent Daily Vibration Exposures
  9. 9. www.invc.co.uk A(8): Vibration v Trigger Time Risk is proportional to vibration: x2 vibration = x2 risk Risk is proportional to square root of trigger time: x4 time = x2 risk Accuracy of vibration values is much more important than trigger time
  10. 10. www.invc.co.uk Instrumenting Rivet Hammer 233m/s2 – overload(!) – needs mechanical filter….
  11. 11. Measurement v Virtual Assessment HSE Guidance and Recommendations:• use reliable published field vibration data as the basis for risk assessments wherever possible • companies should spend their time and resources reducing risk rather than on re-measuring tools for which accurate field data is already available or reassessing tools or activities for which they already have good data www.invc.co.uk Important Note • Unlike most other workplace risks, it is only necessary to carry out a full HAV assessment once. Unless you change the tools or the way they are used, there is no need to reassess - simply update data to include any new plant. This is a fundamental difference that affects the economics of purchasing vibration monitoring equipment for inhouse use. e.g. noise assessments have to be reviewed at least every 2 years. http://www.invc.co.uk/noise/vibration/handarm-vibration/#havbase
  12. 12. www.invc.co.uk Angles on Angle Grinding Cut-off v fettling - very different vibration values
  13. 13. Template Tool Register www.invc.co.uk Necessary part of best practice + approved tool list…
  14. 14. www.invc.co.uk HAV and Noise Assessment Database http://www.invc.co.uk/noise/vibration/handarm-vibration/#havbase
  15. 15. HAV-Base HAV Risk Statistics Tool Category www.invc.co.uk -1 s.d. Vibration m/s2 mean +1 s.d. Points or time to EAV / ELV
  16. 16. Presentation of Vibration Data www.invc.co.uk Tool Vibration m/s2 "to EAV" Working Time (mins)
  17. 17. www.invc.co.uk "Safe" Working Distance for PPE
  18. 18. www.invc.co.uk HAV Tool Assessment Options and Costs
  19. 19. www.invc.co.uk Vibration Management Programme Identify potential hazardous tools and operations list tool types, models, manufacturers + "jobs" Assess risks for tools and operations representative sample + published data Train managers, supervisors and operators Implement Risk Reduction Programme PPE, ergonomics, operating conditions, maintenance, engineering modifications ..... Buy Smooth implement vibration purchasing policy Health Surveillance Programme where A(8) exposure likely to be > 2.5m/s2 Audit Programme Exposure Times / Job Rotation
  20. 20. Training Training is one of the most important programme elements as there is considerable lack of knowledge of the risks and costs of vibration plus substantial under-reporting by operators.  management and supervisors: personal motivation, company policy, vibration management programme  "toolbox" talks for operators / supervisors: personal motivation and risk prevention, symptom reporting procedures, company policy  competency training for large companies www.invc.co.uk Personal behaviour has a very large impact on the health risk posed by any given vibration exposure http://www.invc.co.uk/training-section/training/vibration-training-courses/
  21. 21. www.invc.co.uk Vibration Management Programme Identify potential hazardous tools and operations list tool types, models, manufacturers + "jobs" Assess risks for tools and operations representative sample + published data Train managers, supervisors and operators Implement Risk Reduction Programme PPE, ergonomics, operating conditions, maintenance, engineering modifications ..... Buy Smooth implement vibration purchasing policy Health Surveillance Programme where A(8) exposure likely to be > 2.5m/s2 Audit Programme Exposure Times / Job Rotation
  22. 22. www.invc.co.uk PPE2 with gloves on ... Hard hats, safety glasses, visors, masks, earmuffs ..... But for Hand-Arm Vibration ...................
