Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Energy Policies of IEA CountriesIreland 2012 ReviewGovernment Buildings, Merrion Street, Dublin11 July 2012Maria van der H...
Review background IEA conducts regular reviews every 5 to 6 years The review took place in November 2010 Based on the I...
Notable changes since the last review Significant reforms have continued, despite the  economic downturn    Electricity ...
Primary Energy Supply is hydrocarbon-based Fossil fuels = 95%    Oil is 48% TPES, remains                               ...
Decarbonising electricity generation Renewables policy emphasis – 40% generation by 2020    Favourable REFITs extended  ...
Decarbonising with demand-side measures Very proactive energy efficiency policy    National target of 20% savings in 202...
Importance of infrastructure projects Electricity                           Map of gas pipelines    East-West interconne...
Addressing energy security concerns Electricity production increasingly based on renewables    Gas to provide power when...
Deepening regional integration Push for all-island market with Northern Ireland   Electricity:    SEM has been successfu...
Key recommendations (1/2)The government of Ireland should Support diversification and flexibility of gas supply Enhance ...
Key recommendations (2/2)The government of Ireland should Ensure that participation in regional energy markets  brings be...
Implementing our recommendations will help Ireland to Improve its energy security, at a time of heightened  risks Create...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Energy Policies of IEA Countries Ireland 2012 Review - IEA Executive Director

2,150 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Energy Policies of IEA Countries Ireland 2012 Review - IEA Executive Director

  1. 1. Energy Policies of IEA CountriesIreland 2012 ReviewGovernment Buildings, Merrion Street, Dublin11 July 2012Maria van der HoevenExecutive DirectorInternational Energy Agency © OECD/IEA 2012
  2. 2. Review background IEA conducts regular reviews every 5 to 6 years The review took place in November 2010 Based on the IEA’s Shared Goals and three pillars  Energy security  Economic growth  Environmental sustainability Peer review by experts from other IEA member countries, the European Commission (EC), and the IEA Secretariat © OECD/IEA 2012
  3. 3. Notable changes since the last review Significant reforms have continued, despite the economic downturn  Electricity and natural gas markets  Renewable energy  Energy efficiency and climate change © OECD/IEA 2012
  4. 4. Primary Energy Supply is hydrocarbon-based Fossil fuels = 95%  Oil is 48% TPES, remains Mtoe 16 largest energy source 14  Coal (9%) and peat (6%) 12 declining; still sizeable 10  Gas growing, now 33% TPES 8 6 Push for renewables 4  Huge wind potential 2 0  Biomass small; developing 1973 1978 1983 1988 1993 1998 2003 2008 Oil Natural gas Peat Coal Biofuels and waste Wind  R&D in ocean energy Not in energy mix  Solar and hydro limited  No nuclear allowed © OECD/IEA 2012
  5. 5. Decarbonising electricity generation Renewables policy emphasis – 40% generation by 2020  Favourable REFITs extended 35 TWh  Wind =10%; 30% 2020 target 30  New REFITs for 2nd gen. biomass 25 20 Gas is the dominant fuel 15  Now accounts for 62% of power 10  Will grow in tandem with growth in 5 variable renewables 0 1973 1976 1979 1982 1985 1988 1991 1994 1997 2000 2003 2006 2009 Oil Natural gas Peat Coal Hydro Biofuels and waste Wind Coal and peat are declining  Carbon tax disincentive  Peat subsidies phased out © OECD/IEA 2012
  6. 6. Decarbonising with demand-side measures Very proactive energy efficiency policy  National target of 20% savings in 2020 (compared to 1990)  Public sector to be exemplary, with a target of 30% savings  Detailed NEEAP outlines 90 measures across all sectors of the economy Energy R&D into low-carbon technologies  Public funds quintupled from 2005 and 2008; maintained despite crisis  Strong engagement with ICT companies  World leader for smart grid development  Encouragement of electric vehicles  Deployment of smart meters  Strong potential for ocean energy in the future © OECD/IEA 2012
  7. 7. Importance of infrastructure projects Electricity Map of gas pipelines  East-West interconnector to GB  Grid25 for wind integration  Extra North-South line needed Gas  Possible Shannon LNG project  Corrib field still not producing  Gas storage is needed NIMBY problems  Local community concerns  Consenting process important © OECD/IEA 2012
  8. 8. Addressing energy security concerns Electricity production increasingly based on renewables  Gas to provide power when the wind generation is not available  500 MW East-West interconnector to Great Britain in 2012 Importance of reliable gas supplies  93% of gas supply comes through one entry point, Moffat  Poor geology for gas storage to meet peak demand  Efforts to diversify gas supply – Corrib, Shannon LNG Future of the sole oil refinery is uncertain  75 mb/d Whitegate refinery could close after 2016  …but the North-West Europe product market is abundant and diversified  And Ireland is increasing its domestic stockholding levels © OECD/IEA 2012
  9. 9. Deepening regional integration Push for all-island market with Northern Ireland  Electricity: SEM has been successfully implemented  Gas: CAG seeking to emulate success of SEM Integrating with UK and EU markets  500 MW East-West interconnector to Great Britain  Affected by ongoing UK electricity market reform?  Implications of EU target models for gas and electricity? Regulator’s oversight and empowerment is key © OECD/IEA 2012
  10. 10. Key recommendations (1/2)The government of Ireland should Support diversification and flexibility of gas supply Enhance the consultation, planning and consenting process for infrastructure projects Maintain funding for new low-carbon technologies, such as wind, biomass, ocean and smart grids © OECD/IEA 2012
  11. 11. Key recommendations (2/2)The government of Ireland should Ensure that participation in regional energy markets brings benefits to Irish consumers and investors Ensure that regulator’s powers are sufficient © OECD/IEA 2012
  12. 12. Implementing our recommendations will help Ireland to Improve its energy security, at a time of heightened risks Create new jobs in the new entrants to the electricity and gas sectors Limit the need for energy use and make the economy more energy-efficient Help the country become a 21st century low-carbon economy © OECD/IEA 2012

×