Impact of a Professional Development Cluster on Teachers as Global Educators Dr. Wendy R. Modzelewski Delaware Department ...
Delaware’s Turning Point in History for Global Education <ul><li>September 11, 2001 </li></ul><ul><li>Students did not und...
Delaware’s Response <ul><li>2003 – 2004 - Conducted a statewide study of global education in K12 </li></ul><ul><li>Funded ...
Findings <ul><li>Overcrowded curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Limited view and approach to global education </li></ul><ul><ul>...
Findings <ul><li>Teachers need space and tools to engage in professional development  </li></ul><ul><li>Both the teachers ...
Clusters <ul><li>Group of professional development experiences that lead to new knowledge and skills. They are research-ba...
International Education Technology Cluster <ul><li>Approximately 90-hours </li></ul><ul><li>Face-to-face meetings and onli...
Cluster Goals <ul><li>Increase teachers’ global education  knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Increase teachers’ global education...
Why iEARN? <ul><li>International Education and Resource Network </li></ul><ul><li>Capacity </li></ul><ul><li>iEARN is a no...
iEARN Online Courses <ul><li>9-week modular course providing skills in online collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Internationa...
<ul><li>Research Study </li></ul>
Purpose of the Study <ul><li>To determine the impact of the International Education Technology Cluster on teachers’ global...
Research Questions <ul><li>Do teachers who participate in the International Education Technology Cluster increase their gl...
Global Education  Knowledge <ul><li>Literature revealed 40 components </li></ul><ul><li>For purposes of this study they we...
Global Education  Skills <ul><li>Assist students to become global citizens </li></ul><ul><li>Integration of global educati...
Research Methodology <ul><li>Descriptive research </li></ul><ul><li>Content Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Instrumentation: </...
Participants <ul><li>15 females; 1 male </li></ul><ul><li>Age Range: 26 – 55 </li></ul><ul><li>Number of years teaching: 1...
<ul><li>Findings </li></ul>
Pre-cluster Findings: Demographics <ul><li>One commonality: All participants had traveled internationally before the clust...
Results -  Knowledge  Findings Category Total Components Pre-cluster Notations Portfolio A Notations Portfolio B Notations...
Pre-cluster Findings:  Knowledge <ul><li>Average Knowledge components per teacher pre-cluster:  7.25 out of a possible 40 ...
Post-cluster findings -  Knowledge <ul><li>Do teachers who participate in the International Education Technology Cluster i...
Results –  Skills  Findings Skill Pre-cluster Portfolio A Portfolio B Commitment to assisting students to become global ci...
Pre-cluster Findings:  Skills <ul><li>Average Skills per teacher pre-cluster: 1.56 out of 11 </li></ul><ul><li>Use of Mult...
Post-cluster findings -  Skills <ul><li>What changes in global education pedagogical  skills  do teachers report as a resu...
Unintended finding:  Joy & Happiness <ul><li>Teachers found this experience to be fun. Words used:  exciting, exhilarating...
Flow, Happiness and Joy <ul><li>Csikszentmihalyi (2004)  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Flow  is the “state in which people are so ...
Implications <ul><li>Encourage travel for pre-service educators as this seems to encourage an interest in global education...
Limitations <ul><li>Small study size </li></ul><ul><li>Clusters are unique to Delaware </li></ul><ul><li>Study conducted o...
Clusters Now <ul><li>Initial cluster was offered for 5 years; reached approximately 120 teachers </li></ul><ul><li>It was ...
<ul><li>The question of global education should not be one of choice, but of requirement to ensure that students in the Un...
Thank You <ul><li>Information about the International Education Technology Cluster is available at  www.dcet.k12.de.us/ins...
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Teacher's Global Knowledge

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  • Terrorist attacks Educators did not understand the attacks themsleves Support grew
  • Definition of IE: In the classroom, IE is teaching and learning about other world regions through culture and language, economics, geography, history, mathematics, and science. IE, therefore, is not a separate discipline, like physics, but instead a perspective that informs every discipline. IE also encompasses study abroad, academic and professional exchanges, and collaborations on every level.