  23. 23. PPE for Vibration None! so called "anti-vibration" gloves generally have little or no effect on weighted levels of hand vibration except in very unusual circumstances. gloves are useful to keep hands warm and provide physical protection but "anti-vibration" gloves are thick and unwieldy But .... www.invc.co.uk use conventional gloves to keep hands warm as they are more comfortable and provide better ergonomics
  24. 24. www.invc.co.uk Personal Behaviour.... 16m/s2: 12 minutes re 2.5m/s2; 48 minutes re 5m/s2. VWB…
  25. 25. Exhaust Air - Hand Temperature Temperature Problems Air exhausts can cool operators' hands which makes them more susceptible to the effects of vibration. Cold handles can also produce a similar effect. www.invc.co.uk Solutions Scrap tubing and an old gauntlet were used here to direct exhaust air away from the hands. Rubber sleeving can also be used as insulation on metal handles to keep hands warmer. pictures: HSE Vibration Solutions
  26. 26. Change Process, Mechanise Remote control vibratory plate picture: HSE Vibration Solutions Operator vibration exposure - www.invc.co.uk ZERO! There can also be productivity and other operational benefits that make remote control plant more cost effective than manual operation. Casting Shell Knockout Replaced manual riveting hammer with jig mounted breaker reducing exposure from 10m/s2 to 0m/s2. Cost c £2500.
  27. 27. Maintenance - Needlegun Field Assessment A vibration check on-site revealed a weighted level of 15m/s2 compared with an expected value of the order of 4m/s2. Maintenance Dismantling the tool showed that many of the needles were broken and that one of them was jamming the vibration cushioning system. Once repaired, a field re-test produce a vibration level of 4m/s2. www.invc.co.uk picture: HSE Vibration Solutions Operators should report unusually high levels of vibration on individual tools.
  28. 28. www.invc.co.uk Summary of Measures to Reduce Personal Risk Maintenance - keep tools well maintained Exercise hands during work periods Always report any Hand-Arm symptoms Smoking - don't smoke, especially before using tools Use the right tool for the job in the right way (ergonomics) Report faulty, ineffective or poorly maintained tools Ensure you keep your hands as warm as possible Short breaks - multiple short breaks better than long ones
  29. 29. www.invc.co.uk Vibration Management Programme Identify potential hazardous tools and operations list tool types, models, manufacturers + "jobs" Assess risks for tools and operations representative sample + published data Train managers, supervisors and operators Implement Risk Reduction Programme PPE, ergonomics, operating conditions, maintenance, engineering modifications ..... Buy / Hire Smooth implement vibration purchasing / hiring policy Health Surveillance Programme where A(8) exposure likely to be > 2.5m/s2 Audit Programme Exposure Times / Job Rotation
  30. 30. "Traffic Lights" - Hirer Beware... The Hire Association Europe introduced a "traffic light" system for grading tool vibration levels against the Exposure Limit Value. • based on manufacturers' declared laboratory data The colour coding implies that "green" tools do not pose a significant HAV risk - whereas many of these tools would be classified as "amber" or "red" if categorised according to field vibration data. • only use this grading as an initial guide - do not use it as the basis for any form of risk assessment www.invc.co.uk "Amber" rock drill (hirer catalogue extract) ".. 5-10m/s2, up to 2 hours use without further risk assessment .." 12-24m/s2 INVC field measurements on these drills at the hirer 5 minutes to reach Action Value, 20 minutes to reach Limit Value!
  31. 31. Vibration Test Standards These tests should be carried out by the manufacturer machines run on artificial loads - to get repetitive values vibration value is hand-arm weighted rms value (ISO 5349) ISO 8662 / EN 50144, EN 60745:2003 series - single axis values EN60745:2006/2007; ISO 28927 - tri-axial vector sum values 3 skilled operators load tool during measurements www.invc.co.uk The results are the "Declared Values" for vibration from the tools that should be included in the technical file by the manufacturer.
  32. 32. Manufacturers' Declared Vibration Values This information provided by the manufacturers' is based on laboratory tests under controlled conditions. Most of these tests have little or no relationship to the way that the tools are used in practice. The HSE guidance suggests doubling the declared values as a starting point… You should not use manufacturers' declared data for risk assessments unless you can show they are representative. For example ... Supplier Data Field Results grinder 3 5 - 12 damped chipper www.invc.co.uk Tool <2.5 17 damped riveter <2.5 8
  33. 33. www.invc.co.uk Vibration Management Programme Identify potential hazardous tools and operations list tool types, models, manufacturers + "jobs" Assess risks for tools and operations representative sample + published data - Train managers, supervisors and operators Implement Risk Reduction Programme PPE, ergonomics, operating conditions, maintenance, engineering modifications ..... Buy Smooth implement vibration purchasing policy Health Surveillance Programme where A(8) exposure likely to be > 2.5m/s2 Audit Programme Exposure Times / Job Rotation
  34. 34. Tiered Health Surveillance System Tier 1 - Pre-employment baseline check - self-administered Tier 2 - Annual Screening - self-administered - option to appoint "Responsible Person" Tier 3 - Clinical assessment - by qualified person (e.g. occupational health nurse) www.invc.co.uk Tier 4 - Diagnosis - qualified doctor Tier 5 - Standardised Tests (optional) - highly specialised service See HSE regulatory guidance L140 for sample questionnaires.
