Governing	  Hybrid	  Open	  Source	  Community	  Stephanie	  Freeman,	  PhD	  Post	  doc	  Researcher,	  INUSE	  (h:p://in...
Freeman,	  S.	  2011.	  Construc6ng	  a	  Community:	         Myths	  and	  Reali6es	  of	  the	  Open	  Development	     ...
Theore;cal	  sensi;zing	  concepts	                                	  •      Collabora6ve	  community	  (Adler,	  2006;	  ...
Intermediary	  concepts	  used	  for	  developing	  a	             discursive-­‐rhetorical	  approach	  1.  Cultural	  and...
ConcIusions	  I	  From	  hacker	  ethic	  and	  bazaar	  governance	  to	         more	  professionally	  and	  strategica...
ConcIusions	  II	  New	  developer	  &	  user	  categories	  in	  OSS	  -­‐	                 new	  innova;on	  intermediar...
Methodological	  and	  theore;cal	  	               contribu;on	  •  	  Discursive-­‐ac;on	  community	  as	  a	  specific	...
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Stephanie Freeman Governing hybrid open source freeman

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Stephanie Freeman Governing hybrid open source freeman

  1. 1. Governing  Hybrid  Open  Source  Community  Stephanie  Freeman,  PhD  Post  doc  Researcher,  INUSE  (h:p://inuse.fi)  Department  of  Management  and  InternaDonal  Business  Aalto  University  stephanie.freeman@aalto.fi        
  2. 2. Freeman,  S.  2011.  Construc6ng  a  Community:   Myths  and  Reali6es  of  the  Open  Development   Model     •  How  is  the  structure  and  membership   constella;on  of  the  community,   specifically  the  rela;on  between   developers  and  users  linguis;cally   constructed  in  hybrid  open   development?           •  What  characterizes  Internet-­‐mediated  Mailing  list  discussion,  personal  interviews,   “virtual”  communi;es  and  how  can  web  page  wri;ngs,  email  exchanges,  field   they  be  defined?  How  do  they  differ  notes  and  other  historical  documents     from  hierarchical  forms  of  knowledge       produc;on  on  one  hand  and  from  Four  case  studies  inside  one:   tradi;onal  volunteer  communi;es  on   the  other?    OpenOffice.org    Groupware  project      OpenOffice.org  Lingucomponent  project    Four  Finnish  public  sector  user  organiza;ons    The  OpenOffice.org  website    
  3. 3. Theore;cal  sensi;zing  concepts    •  Collabora6ve  community  (Adler,  2006;  2007;  2007;  see  also  Adler  &  Hecksher,   2008;  Adler,  Kwon  &  Hecksher,  2008):      •  Communi6es  of  prac6ce  (Lave  &  Wenger,  1991;  Holland  &  Lave,  2009;  Wenger,   1998)      •  Community  as  objet-­‐oriented  ac6vity  (Engeström,  1987)    •  Imagined  community  (Anderson,  1983;  cf.  Cohen,  1985;  Delanty,  2010;  Maffesoli,   1996)  
  4. 4. Intermediary  concepts  used  for  developing  a   discursive-­‐rhetorical  approach  1.  Cultural  and  discursive  psychology  (e.g.  Billig  Condor,  Edwards,  Gane,   Middleton  &  Radley  1988;  Harré,  1998;  Mulhauser  &  Harré,  1990;  Shofer, 1993),  2.   cri;cal  discourse  analysis  (e.g.  Fairclough,  1992;  see  also  van  Dijk,  1993)  3.   social  psychology,  specifically  the  work  by  Henri  Tajfel  (1981;  1982)  on   social  categories  (cf.  Sacks,  1992),  and    4.  poli;cal  science,  specifically  the  work  by  Quen;n  Skinner  (2006)  on   changing  poli;cal  rhetoric.  
  5. 5. ConcIusions  I  From  hacker  ethic  and  bazaar  governance  to   more  professionally  and  strategically  regulated  community  •  Empirical  chapter  1.  Open  code  and  open  dialogue  cons;tu;ve  to  the  success  of  volunteer-­‐   firm-­‐collabora;on    -­‐>  also  “openness”  has  boundaries      •  Empirical  chapter  2.  Volunteers’  changing  paferns  of  mo;va;ons  :  “independent   entrepreneurs”  with  mobile  membership    in  search  of  collabora;ve  community  –  dis;nc;on   between  work  and  hobby  blurred  and  changing  -­‐>  the  concept  of  “volunteer”  ques;onable      •  Empirical  chapter  3.  User  freedom  or  user  control?  IT  staff  as    the  “obligatory  passage  point”     in  the  dissemina;on  of    open  source  to  end-­‐user  organiza;ons  -­‐>  also  open  source  can  be   used  for  control  purposes  •  Empirical  chapter  4.  “Community”  -­‐  a  powerful  word  and  strategic  tool  for  orien;ng  towards   mul;ple  real  and  imagined  audiences    -­‐>    open  source  communi;es  are  managed  through   the  prac;ce  of  authoring  
  6. 6. ConcIusions  II  New  developer  &  user  categories  in  OSS  -­‐   new  innova;on  intermediaries  From  user-­‐developers  and    the  core-­‐periphery  dis;nc;on  to  :      1)  idea-­‐genera;ng  users    2)  independent  plug-­‐in  and  extension  tool  providers    3)  typical  (end)  users    4)  ideological  researcher-­‐users  5)  media;ng  IT  staff    6)  media;ng  management      •  open  development  not  collabora;ve  from  the  start!  •  return  to  the  developer-­‐user  paradox…?  •  Lead-­‐users?      
  7. 7. Methodological  and  theore;cal     contribu;on  •   Discursive-­‐ac;on  community  as  a  specific   type  of  online  engagement  •  Community  authorship  as  a  way  of   highligh;ng  power  rela;ons  in  communi;es  •  Runaway  community  characteris;c  of  online   open  source  development      

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