  • Clusters Lew was one of the founding fathers of clusters Clusters were unique Focus on acquisition of new knowledge and skills; NOT seat time iEARN – International Education and Resource Network non-profit global organization that enables teachers and youth to use the Internet and other technologies to collaborate on projects that enhance learning and make a difference in the world. made up of over 30,000 schools and youth organizations in more than 130 countries. Over 2,000,000 students each day are engaged in collaborative project work worldwide. Online Course Content: Courses are content-area focused Teachers learn to: Select and integrate an online collaborative projects into their classroom Correlate your online project to your local/state/national education standards manage your classroom and technology resources available to you as you participate in an online collaborative project Communicate with iEARN project coordinators and teachers to get first hand knowledge about the project/s you would like to integrate
  • REFER TO HANDOUT Knowledge Components Humanistic Sameness Differentness, Diversity View the world differently Understand others Contact with others; interaction; engagement; share; learn from others Empathy Ability to Communicate; world language; language Work with others; solve problems; collaborate Values Personal – ethnic, religious, community or national group Universal – life, liberty, property, equality, justice, freedom of religion, free speech, peaceful assembly or asylum Literature Music Arts Performing Arts   Global World History Planet awareness (size); we are all on this planet Geography World regions Global issues human rights and/or women&apos;s rights health education food and agriculture population growth, immigration, emigration natural resources, energy environmental issues, ecology economics, trade political systems; politics; government science and technology law, conflict, security (peace); power world languages outer space   Systems interconnectedness of world; linkages; interdependence; connectivity global dynamics   Culture intercultural skills cross cultural learning   Choice Ability to select from options; take action; solve problems; effect change Living responsibly and intelligently
  • Skills referred to the specific global education pedagogies that a teacher possessed and could utilize to implement global education in his/her classroom (S. Wang, personal communication, February 1, 2008). Skill 1: Commitment to assisting students to become global citizens The Longview Foundation (2008) listed the skills globally competent students should possess as global knowledge and curiosity, language and intercultural skills, and a commitment to global citizenship and justice. Teachers, they reasoned, would need the same knowledge, skills, and dispositions as the students and also have a dimensional knowledge of a range of global issues, pedagogical skills, and a commitment to assisting students to become global citizens (Longview Foundation, 2008). Skill 6 - 8: Teach with Local to Global, Personal to Global, or Global to Local connections Curriculum can be infused with connections between the local community and the world, the individual and the world, or the world and the local community so that students can recognize these linkages. Makes global education concrete for students and media, in various formats such as print, primary source documents, and websites. Teach from the source. Perspectives may conflict Skill 10: Participate in or facilitate international festivals and/or multicultural days There are conflicting theories about activities such as international festivals or multicultural days as a component of global education. These events could be extensive in natures such as “world studies week” or “foreign culture day” (Gilliom, 1981b, p. 83). They can also be smaller events wherein a classroom focuses on a country or region and students study content such as culture, attire, housing, and food. The “skill” comes connecting this type of event to content. Imagine a Study of Japan: Kimona-dressed dolls Enameled wood dishes Ivory chopsticks Rice paper fans Students are to be quiet, sit up straight and be attentive – as Japanese students do. This instruction is tipped in favor of the exotic dimensions of the traditional culture Students gain little or no understanding of the broad range of life-styles in modern Japan One author writes of this as moving “ Beyond food, festivals, and flags ” (Skelton, 2002)
  • Content Analysis Research tool Focuses on content of media: books, speeches, interviews, discussions, historical documents Used to determine the presence of certain words, phrases, or concepts To conduct content analysis, text is broken down into manageable categories and then examined Method of examination was conceptual analysis Concepts are words that are related to the core word or phrase For example, in the Humanistic category, the concept is Sameness. Phrases that would have been coded would be phrases such as “we are all the same” or they are just like us. Refer to instrumentation. While coding can be conducted using technology, this coding was conducted manually on a spreadsheet as all the documents used were archived paper documents produced during the time of the cluster.
  • DIVERSE GROUP Sex : 15 females/1 male Ethnicity : 15 caucasian/1 African American Degrees : 4 bachelors/11 Masters degrees /1 did not report their degree level Content areas – teachers taught as few as one or as many as five content areas Age : 26 – 30: 4 36 – 40: 2 41 - 45: 3 46 – 50: 1 51 – 55: 6 Number of Years Teaching: 1 teacher was in her first year 2: less than 5 years 3: 6 – 10 years 2: 11-15 years 2: 16 – 20 years 3: 21 – 25 years 3: 26 – 30 years
  • Aligns to the literature that teachers who have traveled and had international experiences are more prone to being interested in global education.
