Key Drivers of Educational Performance in Finland International Perspectives on U.S. Education Policy and Practice: What C...
Is Finland a high-performing nation? <ul><li>According to international indicators  ‘yes’  because: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul>...
Has there been improvement over time? <ul><li>The evidence suggests  ‘yes’  because in the past Finland had: </li></ul><ul...
Most important changes and policies <ul><li>Peruskoulu  (nine-year basic school) in early 1970s </li></ul><ul><li>Law on T...
The most important factors in the successful implementation of these policies <ul><li>The Finnish Dream:  Good school for ...
1. The Finnish dream: Good school for all <ul><li>1866: Folk School (same education for all) </li></ul><ul><li>1919/21: Th...
2. Less is more: Teach less, learn more Source: OECD How much do teachers spend time in classrooms?
2. Less is more: Teach less, learn more Source: OECD How much do students spend time in classrooms?
2. Less is more: Test less, learn more OECD average National achievement averages of 15-year-old students in mathematics (...
3. The Finnish Privilege: Teachers Accepted
4. The Finnish Way Global Educational Reform Movement (germ) FOCUS ON CORE SUBJECTS COMPETITION STANDARDIZATION TEST-BASED...
4. The Finnish Way “ MARKETIZATION” “ PROFESSIONALISM” Global Educational Reform Movement (germ) The Finnish Way FOCUS ON ...
Top goals for education system in Finland  <ul><li>Better individual learning paths </li></ul><ul><li>More creativity in  ...
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Pasi Sahlberg, Finland

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Powerpoint presentation from Asia Society/CCSSO symposium: International Perspectives on U.S. Education Policy and Practice: What Can We Learn from High Performing Nations?

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Pasi Sahlberg, Finland

  1. 1. Key Drivers of Educational Performance in Finland International Perspectives on U.S. Education Policy and Practice: What Can We Learn from High Performing Nations? Washington, DC April 27 – 28, 2010 Pasi Sahlberg Director General
  2. 2. Is Finland a high-performing nation? <ul><li>According to international indicators ‘yes’ because: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>high graduation and low drop-out rates </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>equitable outcomes and equal opportunities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>high student achievement </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>moderate overall spending </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>high rankings in other performances as well </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Has there been improvement over time? <ul><li>The evidence suggests ‘yes’ because in the past Finland had: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>low level of educational attainment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>deep inequality and elitist structure </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>modest student achievement </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>teachers without proper education </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>big gap to other OECD countries </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Most important changes and policies <ul><li>Peruskoulu (nine-year basic school) in early 1970s </li></ul><ul><li>Law on Teacher Education in 1979 </li></ul><ul><li>Reformed upper secondary education in1980s/90s </li></ul><ul><li>Promotion of trust since early 1990s </li></ul>
  5. 5. The most important factors in the successful implementation of these policies <ul><li>The Finnish Dream: Good school for all </li></ul><ul><li>The Finnish Principle: Less is more </li></ul><ul><li>The Finnish Privilege: Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>The Finnish Way: Only dead fish follow the stream </li></ul>
  6. 6. 1. The Finnish dream: Good school for all <ul><li>1866: Folk School (same education for all) </li></ul><ul><li>1919/21: The Constitution and the Law on Education: Education is a civil right for all </li></ul><ul><li>1966: Peruskoulu (comprehensive basic school) </li></ul><ul><li>1980s: Tracking/streaming abolished </li></ul><ul><li>1990s: Upper secondary education for all </li></ul>
  7. 7. 2. Less is more: Teach less, learn more Source: OECD How much do teachers spend time in classrooms?
  8. 8. 2. Less is more: Teach less, learn more Source: OECD How much do students spend time in classrooms?
  9. 9. 2. Less is more: Test less, learn more OECD average National achievement averages of 15-year-old students in mathematics (PISA 2006) Source: OECD
  10. 10. 3. The Finnish Privilege: Teachers Accepted
  11. 11. 4. The Finnish Way Global Educational Reform Movement (germ) FOCUS ON CORE SUBJECTS COMPETITION STANDARDIZATION TEST-BASED ACCOUNTABILITY CONTROL
  12. 12. 4. The Finnish Way “ MARKETIZATION” “ PROFESSIONALISM” Global Educational Reform Movement (germ) The Finnish Way FOCUS ON CORE SUBJECTS BREADTH AND CREATIVITY COMPETITION COLLABORATION STANDARDIZATION INDIVIDUALIZATION TEST-BASED ACCOUNTABILITY TRUST-BASED RESPONSIBILITY CONTROL AUTONOMY
  13. 13. Top goals for education system in Finland <ul><li>Better individual learning paths </li></ul><ul><li>More creativity in peruskoulu </li></ul><ul><li>Stay in the Finnish Way! </li></ul>
  14. 14. Thank you!

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