Introduction To Ethical Literacy

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Introduction To Ethical Literacy

  1. 1. Introduction to Ethical Literacy® July 9, 2009 Don Proffit Ethical Literacy® Coach Copyright © 2009 by the Institute for Global Ethics. Certain materials and methodologies described in these pages are the proprietary intellectual property of the Institute for Global Ethics.  They are provided expressly for use within this workshop offered by the Institute on the indicated date, and may not be further copied, excerpted, used, or distributed outside the participant group at the workshop without the express written permission of the Institute for Global Ethics.
  2. 2. The Institute for Global Ethics est.1990 <ul><li>A non partisan, non sectarian, non profit promoting ethical behavior in individuals, institutions and nations through public discourse, practical action and research. </li></ul><ul><li>Serving for profits, non profits and schools </li></ul><ul><li>Offices in Maine, New York and London </li></ul>Copyright © Institute for Global Ethics, 2009.  Please do not copy or redistribute www.globalethics.org
  3. 3. Ethics concepts for today’s world <ul><li>Technology leverages the need for ethics: the scale and sophistication of modern systems </li></ul><ul><li>Obedience to the Unenforceable: Lord Moulton, 1920’s. Deterioration of self regulation in today’s society </li></ul>Copyright © Institute for Global Ethics, 2009.  Please do not copy or redistribute www.globalethics.org
  4. 4. Our approach <ul><li>Based on concepts, not personalities or content </li></ul><ul><li>Socratic: “how to think, not what to think” </li></ul><ul><li>No formulas, lots of tools </li></ul><ul><li>Grappling with gray areas instead of reducing the world to black and white </li></ul>Copyright © Institute for Global Ethics, 2009.  Please do not copy or redistribute www.globalethics.org
  5. 5. Copyright © Institute for Global Ethics, 2009.  Please do not copy or redistribute www.globalethics.org Honesty Truth Trustworthy Integrity* Compassion Love Kindness Responsibility Integrity* Respect Inclusiveness Fairness Justice Equality Wisdom Loyalty Shared Values Worldwide Humility Unity Freedom
  6. 6. Schools of Integrity Findings <ul><li>1. Cross-cutting dimension: Attention to values and ethics permeate these learning environments at both the adult and the student level. If we want students to be truly good people, the climate of their learning environment — the “ how we do things around here ” of their school ’ s organizational culture — must clearly stem from and telegraph a platform of shared ethical values. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Schools of Integrity Findings <ul><li>2. Driver and connector: Across participating schools, higher-order thinking skills are emphasized and deliberately linked to the moral realm. Values and ethics undergird critical thought by connecting “ the personal ” to the more academic topics and concepts. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Fueling relationships: The perceptions and opinions students volunteer will only be authentic in an environment where they feel trusted and can really speak their minds. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Schools of Integrity Findings <ul><li>4. Culture of open feedback: For adults to build these strong, successful relationships with students, the same high levels of trust must permeate faculty relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>5. Trustees as keepers of the moral compass: If there is a source from which trust most effectively evolves in a school, it may be from the body bearing the name. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Schools of Integrity Findings <ul><li>6. Tone at the top: The most important conduit for trust is the head of school. Students, faculty, trustees, and parents frequently refer to this important leadership feature. Throughout these cultures the ethical actions, decisions, and communication of the school head are noticed and appreciated. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Schools of Integrity Findings <ul><li>7. Tolerance for ambiguity: Heads and other adults model and live “ trust: ” they trust their collaboration and processes, they trust that they ’ ll sometimes get stuck and that they ’ ll constantly have doubts, and they trust their ability to think things and see things through. </li></ul><ul><li>8. Professional development from the ranks: Teachers trust their professional judgment and share it, just as they expect students to contribute their very best perceptions, opinions, and understanding. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Schools of Integrity Findings <ul><li>9. Authentic student input: Teachers welcome serious student input in a variety of aspects of these school communities. They trust their students ’ ability to make good decisions. </li></ul><ul><li>10. Growth, not punishment: Disciplinary approaches are the most consistent area of student input across these schools. Students are trusted to provide effective feedback and consequences that educate, rather than punish, fellow students who have broken the rules. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Schools of Integrity Findings Individual Thinking: Rate your school context for each of the ten findings Copyright © Institute for Global Ethics, 2009.  Please do not copy or redistribute www.globalethics.org
  13. 13. The Ethical Literacy Community <ul><li>An expanding network of schools dedicated to building school cultures of integrity. Each school works on building its culture. All schools are connected to each other through shared resources and new ideas, and our annual conference. </li></ul>Copyright © Institute for Global Ethics, 2009.  Please do not copy or redistribute www.globalethics.org
  14. 14. Ethical Literacy 3-Phase Process: <ul><li>Readiness </li></ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching </li></ul>Copyright © Institute for Global Ethics, 2009.  Please do not copy or redistribute www.globalethics.org
  15. 15. A quick story … Copyright © Institute for Global Ethics, 2009.  Please do not copy or redistribute www.globalethics.org
  16. 16. Right-versus-Right Paradigms <ul><li>truth vs. loyalty </li></ul><ul><li>individual vs. community </li></ul><ul><li>short-term vs. long-term </li></ul><ul><li>justice vs. mercy </li></ul>Copyright © Institute for Global Ethics, 2009.  Please do not copy or redistribute www.globalethics.org
  17. 17. Q/A : The Ethical Literacy® Initiative Copyright © Institute for Global Ethics, 2009.  Please do not copy or redistribute www.globalethics.org
  18. 18. Thank you! [email_address]

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