  • Explain chart Total Components: Number of components within a category. PRE Humanistic : Recognize the human qualities of the inhabitants of this planet Most frequent: Human interaction: contact, sharing, learning from others . Different than working with others, collaborating, or solving problems Ability to communicate or Need for common language : selected by 8 Ability to work with Others, solve problems or collaborate : 2 part of their curriculum 2 personally been involved in collaborations 2 part of their building curriculum 2 desire for students to experience international collaboration and problem solving Global : Appreciation for planet earth, that we all reside on this planet, issues that will affect all inhabitants of this planet Geography World history (6) 3: were SS teachers and thought would have made this connection 3: Art teacher, librarian, computer lab instructor Systems Interconnectedness of various aspects of the world. Humans do not live in isolation of others and that actions can and do have systemic consequences for others 5 recognitions – interconnectedness rather than systemic consequences Culture No definition of culture was given Noted by 15 of the 16 participants Choice An individual has the opportunity to select from different options or actions with the recognition that the selection made may affect others globally. Only 3 teachers: 2 wanted their students to work with others to solve problems 1 indicated that she would like her students to make a difference and effect change Overall Possible total of 640 – every teacher selected every option Total pre-cluster recognition was 116 notations (18.1%). Seemed LOW when considering that 10 of the teachers taught SS or World Language and both contain components of GE in their content standards. POST Humanistic Greatest gains overall Teacher to teacher connection could explain this No one component with strong gains. Largest gain was sameness with a total gain of 7 Global Second largest gains overall Teachers partnering with teachers in other countries; wanting to know their location No one component with strong gains. Largest gains were Geography with a total gain of 5. Systems Minimal growth Overall achievement of 3 Concepts require viewing the world from a broad, system perspective Culture Highest pre-cluster recognition No increase noted One missing teacher: focused on memory building and student engagement Choice Solving problems and effecting change Only 2 increases in total Both could have been project related: 1 recycling 1 child labor COMPARISON Gains in all Knowledge categories Increase of 85 components: 73.2% increase Majority by Portfolio A Three Perspectives: Gain is to be commended. This is difficult to do and they only started with 116 This is not substantial. Teachers may not have understood goals and objectives for their learning Instrument could not adequately discern GE Knowledge
  • Previous Average Knowledge Per teacher: 7.25
  • Pre-Cluster Skills Level: 1.56
  • Portfolio A: 23 notations Portfolio B : 12 notations 1. Teacher reaction to experience “ I decided to sign up and began my adventure in one of the most interesting and exciting experiences I had had yet as a teacher” 2. Teacher reaction to something the students did “ So far, we have had much fun, and to see the enthusiasm in the children has been very exciting.” 3. Teachers reporting directly on students’ reactions “ I also believe that having this project grab the attention of my students and the fact that it showed that the students loved learning this way was a success for me as a classroom teacher.”
  • Csikszentmihalyi When people were given a list of activities and asked to choose the one that they would enjoy the most, they frequently chose “designing or discovering something new” He called this FLOW So involved in something that nothing else matters. The experience itself is so enjoyable that people will do it at even great cost, for the sheer sake of doing it. Athletes – Being in the zone Religious mystics – Being in ecstasy Artists and musicians – Aesthetic rapture To be in flow: Clear set of goals Immediate feedback Sense of balance between your abilities and those needed for the task Concentration is highly focused; don’t experience distractions No concern for failure Sense of time was distorted Activity was a goal unto itself Flow can be found in schools One of the goals of teaching should be for teachers to enable a child to observe flow learning in an adult and to experience the adult’s enthusiasm so that this transmits the enjoyment and enthusiasm for learning to the child. Happiness in action is enjoyment Wolk It is in everyone’s interest to assist teachers in finding joy in their work. Teachers need to “own their teaching” to that they and their students will experience joy in school Ways to find joy – employ certain essntials: Find pleasure in learning Give students choice Let students create things Display student work Taking time to tinker Making school spaces more inviting Getting outside Reading good books Offering more gym and art classes Transforming assessments Promoting teachers and students having fun together Educators have the responsibility of educating the whole child: mind, body and soul
  • Teacher's Global Knowledge

    1. 1. Impact of a Professional Development Cluster on Teachers as Global Educators Dr. Wendy R. Modzelewski Delaware Department of Education July 8, 2010
    2. 2. Delaware’s Turning Point in History for Global Education <ul><li>September 11, 2001 </li></ul><ul><li>Students did not understand the events in terms of geography, history, and politics </li></ul><ul><li>Many educators were unprepared to attempt to educate students </li></ul><ul><li>Support for global education grew from interest groups, foundations, U.S. government, and educational organizations </li></ul>
    3. 3. Delaware’s Response <ul><li>2003 – 2004 - Conducted a statewide study of global education in K12 </li></ul><ul><li>Funded by the Longview Foundation </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose: Determine the status of global education in our State </li></ul>