  35. 35. HAV Management Best Practice www.invc.co.uk vibration HAV Risk Management Best Practice FAQ Industrial Noise and Vibration Centre: www.invc.co.uk
  36. 36. HAV Risk Management FAQs - 1 Do I have to measure the vibration on all my tools? No - only measure if you cannot get good data from other sources (not manufacturers' data unless you can show it is representative). How often do I have to repeat vibration assessments? Never! It only has to be done well once - update if you get new tool types. www.invc.co.uk What is the best way to get accurate finger-on-trigger times? Depends on the circumstances - in simple cases with relatively low risk, observation; for higher risk or more complex activities, use tool timers over a sufficient time and number of tools to acquire good statistics. We often recommend either buying a number of HAVi units or hiring HAVmeters until you have the data you need. Remember that the accuracy of trigger times is not as important as that of tool vibration values in determining dose. Is dosimetry advisable or necessary? No - once you have good assessment data, further measurement is usually unnecessary (as with noise) and will not change the actions you have to take. The resources should be spent on risk reduction instead.
  37. 37. HAV Risk Management FAQs - 2 What is the best way to monitor and record tool use and exposures? Often not necessary for standard work e.g. trenches, mowing, production environments. For high risk, high variability activities, keep it as simple as possible - but configured to fit with company culture. From simple paper systems to PC data entry (e.g. equipped vans) to tags and click-counters to meters. The key is to implement the best cost / benefit approach possible in your particular environment. How can I make best use of a limited budget? Minimise expenditure on assessment and prioritise control measures proportional to risk and the number of personnel affected. www.invc.co.uk Is there any effective PPE for HAVS? No! - but use conventional gloves to keep hands warm...
  38. 38. HAV Risk Management FAQs - 3 www.invc.co.uk How do I ensure that we comply with the regulations in practice? Audit on the ground and compare and document your practices against the best practice benchmarks for your industry. What are key elements the court will consider if there is a claim? Have you established what comprises best practice in risk reduction for your industry and then implemented it? Do you have documentary evidence that you are complying in practice? (audits of operational procedures, tool selection, purchasing / hiring, training...) How have you prioritised your allocation of resources to minimise the risk to personnel exposed to vibration? (if you have spent most of your budget on measurement or "PPE", you are doomed....) Do you have effective health surveillance in place for personnel at risk? (making use of the results)
  39. 39. HAV Management Audit www.invc.co.uk Benchmark current practice against best practice for your industry. Initial Audit policy and procedural review and typical site visits existing data - quality of risk assessments and statistics discussion - knowledge / training initial report - weaknesses, short-term improvements planning meeting(s) Company HAV Management Programme Update procedures and documentation site testing and feedback - update programme training programme Action Plan Implementation roll-out programme audit at suitable intervals - HAV Management Reports http://www.invc.co.uk/noise/vibration/handarm-vibration/#havbase
  40. 40. Vibration Management Programme www.invc.co.uk The objective is to establish and implement "Best Practice" for each of these elements – in your particular circumstances. Identify potential hazardous tools and operations list tool types, models, manufacturers + "jobs" Assess risks for tools and operations representative sample + published data - Train managers, supervisors and operators Implement Risk Reduction Programme PPE, ergonomics, operating conditions, maintenance, engineering modifications ..... Buy Smooth implement vibration purchasing policy Health Surveillance Programme where A(8) exposure likely to be > 2.5m/s2) Audit Programme
  41. 41. HAV Management Best Practice vibration www.invc.co.uk HAV Risk Management Myths and Best Practice Thank you. Questions? Industrial Noise and Vibration Centre http://www.invc.co.uk/noise/vibration/handarm-vibration/

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