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Gps mod 8 v2.11

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Gps mod 8 v2.11

  1. 1. 1
  2. 2. Graduation Portfolio Modules 2 Modules Module 1 What is GPS? Module 2 What are Performance Outcomes? Module 3 How are Performance Outcomes Connected to Our Standards? Module 4 What kind of Instruction Supports our Work? Module 5 How do I Design Performance Tasks? Module 6 How do we Design Units that Support this Work? Module 7 What makes a High Quality Unit? Module 8 How do we give Meaningful Feedback to Students? Module 9 How do we connect this GPS work to our work across the network? Module 10 How do Students Manage the Process?
  3. 3. Feedback Module 8 3
  4. 4. Objectives Participants will be able to answer: • How do we give meaningful feedback for students? • What are the uses of rubrics? • What are the components of a good rubric? 4
  5. 5. Review Types of Student Feedback 1. Task Design Checklist 2. Annotated Task 3. Tuning Protocol 4. Checklists? 5. Rubrics? 5
  6. 6. Protocols for Feedback 6
  7. 7. Feedback: Key Research Findings 7 When feedback is corrective in nature—that is, it explains where and why students have made errors--significant increases in student learning occur (Lysakowski & Walberg, 1981, 1982; Walberg, 1999; Tennenbaum & Goldring, 1989). Feedback has been shown to be one of the most significant activities a teacher can engage in to improve student achievement (Hattie, 1992). Asking students to continue working on a task until it is completed and accurate (until the standard is met) enhances student achievement (Marzano, Pickering, & Pollock, 2001).
  8. 8. Feedback: Key Research Findings Effective feedback is timely. Delay in providing students feedback diminishes its value for learning (Banger-Drowns, Kulik, Kulik, & Morgan, 1991). Effective learning results from students providing their own feedback, monitoring their work against established criteria (Trammel, Schloss, & Alper, 1994; Wiggins, 1993). Rubrics provide students with helpful criteria for success, making desired learning outcomes clearer to them. Criterion-referenced feedback provides the right kind of guidance for improving student understanding (Crooks, 1988; Wilburn & Felps, 1983). 8
  9. 9. What Is a Rubric? A scoring tool that specifies the level of expected outcomes for a specific content or performance area. The eight GPS rubrics indicate the specific expectations required to meet emerging, developing, proficient, and advanced competencies on specific skills. Students must score proficient or advanced to be certified.
  10. 10. Studying the GPS Rubrics to provide meaningful feedback Copyright Asia Society 2010; modified from Stanford SRN, 2009
  11. 11. :Goals Support Credibility & Defensibility Of GPS Participants will: • understand the importance of scoring fairly and reliably • become familiar more familiar with the POs • become familiar with the scoring rubrics and study charts • identify potential sources of bias in scoring • understand key features of the rubric, how to gather evidence, and how to match evidence to rubric levels. • understand the distinctions between levels of the rubrics • be trained to reliably score student work and teach students how to score their own work Copyright Asia Society 2010; modified from Stanford SRN, 2009
  12. 12. Handouts Copyright Asia Society 2010; modified from Stanford SRN, 2009 Content Areas 1.Performance Outcomes 2.Performance Outcome Rubrics 3.Rubric Scoring Forms 4.Student Work Samples:
  13. 13. Arts Performance Outcomes Investigate The World Through Artistic Expression:  Utilize artistic expression to generate and explain the personal significance of locally, regionally, or globally focused issues or driving questions  Identify, collect, and analyze evidence required to respond to significant questions using varied art forms, artifacts, media, and modes of expression.  Weigh, integrate, and synthesize evidence collected to create artistic expressions and discern effectiveness through critical response to the expressions.  Engage in critical artistic discourse based on compelling evidence that considers multiple perspectives and draws defensible conclusions. Copyright Asia Society 2010; modified from Stanford SRN, 2009