    4. 4. Findings <ul><li>Overcrowded curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Limited view and approach to global education </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>International Education is not just learning ABOUT another culture, peoples, history etc, but it is learning WITH another culture. Capitalize on the power of first-hand experiences. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Findings <ul><li>Teachers need space and tools to engage in professional development </li></ul><ul><li>Both the teachers and students need to experience the relevance of International Education. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Provide hands-on experiences where they become engaged with real people. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Clusters <ul><li>Group of professional development experiences that lead to new knowledge and skills. They are research-based, long-term, and results driven. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus: content knowledge, application, affect student achievement, teacher reflection </li></ul><ul><li>Successful completion = salary increase </li></ul>
    7. 7. International Education Technology Cluster <ul><li>Approximately 90-hours </li></ul><ul><li>Face-to-face meetings and online support </li></ul><ul><li>Partnered with iEARN; 40 hour online course </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom implementation of an international project through iEARN </li></ul><ul><li>Development of two teacher portfolios </li></ul><ul><li>Data collection and analysis </li></ul>
    8. 8. Cluster Goals <ul><li>Increase teachers’ global education knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Increase teachers’ global education skills </li></ul><ul><li>Improve and increase teacher use of technology for teaching and learning </li></ul>
    9. 9. Why iEARN? <ul><li>International Education and Resource Network </li></ul><ul><li>Capacity </li></ul><ul><li>iEARN is a non-profit global education network of over 20,000 schools in 110 countries </li></ul><ul><li>Since 1988, empowering educators and youth using technology to collaborate through projects </li></ul>
    10. 10. iEARN Online Courses <ul><li>9-week modular course providing skills in online collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>International participation. Simulates experiences students will have. </li></ul><ul><li>Participants align an iEARN project to their curriculum and standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Courses are content specific. </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers end online course with a lesson plan and are ready to continue with selected project/start new one </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>Research Study </li></ul>
    12. 12. Purpose of the Study <ul><li>To determine the impact of the International Education Technology Cluster on teachers’ global education Knowledge and Skills. </li></ul>Need for the Study <ul><li>Should the cluster be continued? </li></ul><ul><li>Can the study contribute to the body of knowledge on global education and assist in the development of purposeful and meaningful professional development? </li></ul>
    13. 13. Research Questions <ul><li>Do teachers who participate in the International Education Technology Cluster increase their global education knowledge ? </li></ul><ul><li>What changes in global education pedagogical skills do teachers report as a result of their participation? </li></ul>
    14. 14. Global Education Knowledge <ul><li>Literature revealed 40 components </li></ul><ul><li>For purposes of this study they were aggregated into 5 categories </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Humanistic – dimensions that recognize our human qualities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Global – appreciation for planet earth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Systems – interconnectedness of the world </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Culture – total way of life held by a group of people </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Choice – the choices we make may affect others globally. </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Global Education Skills <ul><li>Assist students to become global citizens </li></ul><ul><li>Integration of global education </li></ul><ul><li>Teach from multiple perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize stereotyping and bias </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize ethnocentrism </li></ul><ul><li>Local to Global perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Personal to global perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Global to local perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Teach with Multiple Media </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in International/Multicultural Festivals </li></ul><ul><li>Telecommunication Linkages </li></ul>Skills that comprise global education pedagogy:
    16. 16. Research Methodology <ul><li>Descriptive research </li></ul><ul><li>Content Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Instrumentation: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cluster Application and pre-survey </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Portfolio A (mid-year; after iEARN online course) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Portfolio B (end of cluster) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Follow-up Survey (4-5 years after the cluster) </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Participants <ul><li>15 females; 1 male </li></ul><ul><li>Age Range: 26 – 55 </li></ul><ul><li>Number of years teaching: 1 st year – 30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Taught 1 to 5 content areas: </li></ul><ul><li>Diverse grade levels: </li></ul>9 - Social Studies 3 - Science 2 – Library Skills 5 - ELA 2 - Math 2 - Art 3 - Technology 2 – English 2 nd Lang. 1 - World Language 5 - Elementary (K-5) 1 - Grades 4-12 6 - Middle School (6-8) 1 - Middle and High School 3 - High School (9-12)
    18. 18. <ul><li>Findings </li></ul>
    19. 19. Pre-cluster Findings: Demographics <ul><li>One commonality: All participants had traveled internationally before the cluster. </li></ul>
