Integrating International Perspectives into US History

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Global Learning for Educators webinars are offered free twice monthly, September 2012 - May 2013. Please visit asiasociety.org/webinars for details and registration.

National History Day and The National Council for History Education present their approaches to internationalizing U.S. History. Both organizations are creating resources to be used by teachers to contextualize U.S. History – from the Revolutionary War to the Cold War. We will discuss the approaches, the resources, and the implications for today’s teachers.

Presenters: Noralee Frankel, consultant with National History Day
Craig Perrier, High School Social Studies Specialist, Fairfax County Public Schools
Respondent: Dale Steiner, professor of History, California State University, Chico

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Integrating International Perspectives into US History

  1. 1. ModeratorsJennifer Manise Heather SingmasterLongview Foundation Asia SocietyIntegrating International Perspectives intoU.S. History – Resources for theChallenges Facing Today’s Teacher
  2. 2. Integrating International Perspectives into U.S. History –Resources for the Challenges Facing Today’s Teacher#globalushistory@longviewglobal@nationalhistory
  3. 3. Integrating International Perspectives into U.S. History –Resources for the Challenges Facing Today’s TeacherCraig PerrierHigh School Social StudiesSpecialistFairfax County PublicSchoolsFairfax, VANoralee FrankelConsultantNational History DayDale SteinerProfessor, HistoryCalifornia State UniversityChico
  4. 4. Integrating International Perspectives into U.S. History –Resources for the Challenges Facing Today’s TeacherNoralee FrankelConsultantNational History Day
  5. 5. • National History Day is a highly regardedacademic program for middle school andsecondary school students• Each year students, encouraged bythousands of teachers nationwideparticipate in the National History Daycontest.What is National History Day?
  6. 6. • In addition to discovering the exciting world of thepast, National History Day also helps studentsdevelop the following attributes that are critical forfuture success:• Critical thinking and problem-solving skills• Oral and written communication and presentation skills• Self-esteem and confidence• A sense of responsibility for and involvement in thedemocratic process
  7. 7. U.S. History in Global PerspectiveCo-edited by Mark Johnson,history teacher at ConcordiaInternational School inShanghai and NHD affiliatecoordinator for Asia andNoralee Frankel,Independent Historian
  8. 8. • Teaching and Learning for the Real WorldNHD Embodies and Fosters 21st Century Skills andCommon Core State StandardsJoan Ruddiman, Thomas R. Grover Middle School• Globalizing National History Day’s AnnualThemesNoralee Frankel• The Global American RevolutionEliga Gould, University of New Hampshire
  9. 9. • Land Labor and LossThe role of indigenous land rights in Nineteenthcentury Nation-State formation in the UnitedStates of America, Australia and IndiaWhitney Howarth, Plymouth State University• All the PeopleEpidemic Diseases in the U.S. and the WorldGeorge Dehner, Wichita State University• The American Civil WarRyan CampbellBritish International School, Jakarta
  10. 10. • Becoming Chinese in AmericaGiving Voice to the Chinese in the American WestMark Johnson, Concordia International School Shanghai• Salem as a Global VillageIndustrialization, Deindustrialization, andImmigration in a New England CityAviva Chomsky, Salem State University• The Civil Rights Movement inGlobal PerspectiveKevin Gaines, University of Michigan
  11. 11. Integrating International Perspectives into U.S. History –Resources for the Challenges Facing Today’s TeacherCraig PerrierSocial Studies SpecialistFairfax County Public SchoolsConsultantNational Council for History Educationhttp://cperrier.edublogs.org
  12. 12. Globalizing the US History Survey“History education “at its best is critical, exciting, thought-provoking, frustratingly ambiguousand uncertain. It is the reflective element of the collective mind.” Richard OveryTheory andBackgroundParadigmShiftNCHEProject
  13. 13. Theory and Background• 1916 “Transnational History” - Randolph Bourne• 2000 La Pietra Report - OAH• 2006 The New Global History - Bruce Mazlish• 2006 A Nation Among Nations - Thomas Bender• 2007 Transnational Nation - Ian Tyrrell“The nation-state has not been able to exhaust the identifications of theindividual…Modern nation-states have to confront or engage with otherhistorical representations of community.”Prasenjit Duara in Rescuing History from the Nation
  14. 14. Theory and BackgroundGlobal• History without acenter• A web of networks andsystems• Example – Cold WarNarrativeTransnational• Nodes of actors locatedacross regions• National histories don’tend at the border• Example –MultinationalOrganization
  15. 15. Paradigm Shift• Demands of Contemporary Education• Instructional Change• Not an “add on” in Teaching• Way of Knowing: Context and Contingency• Addresses Binary Thought, the Marginalized,Agency, and Othering“We should hold under suspicion any word that describes a chunk of the storywhile claiming universal relevance. Words such as progress, development,modernity, nation-state, and globalization.”Michel-Rolph Trouillot in Global Transformations
  16. 16. Paradigm Shift
  17. 17. NCHE Project:Globalizing the US HistorySurvey• Overview of Project– Global… (ization, Awareness, Competencies, Intelligence– Target Audience– Professional Development– Open Source– Theory and Utility– Longevity“Recent discussions of globalization . . . invite more complexunderstandings of the American nations relation to a world that is atonce self-consciously global and highly pluralized.”La Pietra Report
  18. 18. NCHE Project:Globalizing the US History Survey• Five module topics1. Interwar U.S. Foreign Policy: The Myth of U.S. Isolationism 1920-19402. Beyond a Bipolar Cold War: Teaching Global Geo-Politics 1945-19733. Civil Rights are Human Rights: Global Contexts of Equality in the20th Century4. Multi-National Companies and International Organizations in USHistory5. Situating the U.S. in Globalization Paradigms 1980-2012• Features- Badges - Netvibes Page- Social Media - Collaborative Timeline- History Thinking Skills - Historian Presentations
  19. 19. Conclusion “Over time and cultures, the most robust and most effectiveform of communication is the creation of a powerfulnarrative.”Howard Gardner
  20. 20. Integrating International Perspectives into U.S. History –Resources for the Challenges Facing Today’s TeacherDale SteinerProfessor, HistoryCalifornia State University ChicoChair, Board of TrusteesNational Council for History Education
  21. 21. Integrating International Perspectives into U.S. History –Resources for the Challenges Facing Today’s TeacherResourceshttp://asiasociety.org/education/resources-schools/termhttp://www.nche.net/homehttp://www.nhd.org/http://www.longviewfdn.org/66/resources.htmlhttp://cperrier.edublogs.org
  22. 22. Integrating International Perspectives into U.S. History –Resources for the Challenges Facing Today’s TeacherQuestionsfrom theAudience
  23. 23. Integrating International Perspectives into U.S. History –Resources for the Challenges Facing Today’s TeacherNext Webinar from the StatesNetwork on InternationalEducation in the SchoolsSeptember/October 2013
  24. 24. Connecting Global Competence to Teacher Preparation

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