  14. 14. Arts Scoring Form of Rubric Copyright Asia Society 2010; modified from Stanford SRN, 2009 Scoring Dimension “Emerging” “Developing” “Proficient/College Ready” “Advanced” Investigate The World Through Artistic Expression: Students investigate the world beyond their immediate environment through the creation of personal and collaborative artistic expressions (e.g. dance, music, theater, visual arts). How effectively does a student work in and through the arts to investigate the world? • The student generates an artistic expression but does not connect to personal significance. • The student identifies only one work of visual or performing arts to determine its relevance to globally significant themes. • The student gathers evidence to create artistic expressions. • Evidence considers only one perspective. • The student utilizes artistic expression in limited ways to generate the personal significance of locally, regionally, or globally focused issues or driving questions. • The student identifies a variety of works of visual or performing arts to determine their relevance to globally significant themes. • The student analyzes and weighs evidence to create artistic expressions. • The student engages in limited critical artistic discourse based on limited evidence that considers multiple perspectives. • The student utilizes artistic expression to generate and explain the personal significance of locally, regionally, or globally focused issues or driving questions. • The student identifies, observes, and interprets a variety of works of visual or performing arts to determine their relevance to globally significant themes. • The student analyzes, weighs, integrates, and synthesizes evidence to create artistic expressions and discern effectiveness and critically responds to the expressions. • The student engages in critical artistic discourse based on evidence that considers multiple perspectives and draws defensible conclusions. • The student utilizes artistic expression to generate and explain the personal significance of locally, regionally, or globally focused issues or driving questions and makes a compelling argument for his/her position. • The student identifies, observes, and interprets a variety of works of visual or performing arts to determine their relevance to globally significant themes and creates a personal artistic response. • The student curates an exhibit of visual or performing arts works, with narration that responds critically to the evidence synthesized. • The student supports his/her discourse with well-selected pieces of visual or performing arts, created personally or by others.
  15. 15. Scoring Process • While reading, take notes on evidence related to the big ideas from the rubrics for that task • After reading the work sample, review your notes. On each rubric page, summarize key features of evidence and patterns from the notes • Assign the relevant score for the rubric Copyright Asia Society 2010; modified from Stanford SRN, 2009
  16. 16. Note-taking • Notes reflect big ideas in the scoring rubric. • Notes reflect objective evidence, and not a judgment. • Notes capture the complexity and quality of the performance documented in the materials submitted. Copyright Asia Society 2010; modified from Stanford SRN, 2009
  17. 17. Specificity of Notes • Too General: “Very reflective” • Too Specific: “In the conclusion paragraph of the essay, the student explains what her initial ideas were about the issue and how her ideas have evolved in light of other evidence on the issue.” • About right: “Conclusion p.11 – reflects on changes in personal views” Copyright Asia Society 2010; modified from Stanford SRN, 2009
  18. 18. Discussing the Work • These are secondary students, not college students; look for what they can do, not what they cannot yet do • Respectful discussion of the students and our teacher colleagues, as we peer in at these performances • That said, we can learn from scoring student work, so let’s be (respectfully) sharp and critical so we all can make the system excel in what it captures, differentiates Copyright Asia Society 2010; modified from Stanford SRN, 2009
  19. 19. Bias • Biases affect our ability to score fairly and objectively - affects score reliability • Appropriate biases – Consistent with scoring criteria • Inappropriate biases – Qualities of writing unrelated to scoring criteria – Halo effect – “Packaging” of work that obscures quality of content – Emotional reactions – Differences in viewpoint or positions – Knowledge of student / teacher Copyright Asia Society 2010; modified from Stanford SRN, 2009
  20. 20. Surfacing our biases • Being aware of biases helps us to minimize their undue influence • Spend time listing the personal biases that you think may affect your ability to score objectively Copyright Asia Society 2010; modified from Stanford SRN, 2009
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  22. 22. Reflection 22
  23. 23. Classroom Follow-up • How will we communicate these ideas to the student? – Advisory? – Content area courses? – Schoolwide? 23

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