    20. 20. Results - Knowledge Findings Category Total Components Pre-cluster Notations Portfolio A Notations Portfolio B Notations Humanistic 15 52 34 9 Global 18 41 28 9 Systems 2 5 3 0 Culture 3 15 0 0 Choice 2 3 1 1 Group Totals 116 66 19
    21. 21. Pre-cluster Findings: Knowledge <ul><li>Average Knowledge components per teacher pre-cluster: 7.25 out of a possible 40 </li></ul><ul><li>Culture was the predominate Knowledge component cited. </li></ul><ul><li>Contact, interaction or engagement with others in other countries was second most cited. </li></ul>
    22. 22. Post-cluster findings - Knowledge <ul><li>Do teachers who participate in the International Education Technology Cluster increase their global education knowledge ? </li></ul><ul><li>Yes, teachers did increase their knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Average Knowledge components per teacher post-cluster: 12.56 out of a possible 40 </li></ul><ul><li>Majority of increase was by Portfolio A: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>66 total Knowledge components (10%) by Portfolio A </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>19 total Knowledge components (3%) by Portfolio B </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Largest gain: Humanistic category (7% increase) </li></ul><ul><li>Second largest gain: Global category (6% increase) </li></ul>
    23. 23. Results – Skills Findings Skill Pre-cluster Portfolio A Portfolio B Commitment to assisting students to become global citizens 2 6 1 Integration of global education into existing curriculum 3 10 2 Teach from multiple perspectives 2 1 0 Recognize stereotyping, bias, frame of reference 2 3 1 Recognize ethnocentrism 0 3 0 Teach with local to global connections 0 2 2 Teach with personal to global connections 1 3 0 Teach with global to local connections 2 3 1 Teach with multiple forms of media 6 5 2 Participate in international/multicultural days 3 1 1 Telecommunications linkages 4 7 2 Group Totals 25 44 12 Percentage of Possible Points (176) 14% 25% 7%
    24. 24. Pre-cluster Findings: Skills <ul><li>Average Skills per teacher pre-cluster: 1.56 out of 11 </li></ul><ul><li>Use of Multiple Media was the most commonly cited skill, however it was only selected by 6 out of 16 teachers. </li></ul>
    25. 25. Post-cluster findings - Skills <ul><li>What changes in global education pedagogical skills do teachers report as a result of their participation? </li></ul><ul><li>Majority of Skills increase is by Portfolio A: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>44 Skills (25% increase) by Portfolio A </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>12 Skills (7% increase) by Portfolio B </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Average Skills per teacher post-cluster: 5.06 out of a possible 11 </li></ul><ul><li>Largest increase: Integration of international education into curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Second largest increase: Telecommunication linkages </li></ul>
    26. 26. Unintended finding: Joy & Happiness <ul><li>Teachers found this experience to be fun. Words used: exciting, exhilarating, enlightening, fun, rewarding, energizing, eager, enthusiastic, eye-opening, interesting, rewarding </li></ul><ul><li>Three reasons cited: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher reaction to experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher reaction to something the students did </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers reporting directly on students’ reactions </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. Flow, Happiness and Joy <ul><li>Csikszentmihalyi (2004) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Flow is the “state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Happiness does not simply happen to us. It’s something that we make happen and it results from doing our best </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Wolk (2008) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers should own their teaching so that they can experience joy in school. </li></ul></ul>
    28. 28. Implications <ul><li>Encourage travel for pre-service educators as this seems to encourage an interest in global education. </li></ul><ul><li>Primacy of culture was clear. Possibly emphasize teaching other knowledge components of global education at all levels. </li></ul><ul><li>When offering global education professional development, analyze knowledge and skills of participants and define specific objectives. </li></ul>
    29. 29. Limitations <ul><li>Small study size </li></ul><ul><li>Clusters are unique to Delaware </li></ul><ul><li>Study conducted over 2 years </li></ul><ul><li>May not be generalizable outside of Delaware </li></ul>
    30. 30. Clusters Now <ul><li>Initial cluster was offered for 5 years; reached approximately 120 teachers </li></ul><ul><li>It was updated for renewal; modifications were made: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Added additional face-to-face meetings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased mentor support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Additional instructional time on data analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Clusters put on moratorium in 2008 due to State budgetary limitations </li></ul>
    31. 31. <ul><li>The question of global education should not be one of choice, but of requirement to ensure that students in the United States can understand and appreciate the peoples, cultures, and histories of other countries and are prepared for their future. </li></ul>
    32. 32. Thank You <ul><li>Information about the International Education Technology Cluster is available at www.dcet.k12.de.us/instructional </li></ul><ul><li>If you are interested in my study, please email me. Ask for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Modzelewski Matrix of Knowledge and Skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research results </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resources and literature list </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wendy Modzelewski </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul>

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